BWGallerist

Preview: Anthony Hernandez, Pritzker Center for Photography, San Francisco MoMA, San Francisco, CA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 25, 2016 at 12:59 pm
Public-Fishing-Anthony-Hernandez

Public Fishing Areas #31, Anthony Hernandez

Do you think that Los Angeles is all sunshine and daisies, David Copperfield and Brad Pitt? The city has certainly embraced its glamorous side and projected it to the rest of the world. But for veteran photographer Anthony Hernandez, son of Mexican working-class immigrants, L.A. has been a lifelong environment of poverty. In his new exhibition, the first solo exhibition and the new Pritzker Center of Photography, Hernandez’s work provides a retrospective on the City of Angels’ pockets of desolation.

Anthony Hernandez is the first retrospective to honor the more than 45-year career of this major American photographer. Featuring approximately 160 photographs — many never shown before — the exhibition includes a remarkably varied body of work united by its formal beauty and its subtle consideration of contemporary social issues. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Anthony Hernandez developed his own individual style of street photography, one attuned to the desolate allure and sprawling expanses of his hometown. Over the course of his career, he has deftly moved from black-and-white to color photography, from 35mm to large-format cameras, and from the human figure to the landscape to abstracted detail. Highlights from the exhibition include black-and-white photographs from the early 1970s taken on the streets of downtown L.A., color pictures made on Rodeo Drive in the mid-1980s, and selections from his critically acclaimed series Landscapes for the Homeless, completed in 1991. Although Hernandez has turned his lens on other cities — including Rome, Italy, and various American locales — Los Angeles, and especially the regions inhabited by the working class, the poor, and the homeless, has been his most enduring subject.

The exhibit is now open and will be available to view until January 1st, 2017.

For More Information: SF MoMA

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: