BWGallerist

On site: “Pauses” (Unplugged), Photographs by Dominique Philippe Bonnet, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 1, 2016 at 2:00 pm

Pause 10 by Dominique  Bonnet

Pause 10, Dominique Philippe Bonnet

As far as he’s concerned, D. P. Bonnet is quite sensitive about the passing of time.

“It seems to me that we are in life like runners. During the race, one sees the environment like a trail which is more or less hazy or multi-colored. I use photography to capture our world in motion and show how this world is a succession of scenes generating emotions, but whose shades often seem to escape one’s conscious feeling, as it’s too ephemeral.”

His series of photographic meditations are worthy of your stopping off from a busy day.

Now through December 31.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Deborah Turbeville, Deborah Bell Photographs

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 26, 2016 at 12:18 am

DTF-Installation_17.jpg

In 2013, the world lost one of its most keen eyes and talented people behind the lens in Deborah Turbeville. She was a savant in the world of fashion photography and influenced countless people the followed. Deborah Bell Photographs will celebrate the holidays with a retrospective of Turbeville’s work.

Turbeville is known for her iconoclastic fashion photographs, elaborate tableaux that depict brooding, introspective models wearing haute-couture clothing and posed in barren, desolate settings. Her pictures were widely published in the editorial pages of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Essence, Nova, Mirabella, The New York Times Magazine, and other major publications. Advertising clients included Comme des Garçons, Ralph Lauren, Valentino and Calvin Klein; and department stores such as Barney’s, Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue. A former fashion editor for the The Ladies Home Journal, Harper’s Bazaar and Mademoiselle, Turbeville began taking photographs in the 1960s; however, she had no formal training until 1966 when she enrolled in a six-month photography workshop given by Richard Avedon and the art director Marvin Israel. As Turbeville told The New York Times in 1981, “If it hadn’t been for the two of them, I wouldn’t have taken my photography seriously.” Another mentor was Gösta Peterson whose free-form approach with animated models greatly inspired Turbeville. She also acknowledged the influence of European films of the 1970s, especially those by Bertolucci and Antonioni.

Turbeville was not only prolific and internationally published as an image-maker, but was also a maverick printmaker. She used unusual papers, experimented with toning and alternative processes, and intentionally scratched her negatives. Never in search of the pristine object, she strove instead for imperfection and a sense of timelessness. She often constructed collages of photographs that are either pinned or taped to hand-made paper, imbuing the works with a sense of decay and enabling their deterioration. Throughout her career Turbeville traveled widely and concentrated on many themes in addition to fashion. The many books she published from her œuvre include Wallflower (1978); Women on Women (1979); Unseen Versailles (1982); Les amoureuses du temps passé (1987); Newport Remembered with Louis Auchincloss (1994); Studio St. Petersburg (1997); Le passé imparfait (2009); Casa No Name (2009); and Deborah Turbeville: The Fashion Pictures (2011).

The exhibit will  conclude on January 28th, 2017.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Preview: Scranton Notorious, Curated by Bernie Andreoli from the Collection of Nick Petula, CameraWork Gallery, Scranton, PA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 16, 2016 at 10:04 am

Mug Shot from Collection of Nick Petula

Prison photographs, or mug shots, hold a unique place in portrait photography. While many portraits are taken and published with the permission of the subject – and often highlight a person in a presentable state – there’s no choice for the subject in prison. Is a mug shot representative of someone in their most candid state? If not, it’s a least a prime low point for any individual. CameraWork gallery will be delving into the medium with their latest exhibit: Mug Shots from the collection of Nick Petula, curated by Bernie Andreoli.

Curator’s Statement:

The spark for this show began three years ago when my friend Nick Petula asked me to scan part of his collection of 100-year-old Scranton Police Department mug shots.  They intrigued me.   I couldn’t get the images, descriptions of the criminals and description of crimes out of my head.  The images are wonderful examples of basic informational portraits yet they appear to have been made by a true photographic artist.  The frontal image with an expressionless stare and piercing eyes and the casual profile belie the reason for the images to be made.  A meld of art, history and the foibles of man.

The exhibit will  conclude December 30th.

For More Information: CameraWork Gallery