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Archive for the ‘Exhibits’ Category

Preview: Steve Schapiro, Heroic Times, Howard Greenberg Gallery

In Exhibits, Gallery on November 29, 2017 at 11:30 am

Steve Schapiro, Nico in Times Square, 1972, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

An exciting new exhibition will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York this winter featuring the work of renowned photographer Steve Schapiro. Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times, will feature prominent works produced over the span of sixty years by the artist, some which will be on showcase to the public for the first time ever.

Heroic Times marks the inaugural exhibition of Steve Schapiro’s work at the Gallery. Schapiro has witnessed key moments of American history and culture, from the Selma to Montgomery civil rights march to Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign to Andy Warhol’s Factory to the filming of Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. An opening reception with the artist will be held on December 14 from 6-8 p.m.

Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times will survey American milestones from the photographer’s nearly six decade career, with a focus on the 1960s and ‘70s. A number of the photographs are unpublished and on public view for the first time. With assignments from Life, Time, Newsweek, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and many other publications, he captured iconic and humanistic images of politicians, celebrities, artists, and newsmakers in action.

“I am always seeking the image that conveys the spirit of the person,” Schapiro noted. “At the same time, as a photojournalist, I want to create an image so that people will understand what news is being made.”

During Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign, Schapiro traveled with and got to know the young U.S. senator from New York, who greatly impressed him. Also during that time, Schapiro documented the civil rights movement, making photographs of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and many others who fought for social justice.

Schapiro’s subjects extended beyond politics into the worlds of film, rock and roll, and art. He documented The Godfather, Taxi Driver, The Way We Were, Midnight Cowboy, andChinatown. Among the luminaries were David Bowie, Samuel Beckett, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Barbra Streisand, and Nico, who sang with the Velvet Underground.

About Steve Schapiro
Steve Schapiro was born in New York City in 1934. His formal education in photography began when he studied with W. Eugene Smith in the early 1960s. In 1961, Schapiro began to work as a freelance photojournalist, his photographs appearing in magazines including Life, Look, Time, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Sports Illustrated, andPeople.

Schapiro’s photographs have been widely reproduced in magazines and books related to American cultural history from the 1960s, civil rights, and motion pictures. Monographs of Schapiro’s work include Schapiro’s Heroes, 2007, which offers intimate profiles of ten iconic figures. Recently, Powerhouse published Bliss, 2015, about the changing hippie generation; Bowie, 2016; and Misericordia, 2016, about a facility for people with disabilities. This year,  Taschen published The Fire Next Time with text by James Baldwin and Schapiro’s civil rights photographs from 1963 to 1968. Powerhouse will publishMuhammad Ali in spring, 2018.

Museums and galleries have exhibited Schapiro’s photographs worldwide. The High Museum of Art’s Road to Freedom, which traveled widely in the United States, includes numerous photographs from the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr. by Schapiro. Recent solo shows have been mounted in Los Angeles, London, Santa Fe, Amsterdam, Paris, and Berlin. He has had large museum retrospective exhibitions in the United States, Spain, Russia, and Germany.

Schapiro’s work is represented in many private and public collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Museum, Washington D.C.; The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; and the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. In September, he received the James Joyce Award from University College in Dublin. In October he won a Lucie award for achievement in photojournalism. He lives and works in Chicago.

Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times will be on view December 14, 2017- January 27, 2018. Mark your calendars, because this is not a show to miss! For more information contact Howard Greenberg Gallery.

 

Preview: Aaron Siskind Photography, Exhibition at Gitterman Gallery

In Exhibits, Gallery on November 21, 2017 at 1:30 pm

Aaron Siskind, Chicago #15, 1965, Image via Gitterman Gallery

Currently on exhibition, at Gitterman Gallery in New York, is the work of photographer Aaron Siskind produced during his long and prolific career. Siskind was known for bold and abstract works and was often likened to the Abstract Expressionists.

The exceptional vintage prints in this exhibition are masterful examples of Aaron Siskind’s interest in exploring the inherent abstraction of the real world. With these works, Siskind simultaneously captured the bold, graphic qualities of his subject and their nuances of texture and tonality. The images appear both as powerful, gestural forms from a distance, and as rich topographies with minute details and subtlety up close. As abstract as they are, his photographs still possess a sincere, humanist quality. His subjects are often fragments of marks or forms created by others, traces of human existence. As such, the images function as meditations on what we leave behind: emotional, even spiritual records of the interconnectedness of all things. Siskind’s work has often been compared to that of the Abstract Expressionists, with whom he identified and even exhibited. The visual similarities between Aaron Siskind’s graphic photographs and the bold, gestural marks of Abstract Expressionist paintings is striking, but there are important differences as well. As photographs of actual things (walls with peeling paint, piles of rocks, etc), Siskind’s works introduce a tension between the real and the abstract that is absent from any painting.

The exhibition runs from November 16, 2017- January 20, 2018. For more information contact Gitterman Gallery

 

 

Preview: Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Eye of the Century, Personal Photographs from the Collection of Peter Fetterman

In Auction, Exhibits on November 21, 2017 at 11:00 am

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Rue Mouffetard, Paris, 1952, Gelatin silver print. Image via Phillips

We are excited to announce that Phillips in New York will soon be auctioning 120 Henri Cartier-Bresson prints from the private collection of Peter Fetterman. Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Eye of the Century is the compilation of iconic works from the master photographer collected over a span of forty years.

Peter Fetterman, Collector and Owner of the Peter Fetterman Gallery in Santa Monica, said, “Henri Cartier-Bresson was my hero, the man who inadvertently changed my life when I purchased a print of his image Srinagar over 40 years ago. This ‘decisive moment’ set me on a new personal and professional path which continues today. The images in this auction are the culmination of a 40 year journey of collecting his work. These objects have given me great pleasure and a unique understanding of the world and I am happy to pass them on to the next generation.” The images in this auction are comprised of landscapes from the artist’s many travels, spanning from New York City to Kyoto, Japan and from India to the French countryside; portraits of some of the most influential figures of the 20th century, including Malcolm X, Marilyn Monroe, and Truman Capote; and street photography that captured the everyday lives of his subjects from around the globe. Among the highlights are photographs taken of the Russian ballet in the 1950s. Cartier-Bresson was in fact the first Western photographer to be granted access here and these stunning images have rarely been seen on the market. From the highly recognizable Rue Mouffetard, Paris, 1954, and Behind the Gare Saint-Lazare, Paris, 1932, to the rare Bolshoi Ballet, Moscow, 1954, and Dublin, Ireland, 1952, the Eye of the Century offers the opportunity for both new and existing collectors to discover the world of Cartier-Bresson.

The works will be on view at Phillips in New York from December 5-12, 2017 in preview of the auction which will take place on December 12, 2017. For more information please contact Phillips

 

Preview: Rose Mandel, A Sense of Abstraction, Deborah Bell Photographs

In Exhibits, Gallery on November 13, 2017 at 11:00 am

Rose Mandel, William Theophilus Brown,The Errand of the Eye, plate 26, ca. 1953, vintage gelatin silver contact print on original mount, Image via Deborah Bell Photographs

Deborah Bell Photographs will soon kick off their exhibition Rose Mandel: A Sense of Abstraction with a reception on Tuesday, November 14 from 6-8pm. The solo exhibition will feature rare and unique works by American photographer Rose Mandel produced during her prolific career.

Deborah Bell Photographs is honored to present the first solo exhibition in a New York gallery of work by the American photographer Rose Mandel (1910-2002). Comprising some 30 rare, and often unique, vintage prints from her archive, the exhibition will feature portraits, close-up abstracted views of nature, and dynamic seascapes made between 1946 and 1972. The exhibition’s title, A Sense of Abstraction, refers to the primary visual and psychological currents of Mandel’s work: symbolism, surrealism and abstract expressionism. Although Mandel’s photographs were published and exhibited in her lifetime, and her work received renewed appreciation in the 1990s, she rarely sold her prints.

Mandel is closely associated with the well-established modernist tradition in Northern California photography as represented by Edward Weston, Ansel Adams and Imogen Cunningham, yet her nature studies and abstract landscapes also belong to the broader American landscape tradition exemplified by Minor White, Walter Chappell, Harry Callahan, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, and others who explored complex symbolic meanings in their images of the natural world.

The exhibition will run November 15, 2017 through January 13, 2018 with a reception on November 14. Gallery hours for the exhibition are Tuesday-Saturday 11-6. For further information contact Deborah Bell Photographs.

On site: "Urban Night", Photographs by Allen Shifrin, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 1, 2017 at 7:05 am

Conservatory by Allen Shifrin

Conservatory, Allen Shifrin

Black and White photography highlights a dramatic scene through the balance of light and shadow. Surround the same scene in the dark veil of night and the drama is further heightened.

This series of photographs reflects my interest in landscape photography, with an emphasis on the urban landscape.  The subject matter is the scene that unfolds at night, where composition is informed as much by shadow as by artifact.

November 1 through November 30

To view the exhibition: Allen Shifrin

Preview: Eternal Light, Kenro Izu, Howard Greenberg Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on October 16, 2017 at 11:00 am
eternal light photograph by kenro izu

Eternal Light 40 # 4, Allahabad, India, 2013

Photographer Kenro Izu has been a busy individual. Unafraid of travelling the world for inspiration, Izu has compiled both a book and photographs from a recent trip to India, both of which Howard Greenberg Gallery are eager to exhibit.

Two holy cities, Varanasi and Allahabad, inspired New York-based Kenro Izu, who has traveled to India frequently since his first visit 20 years ago. With a name that means “city of light,” Varanasi is considered the spiritual capital of India, a destination for pilgrimages and, for Hindus, the final destination for those who wish to be cremated along the Ganges. Allahabad is the holy city where three rivers meet. The confluence point of the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the Saraswati rivers – called Triveni Sangam – is sacred, and bathing there is said to flush away all of one’s sins.

Kenro Izu (b. 1949) was born in Osaka, Japan.
During his studies at Nippon University’s college of art, Izu visited New York in 1970 to study photography, and subsequently decided to stay and work. In 1979, Izu made his first trip to Egypt, which inspired him to begin his series Sacred Places, an exploration that is still in progress. He has traveled to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, England, Scotland, Mexico, France and Easter Island. More recently, he has focused on Buddhist and Hindu monuments in South East Asia: Cambodia, Burma, Indonesia, Vietnam and, most recently Bhutan and India. He has published several books of his work including: Sacred PlacesKenro Izu Still Life, and Passage to Angkor.

The exhibit will open on October 26th and run until the crest of holiday season – December 9th, 2017.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Herb Ritts Photographs, Fahey Klein Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

In Gallery on October 2, 2017 at 11:00 am
Alek Wek Herb Ritts

Alek Wek, L.A., 1998, by Herb Ritts

During his brief stay on this planet, few created photography as bold and memorable as Herb Ritts. The Fahey/Klein Gallery in Los Angeles has an exciting opportunity for fans of Ritts’ work, with rare and never before seen photographers from editorial sessions for Paris Vogue.

When Herb Ritts accepted the assignment to shoot Corps Et Âmes for Paris Vogue, he was well into his career with long-term contracts at both American Vogue and Vanity Fair. High-profile advertising campaigns, commercials, and music videos had become the norm for Ritts, with each session becoming an event unto itself.  Ritts made a deliberate attempt with this shoot to return to the core basics upon which he established his career.
Under contract with Conde Nast, Ritts required permission from the American Vogue editor-in-chief, to shoot for another magazine, even one under the Conde Nast moniker.  With this blessing, Ritts accepted the assignment and set out to create a photo session that would adhere to the more modest budget typical of a European Vogue shoot.
Corps Et Âmes features San Francisco Ballet dancers, Lorena Feijoo, Yuri Possokhov, Pierre-François Vilanoba and Pauli Magierek, photographed only on the roof of his studio in Los Angeles, where Ritts relied on natural light as his key lighting source. In a return to simplicity, Ritts would pare back to an intimate crew of just a couple of assistants. Ritts would work with rotating walls to control and maximize the use of sunlight and how it would fall on the subjects.  Backgrounds draped with solid black fabric allowed Ritts to accent the contours of each dancer, giving Ritts the opportunity to revisit his long-standing admiration for the shape and form of the human body.
For those who are captivated by bold and iconic photography, visit Fahey/Klein Gallery by October 28th.
For More Information: Fahey/Klein Gallery

Preview: The Rhythm of Old New York, Herman Leonard, Robert Mann Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on October 1, 2017 at 5:00 pm
Herman Leonard photograph of saxaphonist

Image by Herman Leonard, via Robert Mann Gallery

It wasn’t that long ago that New York was a place personified by its grit, grime, and grooves. New York’s Jazz scene may not conjure up the same universal electricity that it once had, but its legacy still remains one of the greatest in American music. Herman Leonard captured that legacy with his photos, and Robert Mann has them on display.

New York City in the fall. The scorching summer heat fades, leaves start changing to buttery yellows and burgundy reds, and the sound of a saxophone player in a Central Park archway sounds like a romantic lullaby taking us back to another time, an older New York. In this sense, the photographs of Herman Leonard are a twofold experience as well, giving viewers an intimate encounter with some of rhythm and blues greats, while conjuring the intense sensation of sound and atmosphere. Robert Mann Gallery is pleased to present Herman Leonard: The Rhythm of Old New York, a symphonic collection of the artist’s iconic images of New York jazz that capture, in velvet tones and poetic compositions, the coolest cats in town.

Considered one of the most prominent jazz photographers, Herman Leonard was born the son of Romanian immigrants in Allentown, Pennsylvania. After witnessing an image being developed in his brother’s darkroom at the young age of nine, Leonard became enthralled with the magic of photography. In 1947, he graduated from Ohio University with bachelor of fine arts in photography, after which he spent a year as an apprentice tomaster Canadian portrait photographer, Yousuf Karsh. Later assignments would take him to East Asia, where in the 1950s he served as Marlon Brando’s personal photographer, and Paris, where he worked as a correspondent for Playboy and Time magazines.

Lovers of Jazz and NYC photography will have a real treat on their hands at Robert Mann until October 14th.

For More Information: Robert Mann

On site: "Meet Me In My Dreams", Photography by Mary Anne Mitchell, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 1, 2017 at 8:00 am

Rorschach Girls by Mary Anne Mitchell

Rorchach Girls, Mary Anne Mitchell

Inspired by poetry, the images in this exhibition draw the viewer in to another world experience.

This series is inspired by my poem ‘Meet Me in My Dreams”.  The images are created using wet plate collodion. I scan and enlarge them to enhance the organic qualities of the medium. The work speaks to family, memory, and the ethereal passage of time.

The setting for many of the images is a fairytale landscape. My use of the young people celebrates the  universal feeling of limitless potential that most people experience in their youth.The ghostlike figures are reflections of the later years when beauty and youth begin to fade.  They suggest the feeling that one is beginning to disappear and yet still present and interacting in the scene.

Now through October 31.

To view the exhibition: Mary Anne Mitchell

Preview: Water Memory, Adam Katseff, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Gallery on September 15, 2017 at 11:00 am

River XI, 2014, Adam Katseff

With incredibly beautiful, simple, and eerie landscapes, there are few who capture the essence better than Adam Katseff. Robert Koch Gallery has the photographers skill on full scale in their latest solo exhibition.

Adam Katseff’s large-scale reductive landscapes, while being minimalist in approach, on closer inspection present the viewer with rich and exceptional detail. Drawn to the Western landscape, Katseff began photographing the landscape at night using a large format 8 x 10 camera. His series Dark Landscapes (2012 – present) and Rivers and Falls (2014 – present) feature iconic locations, which also captivated and inspired influential artists such as Ansel Adams, Carleton Watkins, Albert Bierstadt, Timothy O’Sullivan, and William Henry Jackson. This is no coincidence, as Katseff conceptually set off to recapture these specific locations with the aim of reinterpreting the landscape. Of the chiaroscurist nature of the work Katseff remarks, “The subjects of my recent work are at the same time familiar and elusive. The outline of the image is easy to see, and as with memory our imagination must supply the rest. This is the goal of my current series, to present the viewer with a partial landscape and invite them to compose the rest themselves. In this way the images become at once universal and deeply personal; an exploration of the line between physical space and our psychological relationship to it. Each viewer must invest their own experience, their own subconscious into the work to make it whole, and each comes away with an impression based partly in reality, and partly of their own creation.”

 

Now open, photography and landscape fans will have a wonderful reason to visit San Francisco until October 28th.

For More Information: Koch Gallery