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Posts Tagged ‘Black and White Photography’

Notable: VASA Connections Project – Online Portfolio Review

In Black and White Photography, Photographer on September 22, 2014 at 1:21 pm
A sample of VASA's international field of judges

A sample of VASA’s international field of judges

As a creator of just about anything, presenting it to a respected contemporary in one form or another is inevitably a crucial step in validation and growth. Social media have provided unprecedented outlets of greater convenience; in the VASA Connection’s project, photographers have their own tool for growth.

Vasa Project

The VASA Project in an online media studies workshop connecting individuals and communities on a global scale who have interest in media studies, photography, digital media arts, and sound.

To meet its vision, the VASA Project supports online media-related workshops; gallery talks by artist, critics, historians, and theoreticians; curated exhibitions; an e-bookstore; “Transmedia” the VASA Project blog, and other media-related blog projects and discussion groups.

The VASA Project is based upon the union of two familiar environments: the traditional workshop model and networked digital media technology.

Utilizing Connections, aspiring artists have the opportunity to be given an online portfolio by respected members of the photography community. The beauty, of course, is that there is no limitation on whom will give the review since VASA is a global network. The service isn’t free, but it is still cheaper than it would be to meet most of these fair people in person.

For more information on VASA and the Connection’s project: VASA 

Notable: Deadline Approaches for Fellowship 15 International Photography Competition, Silver Eye Center of Photography

In Article, Black and White Photography, Contest on September 19, 2014 at 3:15 pm

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Special note: We are please to post item 400 for your viewing pleasure. Check out the archives today at BWGallerist!!

Cameramen and women eager to get their competitive juices flowing have one month left to enter Fellowship 15, Silver Eye Center’s competition to recognize promising photographers from Pennsylvania to the far corners of the Earth. While the fee for non-members of the center is $65 dollars, the potential rewards should be worth it for those who believe they have the goods.

Awards

  • One (1) International Award Winner receives a solo exhibition at Silver Eye opening late-January 2015; $3,000 cash prize; an online gallery on Silver Eye’s website (with link to artist website); and media outreach and promotion.
  • One (1) Keystone Award Winner, reserved for a Pennsylvania artist, receives a spotlight exhibition in late-January 2015; $1,000 cash prize; an online gallery on Silver Eye’s website (with link to artist website); and media outreach and promotion.
  • Five (5) Juror’s Commendation Winners will be named on Silver Eye’s website and press releases.

 

Juror

 

Allison Grant is a curator, artist, writer, and teacher based in Chicago, IL. Since 2008, she has worked at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, where she is an assistant curator. Grant holds an MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago and a BFA from the Columbus College of Art and Design in Media Studies. She currently teaches as an Adjunct Faculty member in the Photography and Art & Design departments at Columbia College Chicago.

 

 

Again, the deadline to enter is October 13th, plenty of time to get everything ready – except maybe for you procrastinators out there.

To enter, check out the following link: Silver Eye Fellowship 15

Preview: Sonic, Hedi Slimane, Fondation Pierre Bergé, Yves Saint Laurent, Paris, France

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery on September 18, 2014 at 3:11 pm
Frances Bean Cobain (Daughter of Kurt Cobain), Hedi Slimane

Frances Bean Cobain (Daughter of Kurt Cobain), Hedi Slimane

Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards has gained a lot of lines on his face over the course of his career, lines that tell stories much like the way Richard’s guitar recalls with every note that is strummed. Of course, Richards is just one of many music stalwarts who have left an imprint over the course of the past sixty years. As a music fan, designer for Saint Laurent and photographer, Hedi Slimane is in a unique position to convey Rock n Roll’s history through the camera lens. Often capricious and unpredictable, Slimane’s prickly-ness only adds to his photography’s dynamic, appropriately running parallel to his preferred music’s own nature.

The Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent will present an exhibition of photographs by Hedi Slimane entitled “Sonic” from September 2014.

Studio portraits will be taken from 15 years of musical archives, amongst which are black and white prints exhibited for the first time, including portrayals of heroic rock figures, from Lou Reed to Brian Wilson, from Amy Winehouse to Keith Richards.

The project will be completed with a video installation, juxtaposing the musical cycles of London (2003-2007) and California (2007-2014) in a documentary style, painting an alternative portrait of two generations of performers and their fans.

Sonic will open later this September on the 18th. Fortunately for those who may not be in Paris anytime soon, the exhibit will be on view until January ’15.

For More Information: Fondation Pierre Bergé

Preview: Women – Seeing and Being Seen, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 16, 2014 at 11:13 am
Untitled: 26061208 ,Niniane Kelly, 2012

Untitled: 26061208, Niniane Kelly, 2012

The female form has been perhaps the most ubiquitously discussed concept of human anatomy. At the very least, it has provided the muse for many an artist and photographer, not to mention Scott Nichols Gallery’s latest exhibition.

The exhibition’s nearly 60 photographs of women ranging from circa 1870s to the present explore the myriad ways in which female, and male, photographers view women and how women choose to be seen. It includes the work of Ansel Adams, Kiichi Asano, Ruth Bernhard, Anne Brigman, Wynn Bullock, Imogen Cunningham, Judy Dater, Margo Davis, Monica Denevan, Mona Kuhn, Dorothea Lange, An-My Lê, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Linda McCartney, Annette Lemieux, Barbara Morgan, Hiroshi Osaka, Paul Strand, Brett Weston and Edward Weston, among others.

A complementary show in the smaller gallery features Dorothea Lange and the work of several of her contemporaries including Ansel Adams, represented by his documentation of women belonging to the group of 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry interned in camps during World War II.

The subject of women for a photo exhibition can be rife with stereotypes and predictable patterns. Here the tropes of women in the nude and in nature, as well as fashion photography are juxtaposed with humorous images such as Roger Minnick’s tourist at Inspiration Point, Yosemite, and Annette Lemieux’s spooky, sobering Apparition. Edward Weston’s Erica, Point Lobos is a less familiar representation of his work: his granddaughter on a beach the year before he stopped photographing. The women photographers of Group f/64 represented may be seen to replace the appropriation of certain of these tropes with ownership of an alternative way of “seeing and being seen.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: “And Here We Are …”, Red Filter Gallery, Lambertville, N. J.

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 9, 2014 at 1:50 pm

Postcard_AbdoneyAlbert

With two very different approaches to monochromatic photography, the photographs of Kelli Abdoney and Sandy Alpert are on display at Red Filter Gallery in Lambertville NJ.

Caithness and Sutherland Landscapes

“I find the landscapes of Caithness and Sutherland quite extraordinary. There is an overwhelming energy in the rugged battered coastlines and a powerful sense of history and prehistory that saturates the land. The 180-degree horizon, which cradles an abundance of weather from dawn to dusk, the sprawling landscapes that have sustained man and the clarity of it’s light are only but a few of Caithness and Sutherland’s physical qualities.”  -  Kelli Abdoney

The Vertical Expression of Horizontal Desire

“For three minutes, the dancers of the tango allow the music to transport them into another world; one of their own creation.  Imagined moments … the stud, the seductress, the prostitute, the cuckold seeking retribution with the much-younger woman who delights in his touch.  I watch these fictionalized characters come to life in their faces, in their bodies as they succumb to the seductive rapture of the syncopated rhythms.”  -  Sandy Alpert

Both artists have exhibited in multiple venues both domestically and internationally and have placed their works in collections spanning a broad area of interest.

Now through November 2

For more information: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Atlanta Celebrates Photography, Digital Guide for the Fall

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 8, 2014 at 1:57 pm

Earlier this summer, we informed our readers about Atlanta Celebrates Photography’s (ACP) portfolio review and annual review. Now we are bringing the news of ACP’s digital guide being launched by the foundation. While the Decatur Book Festival has now passed (August 30th and 31st), ACP has a ton still in store for the rest of the year. Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: One and Only, Ray K. Metzker, Laurence Miller Gallery, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photographer on September 4, 2014 at 11:43 am

 

Philadelphia Penn Center, 1965, Ray K Metzker

Philadelphia Penn Center, 1965, Ray K Metzker

Photography is often mitigated to a documentary vehicle in the minds of the average person. Fortunately in the world of art and photofiles, people such as Ray K. Metzker are around to continually push the boundaries of what people can expect from the camera.

Esteemed as a photographer, Ray Metzker’s creative practice was nevertheless unbounded by the conventional borders of the medium. Metzker sought out methods that allowed him access to the full potential of photography as an art form. He continually explored the medium’s untapped possibilities; at various times embracing the roll of film as a single picture, using the prints as building blocks for composite works, and even setting aside the camera to explore the expressive potential of the developing process itself.

Nowhere is his spirit of creative curiosity more evident than in the unique, non-editioned works that he crafted at every stage in his career. These one of a kind pieces are the focus of our new exhibition, many of them shown here for the first time.

A broad range of techniques and sensibilities are on display in this group of pictures. Even in some of the earliest pictures, dating from 1957, objects have been dissolved past the point of recognition leaving form and light as the subject. The world that comes back into focus later in the exhibition is often the natural one, as in his photograms from the 1990s where ghosts of leaves are traced onto the paper itself. Towards the end of the show’s chronology there are light-drawn “landscapes” where wind whipped clouds and darkened horizons rise up not out of a camera’s aperture but from light and the darkroom’s chemicals alone. There is an elemental quality to these later works: they seem to be striving to depict an essence more than an image.

Some of the most revealing works included are the pieces that employ only cut and folded paper. Metzker was always a very material photographer, as his darkroom manipulations attest, and in these works it is as if concerns of photographic exposure have fallen away and he is directly arranging light and shade in this most tactile of ways.

Opening this week on September 4th, people will have until October 25th to catch this unique exhibit.

For More Information: Ray K. Metzker

Preview: The Altered Landscape: New Humanoid Constructions, Ruth Formanek, SoHo Photo, Soho, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 2, 2014 at 2:47 pm
Image courtesy of Ruth Formanek

Image courtesy of Ruth Formanek

Adding to their already busy schedule this fall, SoHo Photo Gallery is displaying 12 new works from Ruth Formanek. Utilizing landscape photographs as the base, Formanek has twisted them in a near Rorschach-ian manner, resulting in surreal and  striking final products. 

“A photo of a landscape may or may not look like its original. The landscape can’t be changed but its image can be converted to whatever you choose. The landscapes in this show of 12 digital color photographs-mostly of Utah’s rocky mountains and Florida’s lakes-playfully and sometimes whimsically express something suggested by their original shape or color. The original image becomes a means to an unknown end, sometimes with unconscious themes.”

Ruth Formanek has been a keen observer of nature and human behavior since childhood. She is Professor emerita at Hofstra University, where she taught developmental psychology for over 30 years, wrote/edited professional books and two books of her photographs. She has had solo shows at Soho Photo Gallery, participated in group shows at libraries, the Manhattan Borough President’s Office, and many other other locations. Ruth has received awards from Johns Hopkins (first place in Documentary competition), U. S. Park Service, Jamaica Bay Nature Center (second place), and others.

With an opening reception on September 4th, 6-8pm, Formanek’s works will be part of seven solo shows as part of Soho Photo’s fall opener. New Yorkers and visitors will have until October 3rd to check out the exhibit.

For More Information: Soho Photo

Preview: “Nuit Blanche”, Wendy Paton at Michener Art Museum

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Books, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 31, 2014 at 12:22 pm

Wendy Michner

 

Our friend Wendy Paton has a MAJOR exhibition at the Michener Museum in Doylestown, Pa. With over 60 works on display this is an opportunity to view the work of a major contemporary artist.

An award winning fine art photographer, Wendy Paton was in the throes of a successful, ground breaking career training and driving Standardbred race horses in New York, when in 1981, her interest in photography emerged.She studied at the International Center of Photography in New York, learned the intricacies of night photography from Michael Kenna, and darkroom printing techniques from her mentor and collaborator, master printer Chuck Kelton.

Consisting of two bodies of work,NUIT BLANCHE comprises a premiere selection of Paton’s Visages de Nuit, complemented by a collection of her latest series,Reclaiming Dignity, in an installation of seventy of the artist’s gelatin silver prints.

VISAGES DE NUIT is a collection of 51 black and white candid night portraits, shot over a six-year period from 2006-2012 in various international cities. Paton created this series of nocturnal images, exploring the mystery of the night and bringing the viewer into her subject’s nighttime world. Their dark, gritty characteristics purposely convey Paton’s interpretation of the surreal quality of life at night, and what is hiding behind what we normally view as reality.

RECLAIMING DIGNITY is a portfolio of Paton’s vision of “abstract portraits,” faces and bodies of neglected cars, once coveted for their style, beauty, speed and grace. Left unattended and ignored for years, then a chance to once again be admired and coveted; an opportunity to “reclaim their dignity.”

Now through December 7.

For more information: Wendy Paton

Preview: Lois Conner, Gitterman Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 24, 2014 at 11:57 am
CH99118 Pudong, Shanghai (1999)

Image Courtesy of Lois Conner

For any aspiring politician, working at the United Nations at the age of 20 would likely be a dream scenario. Turns out it’s a pretty good start for photographers as well. Conner, who spent 13 years under the UN’s umbrella, absorbed a multitude of cultures during her stay, particularly China, which she has now visited annually for 30 years. The culmination of these efforts is her latest book, Beijing: Contemporary and Imperial, shot in sprawling 7×17 panorama format. 

“What I am trying to reveal through photography in a deliberate yet subtle way is a sense of history. I would like my photographs to describe my relationship between the tangible and the imagined, between fact and fiction. I’m a born traveler and adventurer, and an obsessive collector and observer of landscape, attempting to twist what the camera faithfully describes into something of fiction.”

“The extended sweep of the panorama allows me to draw on multiple levels, much as cinema does, and to take something of the immediate present, and layer that with something from a few centuries before. The large format camera can draw the particular in minute detail. Like adjectives in a sentence, they allow the viewer to look closer, engaging them in the little world contained by the frame.”

The Yale MFA grad and Guggenheim fellowship winner has exhibited her work in galleries and museums all over the country, and now the Gitterman Gallery is pleased to be added to the list as part of releasing Conner’s latest book. Opening reception will be on September 10th, from 6-8 pm, while the exhibit will conclude November 15th.

For More Information: Gitterman Gallery

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