BWGallerist

Preview: Skēnē by Alex Majoli, & Wegee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 21, 2017 at 10:36 am
Alex-majoli-scene-6404

Scene #6404, Cairo, Egypt, Celebrating Mubarak’s resignation in Tahir Square, February 11, 2001, Alex Majoli

Howard Greenberg Gallery is bracing against the February cold with a pair of exciting exhibitions, featured the beloved Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and Alex Majoli.

Alex Majoli:

Alex Majoli (b. Ravenna, Italy, 1971) attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, and while at school traveled to Yugoslavia a number of times to document political conflicts. He graduated in 1991. Three years later, his career began after he photographed the closing of a notorious asylum on the island of Leros in Greece, which resulted in his first monograph entitled Leros. In 1995, Majoli went to South America for several months, photographing a variety of subjects for his ongoing series on Brazil, Tudo Bom. He began the series Hotel Marinum in 1998 documenting life in harbor cities around the world. Also that year, he began making a series of short films and documentaries.

Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theatre. Majoli is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, and the show is his first gallery exhibition in New York City. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Weegee:

As a photographer and photojournalist, Arthur Fellig (Weegee) was in his own words “spellbound by the mystery of murder.” His uncanny ability to make early appearances at scenes of violence and catastrophe earned him the name Weegee (appropriated from the Ouija board). His film noir style and dry wit combined with his sensational images of the naked city, often taken at night with a strong flash, have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th century.

Among the highlights in the exhibition will be a 1936 self portrait of Weegee getting his own mug shot at a police station. A series of portraits of people looking up in the sky from 1945 depicts children, a police officer, a man with a telescope, and a nun all watching a fire. A 1943 image entitled The Critic, depicts a disdainful onlooker checking out two ornately dressed women on their way to the opera. A touching photograph from c. 1944 shows two animal caretakers sleeping next to a pen with two giraffes at Madison Square Garden.

Both exhibitions are now open and will conclude on the most foolish of days, April 1st.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Daily Self-Portraits, Melissa Shook, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 15, 2017 at 11:49 pm

Melissa Shook

The idea of taking a photo of yourself each day is now commonplace. Many people do it anyway without thinking, due to the advent of smartphone cameras. But how long could you keep it up? Two months? Six? A year? How about 45 years? Then you’d be in Melissa Shook’s territory.

In 1972, curious about the problem of identity, Shook began an ambitious project of photographing herself everyday for a year. The sum of this impressive undertaking resulted in a compelling set of intimately scaled black and white photographs that range from the artist performing for the camera, to the camera describing the physicality of her being. These early influential photographs will be complimented with a selection of recent daily photographs from 2014-15 that combine individual text entries with a self-portrait image; both text and image act as a diary, reflecting upon the complexities of the human condition. Along with her daily portraits, the gallery will be exhibiting a collection of her extended portraits of her daughter Krissy in her teen years, and a compilation of her video pieces. The exhibition in its entirety explores notions of change and aging, as well as photography’s ability to form an extended document to reveal these qualities.

A photographer, video artist, and writer, Melissa Shook has taught photography at the Creative Photography Lab, at MIT and at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Shook’s photographs have been exhibited in numerous solo and prestigious group exhibitions, including: Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography (MOMA 2010) and Photography in Boston 1955-1985 (Decordova Museum). Among her awards are a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Fellowship, an Arts in Action Grant and a Polaroid Foundation Grant.

The exhibit will open February 18 with an opening reception with the artist from 6-8pm. It will be on display until March 31st.

For More Information: Joesph Bellows

Notable: Happy Posthumous Birthday Cole Weston, The Weston Legacy, Lumiere Gallery, Atlanta, GA

In Article, Exhibits on February 2, 2017 at 11:30 am

Cole Weston – Combine, Missouri, 1987

On a belated note, photographers the world over tipped their caps this week to the late Cole Weston. Weston was the youngest son of Edward Weston. He would have been 98 on January 30th.

Cole Weston, born on January 30, 1919 in Los Angeles, was the fourth and youngest son of famed 20th Century photographer, Edward Henry Weston. Cole received his first camera, a 4 by 5 Autograflex, from his brother Brett in 1935. Cole graduated with a degree in theater arts from the Cornish School in Seattle in 1937 and then served in the Navy during World War II as a welder and photographer. After his discharge from the Navy in 1945 Cole worked for Life Magazine. In 1946 he moved to Carmel to assist his father Edward. During this time Eastman Kodak started sending their new color film, Kodachrome, for Edward to try out. Cole took this opportunity to experiment with this new medium and eventually became one of the world’s great masters of fine art color photography. In 1957 Cole began shooting his first color photographs of the magnificent Big Sur coast, Monterey Peninsula and central California. At this time he carried on his own portrait business while assisting his ailing father, who passed away in 1958. Edward had authorized Cole to print from Edward’s negatives after his death, so Cole continued printing Edward’s work while pursuing his own fine art photography.

In 1988 after three decades devoted to printing his father’s work, Cole at last set aside his responsibility to Edward’s legacy and refocused on his own photography. Cole had his first solo exhibition in San Francisco in 1971. Since then, his work has been featured in more than sixty exhibitions worldwide and has been collected by museums throughout the United States and Europe. His work has been featured in numerous gallery shows and publications with three monographs and numerous articles having been published on his exquisite photography. Michael Hoffman from Aperture Publications once quoted, “In the history of photography there are but a few masters of color photography, Cole Weston is assuredly one of these masters of the medium whose dramatic powerful images are a source of great joy and pleasure”. Cole passed away from natural causes on April 20th, 2003.

The Lumiere Gallery is featuring Cole as part of a unique look at the Weston family’s contribution to photography. A virtual gallery is available on their website.

For More Information: Lumiere Gallery