Notable: Reverence, Jeffrey Conley, Book Release at Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

In Books, Gallery on March 22, 2018 at 11:04 am

Waterfall, Southern Alps, NZ, by Jeffrey Conley

For fans of Jeffrey Conley, the next event at Peter Fetterman Gallery at the end of this month is sure to be a can’t miss.

Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to celebrate the launch of Jeffrey Conley’s new book, “Reverence” on Saturday, March 31, 2018, from 3 to 6 PM. This event presents a unique opportunity to meet the distinguished American fine art landscape photographer in person while he discusses his recent body of work.

Signed books, published by Nazraeli Press in association with Peter Fetterman Gallery, can be purchased at the event for $75.00 USD; they are also available on our website. The corresponding photography exhibition for “Reverence” has been extended in the gallery till June 9, 2018, so we invite you to visit this beautiful body of work if you haven’t done so already.

Again, for those who are interested in the event, it will be Saturday afternoon from 3-6pm, March 31st.

For More Information: Peter Fetterman Gallery

Preview: Robert Bechtle, Gladstone 64, NYC

In Gallery on March 19, 2018 at 10:33 am

Image via Gladstone 64

For many photographers, the drawings of artists part of the photorealism movement can be equally as captivating as images captured through the lens of a camera. Gladstone 64 is now exhibiting one of the movements pioneers, Robert Bechtle, to start the spring.

 An early pioneer of the Photorealist movement, Bechtle has worked for nearly 60 years visualizing a characteristically American setting through depictions of friends, family and streetscapes in his native San Francisco Bay Area. This exhibition focuses on Bechtle’s charcoal drawings that illustrate the residential streets of Alameda, and pays special attention to those which complement light and shadow, architecture and automobile with distinct photographic precision. In this latest body of works, Bechtle demonstrates his deeply attuned and uncanny personal approach to documenting contemporary American culture with extraordinary accuracy.

Created in 2016 and 2017, Bechtle’s new series of drawings captures an indiscernibly timeless view of northern Californian suburban life. Composed with sharp attention to detail, modest visual clues shed light on the contrasting soft and delicate quality of these charcoal drawings while new vantage points offer equally distinct shifts to the far right or left of these frameworks. Alameda, the recurring city in these works and in Bechtle’s oeuvre altogether, is alluded to through his inclusion of small bungalow homes and globe-topped streetlamps, which originated in this particular municipality in the early 20th-century. Bechtle spent many of his early years in Alameda, and he captures this community and landscape through incisive, square-format drawings that glimpse more deeply into the banal and the all too often overlooked. By illustrating multiple perspectives of this city through monochromatic drawings, Bechtle quietly shapes the pauses and shadows that find or leave us and displays how photography, memory and personal history influence these meticulous compositions.

Often inspired by his own photographs, Bechtle’s intimate drawings demonstrate his astute and cinematographic vision, through each work’s methodically framed compositions and through his unequivocal attention to capturing divergent forms of natural light. Bechtle’s drawings appear like stills from a noir film, quietly examining forlorn, desolate sidewalks and vacant cars that line unidentified streets. This psychological dramaticism is reiterated through sharp and exacting image crops, which force the viewer into a condensed and eerie narrative showing no evidence of who or what might occupy the space outside these scenes he presents. Bechtle is also able to masterfully recreate morning, afternoon and evening light, heightening the palpable realism he captures in these constructed narratives, providing a glimpse into his ever explorative eye.

The exhibition will be available until April 21st, 2018.

For More Information: Gladstone 64

Preview: 20th Annual Krappy Kamera Award Winners, Exhibited by Soho Photo, NYC, NY

In Gallery on March 6, 2018 at 10:59 am

For 20 years know, the International Krappy Kamera Competition has instilled a certain joie de vivre for the beauty of photography made with, you guessed it, a cheap camera. Further reinforcing the fact that it is more the person behind the lens than the lens itself, the Krappy Kamera Competition has spawned incredible photos on an annual basis. And just like years before, Soho Photo Gallery is happy to exhibit the award winners.

The gallery is proud to present its annual Krappy Kamera Exhibition, including the winners of the 2018 International Competition, and exhibits by Soho Photo Gallery artists, photographer Jean Miele and former winners of previous Krappy Kamera Competitions. The Competition originated at Soho Photo Gallery in 1998 and is one of the high points of the year.
Sandra Carrion, the competition’s juror, created Krappy Kamera. She is a former president of Soho Photo Gallery and a founding member of fotofoto gallery in Huntington, Long Island. Carrion is also the co-founder of Image Factory Experimental Photography Workshops.
“It has always been interesting to me that so many photographers are lugging their toy, plastic and homemade cameras with them to exotic lands. This year was no different. Images from many parts of the world were represented in a variety of treatments. From literal to experimental these artists breathed new life into everyday imagery from around the globe.”
The exhibit opens today, March 6th with a reception from 6pm-8pm, but the official exhibits dates are March 7th through March 31st.
For More Information: Krappy Kamera at Soho Photo