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Archive for the ‘Black and White Photography’ Category

Notable: Oliver Klink, 2nd Place- Merit of Excellence in the Professional Silhouette Category, 12th Annual Black & White Spider Awards

In Black and White Photography, Photographer on November 7, 2017 at 11:00 am

Oliver Klink, Ancient Farming, Piezography Ink, 2015 (Image via Oliver Klink, Copyrighted ©)

We are happy to announce that our friend Oliver Klink has won 2nd Place-Merit of Excellence for “Ancient Farming” in the Professional Silhouette Category during the 12th Annual Black & White Spider Awards. The Spider Awards is an annual international award competition honoring the best amateur and professional images in black and white photography. Klink’s “Ancient Farming” was creating using the digital printing process Piezography. The image was photographed in China in 2015 and is a part of Klink’s larger body of work titled “Consequences”.

Consequences:

The transition from a pre-modern or traditional to a modern society is frequently described as modernization. Modernization has had the consequences of diminishing the relevance of old world customs, rituals, familial and social relationships.

“Consequences” addresses the current threats to natural and cultural diversity, sites where modernity, tradition, and wild lands collide. It is an elegy for what is vanishing and a celebration of those cultures on the fringe of modern society resilient enough to maintain their vibrance.

As we drift toward a blandly amorphous, generic world, as cultures disappear and life becomes more uniform, we as a people and a species, and Earth itself, are deeply impoverished. The images take the viewer on a roller coaster ride of aesthetic of disappearance, with hope that the fading traditions are not permanent and irreversible.

-Oliver Klink

Congratulations again to our friend for his achievement. For more information on Oliver Klink and his work, please visit Oliver Klink Photography

On site: "Urban Night", Photographs by Allen Shifrin, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 1, 2017 at 7:05 am

Conservatory by Allen Shifrin

Conservatory, Allen Shifrin

Black and White photography highlights a dramatic scene through the balance of light and shadow. Surround the same scene in the dark veil of night and the drama is further heightened.

This series of photographs reflects my interest in landscape photography, with an emphasis on the urban landscape.  The subject matter is the scene that unfolds at night, where composition is informed as much by shadow as by artifact.

November 1 through November 30

To view the exhibition: Allen Shifrin

Notable: 2018 International Portfolio Competition, SohoPhotoGallery

In Black and White Photography, Contest, Gallerist on October 30, 2017 at 11:15 am

Are you interested in becoming the next great photographer to be displayed at SohoPhotoGallery? For years, the gallery’s Portfolio Review Committee has juried thousands of photographers’ portfolios, resulting in some brilliant contemporary photography to see the light of day.

ABOUT THE COMPETITION
Located in lower Manhattan, Soho Photo, New York
City’s longest-running photography gallery is awarding
solo shows to three winning photographers. The
panel of jurors will make their initial selections based
on digital submissions. Final selections will be based
on prints.
SUBMISSION
Digital entries must be uploaded at <callforentry.
org> where you will find instructions for submitting.
The competition is open to all photographers age 18
or older, excluding members of Soho Photo Gallery.
Any photographic print medium is acceptable. One
portfolio per photographer, please.
WHAT IS A PORTFOLIO?
A portfolio contains 12-20 compositionally and
technically strong images, with a consistent theme or
topic.
THE JURORS
Members of Soho Photo Gallery’s Portfolio Review
Committee will jury the competition. The committee
has reviewed thousands of portfolios since the
gallery’s beginning in 1971. In so doing, the gallery has
exhibited prints by some of the finest contemporary
photographers throughout the world.

If you’re one of the handful wanting the chance to display their work, submissions will be accepted until January 8th, 2018.

For More Information: SohoPhotoGallery

Preview: Stars, Cosmic Art from 1900 until Today, Thierry Cohen and Others, Lentos Kunstmeseum, Linz, Austria

In Black and White Photography on October 9, 2017 at 11:00 am
Starry sky and fountain scene by thierry cohen

Image by Thierry Cohen

Perhaps most recently best known for his “Darkened Cities” series of photographs, Thierry Cohen has been chosen as part of a special exhibit at the Lentos Kuntsmuseum in Linz, Austria.

The endless expanse of the night sky, the shimmering stars close at hand! There is no longer the dark night, the electric light has conquered her. Buildings, squares and streets are brightly lit at night. The lights of the big cities have displaced the starry sky; In the meantime, one-third of the world’s population has lost sight of the Milky Way, of shooting stars and luminous comets.

The diverse and cross-media exhibition gives an insight into the relation of man to the starry sky, which is the subject of research, of romanticism, of destiny, but also of threat scenarios. Dreaming, humorous, poetic, but also ironic, the artists of the 20th and 21st century are exploring the relationship of man to the infinity of the starry sky and are exploring the sparkle of the stars and their present loss.

For those interested in visiting the exhibit, Cohen’s work is joined by several talented artist, including Max Ernst, Philippe Gerlach, Meret Oppenheim, Iv Toshain, Roman Scheidl, and many many more. There’s plenty of time to plan your trip, as the exhibit won’t conclude until January 14th, 2018.

For More Information: Lentos Kunstmueseum

Preview: Oliver Klink, Juried Pacific Art League Exhibit, Palo Alto, CA

In Black and White Photography on October 5, 2017 at 11:00 am

Fresh from exhibition with Red Filter Gallery, our friend Oliver Klink will be part of a Juried Pacific Art League exhibit in October. Klink’s “Outlasting my Dwelling” was the participating photograph.

The Yi are the poorest Chinese minority living in the remote mountains of the Sichuan province. They strive to survive, to support each other and to protect their culture from modernization. Education, perceived as a disruption, is a path to a “better life”, but offered only to the eldest two children. The large number of younger children simply take care of their siblings. Their future, bleak at best, can rapidly take a turn for the worst.
Are their stories and situations unique? They may or may not be, but they are real. Spending time traveling thru their land, you are on an emotional roller coaster, ranging from rejection, to resentment, to intrusion. The acceptance seldom felt, reminds us that changes in life are hard to accept, that the understanding of each other’s genuine feelings takes time and should prevail over commercial cynicism.

Do their struggles invite us to remember our past, to draw parallels to the changes of our modern society? History repeats, but is forgotten until visible in front of our eyes and soul. I felt I travelled thru time and found a piece of my own history. I cared about the people I photographed, perhaps anticipating what would be next for them.

Photofiles will have until October 26th to see Klink’s and others’ photographs in Palo Alto.
For More Information: Pacific Art League

On site: "Meet Me In My Dreams", Photography by Mary Anne Mitchell, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 1, 2017 at 8:00 am

Rorschach Girls by Mary Anne Mitchell

Rorchach Girls, Mary Anne Mitchell

Inspired by poetry, the images in this exhibition draw the viewer in to another world experience.

This series is inspired by my poem ‘Meet Me in My Dreams”.  The images are created using wet plate collodion. I scan and enlarge them to enhance the organic qualities of the medium. The work speaks to family, memory, and the ethereal passage of time.

The setting for many of the images is a fairytale landscape. My use of the young people celebrates the  universal feeling of limitless potential that most people experience in their youth.The ghostlike figures are reflections of the later years when beauty and youth begin to fade.  They suggest the feeling that one is beginning to disappear and yet still present and interacting in the scene.

Now through October 31.

To view the exhibition: Mary Anne Mitchell

Preview: The Lines and The Andean Desert Survey, Edward Ranney, Deborah Bell Photographs, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Gallery on September 13, 2017 at 4:41 pm

Nazca Pampa, 1985, by Edward Ranney

Now open at Deborah Bell Photographs, experience the desolate beauty captured by Edward Ranney in Peru.

The Lines and The Andean Desert Survey will feature 17 photographs taken in Peru, where Ranney began photographing over 50 years ago. Included will be selections from his recently published book, “The Lines,” which depict markings in the Peruvian desert made by the ancient Nazcas, a relatively small culture that flourished on Peru’s southern coast from around the beginning of the Christian era until 600 AD. The purpose and meanings of these ancient geoglyphs, made by clearing the surface of the desert floor, or by creating paths of stones, remain mysterious and open to different interpretations by scholars. As Ranney explains in a preface to The Lines (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014):

“Just south of Peru’s Ingenio River Valley there is a low hill alongside the Pan-American highway. Here one can overlook the vast, confounding space of the Nazca Pampa and make out some of the lines, or geoglyphs, etched on it by the Nazca culture some fifteen hundred years ago. The lines on the pampa, particularly the figural geoglyphs, have been documented in detail over the last sixty years by aerial photographs, which have given us a broader understanding of their unique qualities. Yet in spite of the information provided by aerial views, it seems to me there is still much to be gained by seeing and experiencing the lines on ground level, as their creators did. … In addition to their perceptual qualities, the lines can be seen as a form of mapping, marking reference points and connections within the landscape, thereby transforming a harsh natural environment into an understandable, even intimate cultural space. … Important ceremonies undoubtedly took place along and within these lines. … It was also thought that the lines, trapezoids, and swept gathering places were sites of ceremonial processions and pilgrimages, and were renewed and reconfigured over many generations. It is unlikely we will ever know definitively what the geoglyphs meant to their creators. But what is clear is that they mark places – and times – of significance. This minimal landscape continues to reveal to us a fragile record of its human occupation. It is a record of elusive meaning, a unique evocation of the inalterable connection between humans and nature.”

The exhibit is now open and will be available for viewing between 11am-6pm, Tuesday through Saturday. Its conclusion will come November 4th.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Notoable: The Ansel Adams Gallery Announces New Photo Rating and Condition System

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector on September 8, 2017 at 11:00 am

When it comes to classic landscape photography, the list of recommended photographers almost always begins with Ansel Adams. As a member of Group f/64, Adams’ photos of the Pacific Northwest set the standard for striking and ethereal black & white imagery. Consequently, Adams’ photos have made themselves a part of several photography collections throughout the world. Now, the Ansel Adams Gallery has announced its own rating system for grading photographs by the deceased master.

Condition is always difficult to assess and somewhat subjective. Our rating system is an effort to make a meaningful distinction between the found condition of photographs that are, in 2017, between 35 and 85 years old. There are no standards in the industry or bright lines between ratings. Each rating can contain a range of conditions and items, and those ranges get progressively wider as conditions deteriorate. We attempt to be detailed, clear, and consistent in our assessment of the condition of photographs, but cannot guarantee that sharper eyes will not find things we miss. Our condition reports note EVERYTHING we see under a VERY rigorous examination by TRAINED experts, and we are known among our peers to be excessively detailed. These reports, on the face of it, can be disconcerting, even when the condition is rated as “Excellent”. Our rating depends on how visible damage is. Therefore it is possible that a number of items that are barely visible in glaring light can look more severe on a written condition report than would a single issue visible 3 feet away, whereas in person, the viewer might not even note the multiple items. Also, some types of surface damage could only or are most likely to have happened, intentionally or otherwise, in the artist’s studio. A small wrinkle in the emulsion layer, or etching a dark spot in a light sky are two examples. When this occurs we note it, but if it was acceptable to Ansel to release, we do not degrade the condition rating based on that. Our stance is that if it was good enough for him, who are we to negatively judge the condition.

Many issues noted here can be effectively treated with proper and qualified conservation. The cost of such treatments are generally not insignificant, and can take a considerable amount of time due to multiple passes or subsequent steps. Conservation work or evidence thereof is not a negative factor in assessing the condition or value of a print. We evaluate the current condition, not what it may have been or what it may become.

If you’re a serious collector of Adams photography, the gallery’s system is something that will seriously considered down the road. It will help guide through the print condition ratings and the quality of the layers, and also serve to educate on commonly used condition terms.

The ratings system can be found here: Ansel Adams Gallery

 

On Site: “Consequences”, Photographs by Oliver Klink, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 1, 2017 at 8:00 am

013 Ancient Farming by Oliver Klink

Ancient Farming, Oliver Klink

One of our outstanding up and coming fine art photographers is West Coast resident Oliver Klink.

Oliver’s work has been published with National Geographic, Days of Japan, Black & White magazine, Popular Photography magazine, among others. In 2016, he was selected as Critical Mass Top 50 fine art photographer, “Best of the best” emerging fine art photographer by BWgallerist, and received People’s Choice award from Black and White Magazine single image contest. In 2014, his image “Herding Instinct” won the grand prize at the Rayko International Photo contest. Oliver is a master of the new digital printing process called Piezography. Originally from Switzerland, Oliver currently resides in Los Gatos, California with his wife.

“Consequences” addresses the current threats to natural and cultural diversity, sites where modernity, tradition, and wild lands collide. It is an elegy for what is vanishing and a celebration of those cultures resilient enough to maintain their vibrancy. As we drift toward a blandly amorphous, generic world, as cultures disappear and life becomes more uniform, we as a people and a species, and Earth itself, are deeply impoverished. The images take the viewer on a roller coaster ride of aesthetic of disappearance, with hope that the fading traditions are not permanent and irreversible.

Now through September 30.

To view the exhibition: Oliver Klink

Preview: James Herbert, Gitterman Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Gallery on August 17, 2017 at 10:59 am

from “Piano” 1987, 1989, James Herbert

This fall, the Gitterman Gallery will be hosting a raw, unbridled exhibition featuring the works of James Herbert; particularly works from the late 1980s.

James Herbert’s photographs of nude young adults, seemingly lost in the intimacy of a moment, combine conceptions of film and photography with elements of art history to create images that hover between the worlds of fact and fiction, between the romantic and the real. The photographs, made of frames selected from his films, are thus the product of a collaboration between Herbert, functioning as an engaged director, and his subjects. As images, they are more poetic and symbolic than concrete, photographic allegories that draw on the visual traditions of painting.

In 1989, using black and white, and color motion picture film that he shot mostly in the 1980s, Herbert projected individual frames, one by one, on a wall, selecting specific ones that he then re-photographed with 35mm black and white film. He later enlarged the images, printing them on 16 x 20 inch paper. This process of re-photographing and then enlarging emphasized the grain of the film and created an aesthetic that mirrors the plasticity of paint. It makes the flesh palpable, in the same way that layering paint on a canvas can provide a visceral experience. He selected the frames to photograph for their still properties, thus they are not necessarily the same edit he used for the films he made from the same footage, which were also made with a re-photographic process.

Born in 1938 in Boston, Herbert grew up in Rhode Island. As a teenager he attended figure drawing classes at the Rhode Island School of Design. He received a B.A. in art history at Dartmouth College in 1960 and an M.F.A. in painting in 1962 at the University of Colorado where he studied briefly with Clyfford Still and Stan Brakhage. Herbert moved to Athens, Georgia in 1962 and taught painting and filmmaking at the University of Georgia for many years.

The exhibit will open on Thursday, September 7th with a reception running from 6 to 9pm. Those interested will have until November 4th to visit.

For More Information: Gitterman Gallery