BWGallerist

Notable: Oliver Klink Featured in Light And Shadow Magazine (issue 3)

In Books on May 16, 2018 at 11:51 am

Our friend Oliver Klink was recently featured in Light and Shadow, providing tips on how to be a better black and white photographer, along with providing some incredible photographs to boot. From the article:

Black and White (B&W) was once the only means we had to communicate photographically. It was a very romantic medium, eternalized by the likes of Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Weston, Minor White, Henri Cartier Bresson, Yousuf Karsh, Ansel Adams and many more. Today, even with thedominance of color images, especially on social media, monochromatic photography is making a strong resurgence. When properly composed, B&W photos look even more captivating and stunning than their color equivalent, enabling the viewer to focus on the subject, emotion and timelessness of the image.

B&W is easier and simpler to do than ever. Yet, for some, it’s just as complicated and difficult as ever. So what do you need to understand in order to produce a great monochromatic image?

LIGHTING, SHAPES, PATTERNS,
AND TEXTURES
A B&W photo breaks these fundamentals
down to their basics, and is not hindered by
the distraction and complexity that color can
sometimes contribute. Elements like trees,
fences, roads, and people draw viewers into the
photo and lead them to the subject matter. B&W
photos are at their most interesting when distinct
textures and patterns dominate the image…

To read the rest of the article and check out Light & Shadow as a whole, you can see the the magazine here.

Preview: Photograms | Literary, Wendy Paton, Artsource Loft, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on May 14, 2018 at 10:43 am

#46 Photograms  Literary©Wendy Paton

One of the great beauties of photography is the unique perspective photographers can create within this flexible medium. Such is the case with Wendy Paton’s latest exhibition at Artsource International at the Artsource Loft in New York City where Paton’s works, are curated as “Photograms | Literary”. The collection takes special advantage of the visual architectural elements of books, and are presented in an almost ethereal light. These Black and White visual constructs are indeed unique.

The exhibition features an extensive selection of Paton’s series of dynamic, gelatin silver Photograms using the literary and artistic world of books as her subject.
Utilizing the age-old photographic process also known as camera-less photography, the artist has created a visual language that metamorphose a literal and literary object, the book, into an interpretation of artistic abstraction. Paton boldly emphasizes the contrast of the printed word on paper and the fast conquering digital form, rapidly changing both the literary and photographic mediums. “As printed books are fading from our lives, being replaced by the digital medium, so is the gelatin silver photograph being replaced by our mobile phones and digital photographic technology.”

#54 Photograms Literary©Wendy Paton

Paton’s new book “Photograms l Literary, FLIGHT”, a limited edition, signed and numbered artist book (pub. Brilliant – Press, USA) will be introduced at the opening with the artist in attendance.

Wendy Paton is an award winning American photographer best known for her dramatic black & white, candid, nocturnal portraits, first seen in her series and monograph, Visages de Nuit. Paton’s work, including selections of Photograms l Literary, has been exhibited in solo U.S. and international gallery and museum exhibitions. Her photographs are included in the the permanent collections of the Bibliotheque Nationale de France – Spallart Collection, Austria – Musee de la Photographie, Belgium – James A. Michener Art Museum, U.S. – International Center of Photography, NY,U.S. – Lumiere Brothers Center of Photography, Moscow – Personal Collection of Prince Albert II of Monaco, and many notable private collections.

The exhibit will be opening May 17th and concluding on June 30th. 

For More Information: Artsource Loft

Preview: 2018 Josephine Herrick Project Cocktail Party and Auction

In Auction on May 10, 2018 at 11:00 am
Mick Jagger and the Rolling Stones in concert.

Mick Jagger and The Stones at Madison Square Garden, November 27, 1969. By Harry Benson via Josephine Herrick Project

Founded in 1941, New York City’s Josephine Herrick Project has made it their mission to promote well being for veterans, at-risk youth and special needs individuals by enriching their lives through the magic of photography. This June, the group will be once again holding its spring cocktail party and photography auction.

Peter Hurley, known for his headshots of the famous and soon to be famous, will take portraits in a studio set up at the event, a new fundraising element added to this year’s benefit. The evening also includes special recognition of The VII Agency, the storied photo agency known for its uncompromising photojournalism

Tickets are $150 ($110 tax deductible). A sitting with Peter Hurley is $300, with only a limited number available. Tickets and sittings must be booked in advance at jhproject.org. Proceeds from the evening will be used to help expand Josephine Herrick Project (JHP) services throughout the Northeast. The organization was honored in 2017 with the Lucie Humanitarian Award for its use of photography for good, the first non-profit organization to receive this prestigious honor.

Christie’s auctioneer Rachel Orkin-Ramey will conduct the live auction, presenting photographs by award-winning photographers and those whose work is in private collections and museums. Additional prints will be offered in the event’s silent auction.

“This year, we are especially pleased to be shining a spotlight on The VII Agency,” stated Jessica Wanamaker, executive director of Josephine Herrick Project. “Our two organizations share a common purpose and goal in wanting to use photography to tell stories that change the world.”

The event will take place on June 5th at Aperture Gallery, 547 West 27th Street in New York.

For More Information: The Josephine Herrick Project