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Archive for the ‘Exhibits’ Category

Preview: Littoral Drift, Meghann Riepenhoff, Yossi Milo Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 22, 2017 at 11:18 pm

Image via Yossi Milo Gallery

Far too often people limit their imaginations to what is conventional.That’s why the art world is so wonderful – thinking about new ways to solve and create is expected. Cyanotypes are a perfect example in photography. Historically used for low cost blueprints for engineers, the experiments of photographer Meghann Riepenhoff are anything but the norm.

 

Works from Riepenhoff’s series, Littoral Drift (2013–ongoing), are large-scale dynamic cyanotypes made in collaboration with the landscape. Rather than photographing a scene with film and camera, the artist takes direct imprints from nature. After coating sheets of paper with homemade cyanotype emulsion, she exposes them to the elements, partially submerging them in ocean waves, draping them over a tree branch during a rainstorm or burying them in snow pack. Water, sunlight and sediments, such as sand, salt, detritus and impurities, activate the photosensitive chemicals to create fluid, painterly abstractions of the landscape in Prussian blue or white. The prints’ titles indicate the location, date and conditions under which they were made, anchoring each in a specific moment in time and underscoring the performative aspect of the series.

Riepenhoff only partially fixes her cyanotypes, leaving residual photosensitive chemistry to react to light and the environment. A print’s colors may fluctuate in intensity or salt crystals may bloom on the surface of the paper, subtly changing the artwork over time. The shifting qualities of these “living” prints are both a desirable aesthetic outcome and reflect themes of impermanence, time and mutability that are consistent throughout Riepenhoff’s work.

Meghann Riepenhoff’s work has been presented in exhibitions at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA; Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN; University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; San Francisco Camerawork, San Francisco, CA; Museo de la Ciudad, Queretaro, Mexico; Photo Center Northwest, Seattle, WA; Aperture Foundation, New York, NY; and Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX, among others. Riepenhoff earned her BFA in Photography from the University of Georgia, Athens, and her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. The artist was born in 1979 in Atlanta, GA, and currently divides her time between Bainbridge Island, WA, and San Francisco, CA.

Littoral Drift is now open for view until April 29, 2017.

For More Information: Yossi Milo Gallery

Notable: Oliver Klink Featured on FeatureShoot

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 15, 2017 at 4:22 pm
Image by Oliver Klink

Image by Oliver Klink

Our friend Oliver Klink has been traveling the world and photographing its people and nuances. The results are some stunning travel photographs.

Oliver’s work has been published with National Geographic, Days of Japan, Black & White magazine, Popular Photography magazine, among others. In 2016, he was selected as Critical Mass Top 50 fine art photographer, “Best of the best” emerging fine art photographer by BWGallerist, and received People’s Choice award from Black and White Magazine single image contest. In 2014, his image “Herding Instinct” won the grand prize at the Rayko International Photo contest. In 2013, “The Great Migration” was selected as the Grand Prize winner at the 30th anniversary Spring Show Exhibit at the PhotoCentral Gallery in Hayward, CA. Other awards have included the Mike Ivanitsky award for photographic excellence (2009) and nominations at the prestigious Black & White Spider Award (2010-2016).

Recently, Klink’s work was covered by Eva Clifford of FeatureShoot.com. The article highlights how Klink has been able to preserve aspects of culture in photographs before they disappear altogether. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

By spending time with the local people, Klink was able to discover places which still manage to hold onto their traditions, and are, as of yet, unchanged. Yet, even in these remote regions, he still witnessed how modernization was beginning to seep in, bringing with it new technology and Western clothing. Although the influx of new technology does bring with it practical convenience, Klink found the elderly (especially) were reluctant to part with their traditional items, but were soon forced to let go. And early on, while people did not believe in devices such as mobile phones, Klink points out that they have now incorporated them into their daily lives in order to keep track of time and communicate with family members, who have moved to urban areas. “Living quarters are the biggest challenge,” says Klink, as “apartment buildings are growing like mushrooms to lure locals to have a better life.”

Check our FeatureShoot’s article and then keep an eye out for Klink in exhibitions this year. Most recently an exhibit concluded on February 23rd at the Pacific Art League in Palo Alto, CA.

For More Information: Oliver Klink

Preview: Conversations with the Dead, Danny Lyon, Scott Nichols Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Gallery on March 6, 2017 at 11:00 am

Cotton Picker; Ten Years, Robbery and Assault

Scott Nichols is currently holding a very special exhibition featuring the work of Danny Lyon’s, “Conversations with the Dead.”

In the 1960’s, photographer Danny Lyon explored the penitentiary system in Texas. Over the course of Lyon’s time exploring the penal system, he ingratiated himself within the culture and befriended more than one individual.

At the time of his project, Lyon had already made a name for himself as a Magnum photographer and the creator of what was dubbed “New Journalism”- spending months with only a small number of subject to create detailed extensive photo-documentaries. Previous projects included a long-term project covering the Outlaws, a notorious biker gang. 

The extensive work involved in the project is powerful to say the least. For those interested in viewing Conversations with the Dead at Scott Nichols gallery, the exhibition will be available until March 18th.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

On Site: “Conversations With Myself”, Photographs by Paula Gibson, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 1, 2017 at 1:02 am

alwaysgoesbacktothebeggining

Always Goes Back To the Beginning, Paula Gibson

London based Paula Gibson is somewhat of a mystery in her vision of a very personal world.

This selection of photographs considers reflections on love, what love feels like and the doubts that arise in the arms of second best.

To view the exhibition: Paula Gibson

Preview: Skēnē by Alex Majoli, & Wegee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 21, 2017 at 10:36 am
Alex-majoli-scene-6404

Scene #6404, Cairo, Egypt, Celebrating Mubarak’s resignation in Tahir Square, February 11, 2001, Alex Majoli

Howard Greenberg Gallery is bracing against the February cold with a pair of exciting exhibitions, featured the beloved Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and Alex Majoli.

Alex Majoli:

Alex Majoli (b. Ravenna, Italy, 1971) attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, and while at school traveled to Yugoslavia a number of times to document political conflicts. He graduated in 1991. Three years later, his career began after he photographed the closing of a notorious asylum on the island of Leros in Greece, which resulted in his first monograph entitled Leros. In 1995, Majoli went to South America for several months, photographing a variety of subjects for his ongoing series on Brazil, Tudo Bom. He began the series Hotel Marinum in 1998 documenting life in harbor cities around the world. Also that year, he began making a series of short films and documentaries.

Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theatre. Majoli is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, and the show is his first gallery exhibition in New York City. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Weegee:

As a photographer and photojournalist, Arthur Fellig (Weegee) was in his own words “spellbound by the mystery of murder.” His uncanny ability to make early appearances at scenes of violence and catastrophe earned him the name Weegee (appropriated from the Ouija board). His film noir style and dry wit combined with his sensational images of the naked city, often taken at night with a strong flash, have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th century.

Among the highlights in the exhibition will be a 1936 self portrait of Weegee getting his own mug shot at a police station. A series of portraits of people looking up in the sky from 1945 depicts children, a police officer, a man with a telescope, and a nun all watching a fire. A 1943 image entitled The Critic, depicts a disdainful onlooker checking out two ornately dressed women on their way to the opera. A touching photograph from c. 1944 shows two animal caretakers sleeping next to a pen with two giraffes at Madison Square Garden.

Both exhibitions are now open and will conclude on the most foolish of days, April 1st.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Daily Self-Portraits, Melissa Shook, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 15, 2017 at 11:49 pm

Melissa Shook

The idea of taking a photo of yourself each day is now commonplace. Many people do it anyway without thinking, due to the advent of smartphone cameras. But how long could you keep it up? Two months? Six? A year? How about 45 years? Then you’d be in Melissa Shook’s territory.

In 1972, curious about the problem of identity, Shook began an ambitious project of photographing herself everyday for a year. The sum of this impressive undertaking resulted in a compelling set of intimately scaled black and white photographs that range from the artist performing for the camera, to the camera describing the physicality of her being. These early influential photographs will be complimented with a selection of recent daily photographs from 2014-15 that combine individual text entries with a self-portrait image; both text and image act as a diary, reflecting upon the complexities of the human condition. Along with her daily portraits, the gallery will be exhibiting a collection of her extended portraits of her daughter Krissy in her teen years, and a compilation of her video pieces. The exhibition in its entirety explores notions of change and aging, as well as photography’s ability to form an extended document to reveal these qualities.

A photographer, video artist, and writer, Melissa Shook has taught photography at the Creative Photography Lab, at MIT and at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Shook’s photographs have been exhibited in numerous solo and prestigious group exhibitions, including: Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography (MOMA 2010) and Photography in Boston 1955-1985 (Decordova Museum). Among her awards are a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Fellowship, an Arts in Action Grant and a Polaroid Foundation Grant.

The exhibit will open February 18 with an opening reception with the artist from 6-8pm. It will be on display until March 31st.

For More Information: Joesph Bellows

Notable: Happy Posthumous Birthday Cole Weston, The Weston Legacy, Lumiere Gallery, Atlanta, GA

In Article, Exhibits on February 2, 2017 at 11:30 am

Cole Weston – Combine, Missouri, 1987

On a belated note, photographers the world over tipped their caps this week to the late Cole Weston. Weston was the youngest son of Edward Weston. He would have been 98 on January 30th.

Cole Weston, born on January 30, 1919 in Los Angeles, was the fourth and youngest son of famed 20th Century photographer, Edward Henry Weston. Cole received his first camera, a 4 by 5 Autograflex, from his brother Brett in 1935. Cole graduated with a degree in theater arts from the Cornish School in Seattle in 1937 and then served in the Navy during World War II as a welder and photographer. After his discharge from the Navy in 1945 Cole worked for Life Magazine. In 1946 he moved to Carmel to assist his father Edward. During this time Eastman Kodak started sending their new color film, Kodachrome, for Edward to try out. Cole took this opportunity to experiment with this new medium and eventually became one of the world’s great masters of fine art color photography. In 1957 Cole began shooting his first color photographs of the magnificent Big Sur coast, Monterey Peninsula and central California. At this time he carried on his own portrait business while assisting his ailing father, who passed away in 1958. Edward had authorized Cole to print from Edward’s negatives after his death, so Cole continued printing Edward’s work while pursuing his own fine art photography.

In 1988 after three decades devoted to printing his father’s work, Cole at last set aside his responsibility to Edward’s legacy and refocused on his own photography. Cole had his first solo exhibition in San Francisco in 1971. Since then, his work has been featured in more than sixty exhibitions worldwide and has been collected by museums throughout the United States and Europe. His work has been featured in numerous gallery shows and publications with three monographs and numerous articles having been published on his exquisite photography. Michael Hoffman from Aperture Publications once quoted, “In the history of photography there are but a few masters of color photography, Cole Weston is assuredly one of these masters of the medium whose dramatic powerful images are a source of great joy and pleasure”. Cole passed away from natural causes on April 20th, 2003.

The Lumiere Gallery is featuring Cole as part of a unique look at the Weston family’s contribution to photography. A virtual gallery is available on their website.

For More Information: Lumiere Gallery

On Site: “Above a Black Sea”, Photographs by Richard Sherman, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 1, 2017 at 12:19 am

Acceleration by Richard Sherman

Acceleration, Richard Sherman

Richard Sherman returns to Red Filter Gallery with a mix of water inspired work in a new exhibition:  “Above a Black Sea”. Richard shows a consistent eye to not only the whole image but details within the frame. The viewer is rewarded by the “whole” image, with additional benefits derived from focus on the image segments.

Over the last few years, I have spent a lot of time chasing boats. From tugboats to sailboats, from container ships to fishing trawlers, from Naval vessels to crab boats: they all hold a mystical attraction. As a photographer, I am drawn to the textures and geometries of boats: the sail triangles, the arcs of mooring lines, the parallelograms made by wire and shadows.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Portraits of the US Congress: 1986-1987, Judith Joy Ross, Deborah Bell Photographs, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 26, 2017 at 11:14 am
Senator Robert C. Byrd, Democrat, West Virginia (Minority Leader), 1987, by Judith Joy Ross

Senator Robert C. Byrd, Democrat, West Virginia (Minority Leader), 1987, by Judith Joy Ross

A picture can catch a person at their most vulnerable. This is the last situation that most politicians want to be in. But Judith Joy Ross managed to do just that over a period of several years.

Ingeniously, Ross proposed an exhibition of portraits of members of Congress to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia even before she made the pictures, suggesting that the show could be held in celebration of the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution.  This plan also helped her gain access to the politicians she wished to photograph.  With the financial support from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship she had received in 1985, Ross embarked upon the project and proceeded to set up appointments with 117 members of Congress and their aides.  The resulting exhibition, Portraits of the United States Congress, was held at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1987 and travelled to the Lehigh University Art Galleries in Bethlehem, PA in 1989.  Twenty of the photographs were shown last fall at Tops Gallery in Memphis.  The photographs have not been shown as a group in New York since they were exhibited at James Danziger Gallery in 1991.

“I made Portraits of the United States Congress, 1986-87 to deal with authority figures on my own terms. When I was photographing at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1983-84, the Capitol was visible in the distance.  I wanted to know who these people were who were in our government, the people who were running our lives.  They didn’t look real to me in the media except for on the MacNeil/Lehrer show (now PBS NewsHour), where the masks were off.

I figured out who to photograph with the help of the wonderful Almanac of American Politics published by the National Journal.  It is a 1,591-page compendium of information about the Members of the House and the Senate, with detailed information on exactly how they voted and who they represent.  I picked people I disagreed with and people I agreed with.  This was very inspiring.”   – Judith Joy Ross

Deborah Bell Photographs will be opening the exhibit to the public on February 1st. The exhibit is sure to be one of the more thought-provoking displays this winter, so for those in the NY Metro area, make sure to visit before it concludes on April 29th, 2017.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Preview: Route 66 Motels, John Schott, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 19, 2017 at 10:56 am

Ringing in the new year, Joseph Bellows Gallery has decided to start things with pure Americana, brought to you through the eyes of photographer John Schott.

In the summer of 1973, John Schott drove Route 66 from the Midwest to California and back, sleeping in his pick-up truck and photographing with an 8 x 10 inch Deardorf view camera. Among his subjects were the motels situated along this expanse of highway.

Route 66 Motels will present a key set of vintage prints that formed Schott’s series of topographic views of these small motels that punctuate this highway landscape, both in daylight and under the glow of artificial illumination. In this collection of vernacular forms, Schott describes a particular architectural structure, within a specific era, while subtly reminding his viewers that the road and its adjacent dwellings are part of what defines the landscape.

In 1975 he received an Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the National Endowment for the Arts. That same year he was included in William Jenkins’ seminal exhibition at the George Eastman House, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape. In 2009 a reexamination of this exhibition organized Britt Salvesen toured to numerous museum venues including: the Center for Creative Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume, Paris and Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, Bilbao.

 

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery