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Preview: Route 66 Motels, John Schott, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 19, 2017 at 10:56 am

Ringing in the new year, Joseph Bellows Gallery has decided to start things with pure Americana, brought to you through the eyes of photographer John Schott.

In the summer of 1973, John Schott drove Route 66 from the Midwest to California and back, sleeping in his pick-up truck and photographing with an 8 x 10 inch Deardorf view camera. Among his subjects were the motels situated along this expanse of highway.

Route 66 Motels will present a key set of vintage prints that formed Schott’s series of topographic views of these small motels that punctuate this highway landscape, both in daylight and under the glow of artificial illumination. In this collection of vernacular forms, Schott describes a particular architectural structure, within a specific era, while subtly reminding his viewers that the road and its adjacent dwellings are part of what defines the landscape.

In 1975 he received an Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the National Endowment for the Arts. That same year he was included in William Jenkins’ seminal exhibition at the George Eastman House, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape. In 2009 a reexamination of this exhibition organized Britt Salvesen toured to numerous museum venues including: the Center for Creative Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume, Paris and Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, Bilbao.

 

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Classic Photographs by Ansel Adams & Celebrating William Garnett at 100, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 15, 2017 at 1:31 pm
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Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958, Ansel Adams

For years, Scott Nichols Gallery has been one of the foremost purveyors of Black and White photography in San Francisco. Drawing on their particular love of the American landscape, the SNG’s Little Gallery is featuring the works of Ansel Adams and William Garnett, the latter of whom is being posthumously celebrated for his 100th birthday; Garnett passed away in 2006.

The pair is an appropriate juxtaposition due to their focus in photography and general love of the environment. Adams has long been celebrated as a pioneer in photographing the American West. Born in 1902 , Adams was one of the founders of Group f/64 with Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston.

As a long time collector of Group f/64, Scott Nichols Gallery will be pulling together a wide assortment of Adams photographs that are part of its collection.

Garnett, born in 1916 in Chicago, Illinois, made his name initially as an independent graphic designer and commercial photographer. What he’s best known for however is it work on the American landscape, like Adams. But unlike Adams, who focused especially on forestry, Garnett’s work was aerial. Over the years, his works were published in magazines such as Fortune, Life and Reader’s Digest.

The Exhibition will be open to visitors until February 25th, 2017.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Notable: George Eastman Museum Fundraiser

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 5, 2017 at 5:50 pm

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“The rich man never really gives anything, he only distributes part of the surplus.
It is the person of moderate means who really gives.” 
-George Eastman
It’s the time of celebrating with loved ones and a time for rebirth. It’s also a time for giving to good causes, which donating to the George Eastman museum is in spades.
Entrepreneur George Eastman (1854–1932), the pioneer of popular photography, completed his Colonial Revival mansion on East Avenue in Rochester in 1905 and resided there until his death. He bequeathed most of his assets to the University of Rochester, expressing a desire that his mansion serve as the residence for the university president. The large house, measuring 35,000 square feet, proved far too large for this purpose, especially without a large service staff.

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the State of New York chartered George Eastman House Inc. as an independent nonprofit educational institution—specifically, a museum of photography and allied pursuits created as a memorial to George Eastman. The next year, the University of Rochester donated Eastman’s mansion and surrounding property to the museum. The institution altered its name several times over the ensuing decades, but its mission has remained steadfast: to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit photographic and cinematic objects and related technology from the inception of each medium to the present.

At the museum’s opening in 1949, it was one of only two American museums with a photography department and one of only two American museums with a film department (the Museum of Modern Art also had both). In 1951, the museum opened the beautiful Dryden Theatre, with seating for more than five hundred people, to exhibit films.

The George Eastman museum is still running strong, but it needs help, just like any non-profit. If you’re a photography lover – if you’re reading this chances are good that you are – consider a donation to the museum today.

For More Information and to Donate: George Eastman Museum