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Notable: Lisa Lindamood Wins 2019 Krappy Kamera Competition

In Contest on March 11, 2019 at 11:00 am

Lisa Lindamood, First Place, image via Soho Photo Gallery

Soho Photo Gallery has announced the winner of its 2019 Krappy Kamera competition as Lisa Lindamood. A native Tennessean, she has been creating handmade photos for two decades. Marky Kauffmann was awarded second, while Denise Moore came in third.

What Is Krappy Kamera
Our philosophy at Soho Photo Gallery is that in the hands of any artist great photographs can be made with basic equipment. To explore this talent, we are searching for extraordinary photographs made with lousy lenses.  Examples of some Krappy Kameras are the Holga, Diana, Ansco, and pinhole cameras. You can also create your own Krappy Kamera by using your non-Krappy Kamera (e.g. 4×5, SLR, DSLR) and exchanging the lens with a Krappy Lens (e.g. pinhole body cap or Holga-type lens). Cell phones, disposables and point and shoot cameras are ineligible. Remember, just because a camera is old and moldy doesn’t make it Krappy. The lens is the determining factor.

The competition was juried by Michelle Bates, internationally renowned for her Holga imagery since 1991 and author of Plastic Cameras: Toying with Creativity, an extensive look at the use and history of toy cameras.

Soho Photo Gallery will be exhibiting photos from the competition through the end of March.

For More Information: Soho Photo Krappy Kamera 2019

“The Tree In Me”, Photographs by Howard Brunner, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Fine Art, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 1, 2019 at 6:49 pm

Tree 09 by Howard Brunner

Tree 09, Howard Brunner

Alright, the artist has a thing for “Trees”. But after moving through these beautiful images, you understand the meditative approach this veteran photographer, Howard Brunner, takes in capturing little vignettes of nature touching us.

I’ve loved trees all of my life. I had the great good fortune to grow up on a Pennsylvania farm with a wide variety of trees adjacent to our house. We also had a small bit of wild woods on one corner of our property. I have never lost my boyish, joyous fascination, and appreciation of trees. I photograph trees to convey those feelings. For me, photographing a tree is an act of love and gratitude.
Now through March 31.
To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Alfred Eisenstaedt: Portraits of the Past & Alfred Stieglitz: Camera Work (1903-1917), Robert Mann Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on February 25, 2019 at 11:01 am
3 photos by alfred stieglitz

Alfred Stieglitz via Robert Mann Gallery

Few people have had as pronounced an impact on the early era of their medium like Alfred Stieglitz and Afred Eisenstaedt. Robert Mann Gallery approaches spring this March with a special exhibit of both.

Alfred Eisenstaedt was born 1898 in Dirschau, West Prussia. In 1906 his family moved to Berlin where he studied music, received his first camera, an Eastman Kodak Number Three, and used his parents bathroom for a makeshift dark room. Eisenstaedt was drafted into the German army after the outbreak of WW1 and served at the front lines in Flanders until April 1918, enemy fire crippled both his legs, yet thankfully his life was spared. After the war, he worked as a salesman, but continually found success with assignments as a freelance photographer. His first major mission was covering Thomas Mann accepting the Nobel Prize in literature in 1929. Eisenstaedt came under the influence of photographer Erich Salomon and his work regularly found its way into Die Dame, Berliner Illustrierte, The Graphic, The London Illustrated News and many other magazines.

One of the earliest methods of reproducing photographic images in ink, the photogravure process was perfected and championed by Stieglitz.  Images pulled off of etched copper plates that were made directly from the original negatives possessed rich mid tones and soft blacks, rendering velvety prints with a tonal range Stieglitz often preferred to the more typical darkroom processes.  The photogravures for Camera Work were hand-pulled by Stieglitz himself, many were printed on delicate Japanese tissue and carefully tipped into the pages of the quarterly journal.  This exhibition will include a selection of Stieglitz’s many iconic images in the photogravure medium that originally hale from the pages of Camera Work.  Quintessential masterpieces such as The Steerage andSpring Showers will be on view.

Both exhibits will be available to the public starting March 7th and conclude April 27th, 2019.

For More Information: Robert Mann Gallery