BWGallerist

Notable: Deadline Approaches for 2018 National Alternative Processes Competition, SohoPhotoGallery

In Contest on August 17, 2018 at 4:53 pm
lauren jones photograph 2017 NAPC winner

2017 Winning Image by Lauren Jones

For those who’ve been procrastinating and need a last second reminder, time is running out! The annual National Alternative Processes Competition deadline for entries is August 27th.

Alternative processes include, but are not limited to: Albumen, Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, Platinum/ Palladium, Gum Bichromate, Bromoil, Salt Print, Tintype, Ziatype, Daguerreotype, Image Transfers, Liquid Emulsion, Photogravure, Chemigram, as well as handmade prints created from digital negatives.Traditional silver gelatin prints, C-prints and digital prints are not eligible.
Juror: Dan Burkholder is a photographer, author and teacher. He wrote the groundbreaking book Making Digital Negatives for Contact Printing and has led the mobile photography revolution with his book iPhone Artistry. He combines twentieth century technology with nineteenth century printing processes.
Eligibility: Open to photographers who are residents of the United States over the age of 18, excluding members of Soho Photo Gallery.
Awards: First, second and third place and honorable mentions will be awarded.
Learn more about the competition, or if you’re ready right now, enter below.
To Enter the Competition: SohoPhoto

Preview: Stay Cool, Anthony Friedkin, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Gallery on August 13, 2018 at 11:00 am
large wave face in sun by Anthony Friendkin

Large Wave Face in Sun, Zuma Beach, CA, 2000, by Anthony Friedkin via Joseph Bellows Gallery

The dog days of summer will get anybody down, but true beach bums will swoon at the chance to catch the perfect wave. For ocean lovers, surf aficionados, and black and white photography lovers, Joseph Bellows exhibit of transcendental wave photos are worth a look.

Anthony Friedkin’s tonally rich black and white images of the Pacific Ocean depict the force and the quietude of its waveforms. Each wave is pictured isolated and unique, while suggesting the larger context of the surrounding ocean. The resulting photographs reveal the momentum, formal beauty and reflective grace of the surf.

As one looks at the photographs, it becomes clear that the artist is observing and understanding the waves as both photographer and surf rider. The images included in the exhibition are part of a larger project that spans several decades of recording the ocean and its culture.

Friedkin’s photographs are in the collections of numerous institutions including: the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Museum of Modern Art. Monographs by Friedkin include: Time Keeper (2003) and the Gay Essay (2014), both with introductions by Julian Cox.

Anthony Friedkin’s aquatic essay will be up with other summer selections at Joseph Bellows through the end of August.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Stone Walls, Mariana Cook, Deborah Bell Photography, NYC

In Gallery on August 3, 2018 at 10:45 am

Our friends at Deborah Bell Photography have yet another superb exhibition on their hands, this time kicking off fall with the works of Mariana Cook.

In her series STONE WALLS, Cook examines one of man’s earliest and most
enduring methods of defining territories: the stone wall. Sculptural and
practical, majestic and humble, Cook’s photographs of dry stone walls capture a fundamental relationship between human beings and the landscape.
STONE WALLS was conceived by Mariana Cook, the last protégé of Ansel
Adams, at her home on Martha’s Vineyard on the day before Thanksgiving 2002.
After 56 cows strayed through a crumbling section of the stone wall she shares with her neighbor, Cook studied the tumbled wall and was struck by its beauty.
With that inspiration, Cook spent the next eight years traveling to farms, towns,
and temples in Peru, Great Britain, Ireland, the Mediterranean, New England,
and Kentucky in pursuit of dry stone walls.

The striking black-and-white photographs on view portray the wall in landscape, the wall in abstract form, and the return of rocks to nature. Cook is fascinated with the juxtaposition of stones and geometric composition, as well as with the resonance among walls of different cultures. The walls were photographed by Cook between 2002 and 2010 and were built as early as 3600 B.C. Dry stone walls—those constructed without the use of mortar with stones skillfully selected and placed to ensure strength and durability—are slowly falling into disrepair or being removed from the landscape. Cook writes, “The walls collapse and are replaced by concrete blocks, wire or wooden fences…. The self sufficient family life and closeness bred by the farm is disappearing with its walls.”

The exhibit will have an opening reception on Wednesday, Sept. 5th, from 6-8 pm, while officially running from September 6th until October 27th, 2018.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs