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Archive for the ‘Art Museum’ Category

Preview: Scranton Notorious, Curated by Bernie Andreoli from the Collection of Nick Petula, CameraWork Gallery, Scranton, PA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 16, 2016 at 10:04 am

Mug Shot from Collection of Nick Petula

Prison photographs, or mug shots, hold a unique place in portrait photography. While many portraits are taken and published with the permission of the subject – and often highlight a person in a presentable state – there’s no choice for the subject in prison. Is a mug shot representative of someone in their most candid state? If not, it’s a least a prime low point for any individual. CameraWork gallery will be delving into the medium with their latest exhibit: Mug Shots from the collection of Nick Petula, curated by Bernie Andreoli.

Curator’s Statement:

The spark for this show began three years ago when my friend Nick Petula asked me to scan part of his collection of 100-year-old Scranton Police Department mug shots.  They intrigued me.   I couldn’t get the images, descriptions of the criminals and description of crimes out of my head.  The images are wonderful examples of basic informational portraits yet they appear to have been made by a true photographic artist.  The frontal image with an expressionless stare and piercing eyes and the casual profile belie the reason for the images to be made.  A meld of art, history and the foibles of man.

The exhibit will  conclude December 30th.

For More Information: CameraWork Gallery

Preview: North Dakota, Stephen Perloff, Santa Bannon Gallery,

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on November 11, 2016 at 4:23 pm

North Dakota #3, Stephen Perloff

For much of the country, North Dakota is known for little besides good hockey, Carson Wentz, oil and a certain Coen Brothers film. But now, for photography buffs, Photo Review founder Stephen Perloff’s latest series should add to the list of North Dakota familiarity.

Stephen Perloff is the founder and editor of The Photo Review, a critical journal of international scope publishing since 1976, and editor of The Photograph Collector, the leading source of information on the photography art market. He has taught photography and the history of photography at numerous Philadelphia-area colleges and universities and has been the recipient of two grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts for arts criticism. He was the recipient of the Sol Mednick Award for 2000 from the Mid-Atlantic region of the Society for Photographic Education, the first annual Vanguard Award from the Philadelphia Center for the Photographic Image in 2007, and the Colin Ford Award for Curatorship from the Royal Photographic Society in 2012.

 

His photographs have appeared in numerous exhibitions and reside in many museum and private collections, including those of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the George Eastman Museum, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Lehigh University, and Haverford College. His exhibition, “Unseen Color, Part I,” was shown at The Light Room Gallery, Philadelphia, in March and April 2012; and “Unseen Color, Part II: East and West” was on view at The Light Room in May and June 2013. His work was recently included in the exhibitions “An Evolving Legacy: Twenty Years of Collecting at the Michener Art Museum” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (June 2009 – January 2010); “Streets of Philadelphia: Photography 1970–1985” at The Print Center, Philadelphia (fall 2009); “The Silver Garden” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (February– July 2005); “Continuum: Photography in Philadelphia: Past, Present, and Future” at the Free Library of Philadelphia (March–July 2007); “Filling the Frame” at Photo West Gallery, Philadelphia (April 2007), and “Hot Topic,” a show about global warming, at The Germantown Academy (fall 2007). His work was included in the exhibition “Making Magic: Beauty in Word and Image” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (November 3, 2012 – March 31, 2013), and images from “Unseen Color” were shown at the InVision Photography Festival in Bethlehem, PA, from October 2012 to January 2013. In 2013 his work was seen at the State Theater in Easton, PA (February–March) and at the Red Filter Gallery in Lambertville, NJ (March–April). “West Philly Days,” an exhibition of images made between 1967 and 1976, was shown in West Philadelphia at The Gold Standard in September–October 2014.

 The exhibit will come to a close November 30th.

For More Information: Santa Bannon Fine Arts

 

Preview: A Matter of Memory: Photography as Object in the Digital Age, Eastman Museum, Rochester, NY

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 3, 2016 at 2:55 pm

 

It’s common lore known amongst photography buffs, but it’s worth mentioning once more. Kodak was one the master of the film world, standing atop a powerful media medium that never seemed like it would die. Of course, that was before it helped develop the digital camera. Fast forward to the present and Kodak has essentially put itself out of business. Digital cameras are thriving, and we now how two decades worth of their influence.

The Eastman Museum’s latest exhibition explores just this with the works of a sample of today’s great photographers.

With the convenience and ubiquity of computers and smartphones, the majority of photographic images are being recorded digitally rather than on film. As this transformation has broadened access to photographic images—both in making and in viewing—in many contexts it has also obviated the need for photographic prints. Snapshooters, photojournalists, and commercial photographers rarely produce material objects as the final step in their process. As a consequence, photographs in the form of image-bearing sheets of paper are scarce outside of the art world.

Because personal and collective memories are so inextricably intertwined with photographs—the result of the medium’s progressive saturation of everyday life for the past century and a half—this revolutionary change in the production and dissemination of photographic images is altering society’s relationship to memory.

In the midst of this change, many contemporary photographers are making work that addresses, either directly or obliquely, the potential consequences of the medium’s metamorphosis. Some artists dig deep into photographic materials as though searching for the locus of memory, while others incorporate found snapshots into their work as virtual talismans of recollection. Both kinds of work highlight the presence of the photographic object and function as self-conscious meditations on photography’s ongoing reorganization of our mental and physical landscape.

The exhibit, sponsored b Deborah Ronnen and Sherman Levey, will feature works by photographers such as Anotny Cairns, Ellen Care, Phil Chang, Jason Lazarus, Diane Meer, Taryn Simon, and more. The exhibit is now open and will conclude January 29, 2017

For More Information: Eastman Museum

Preview: Anthony Hernandez, Pritzker Center for Photography, San Francisco MoMA, San Francisco, CA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 25, 2016 at 12:59 pm
Public-Fishing-Anthony-Hernandez

Public Fishing Areas #31, Anthony Hernandez

Do you think that Los Angeles is all sunshine and daisies, David Copperfield and Brad Pitt? The city has certainly embraced its glamorous side and projected it to the rest of the world. But for veteran photographer Anthony Hernandez, son of Mexican working-class immigrants, L.A. has been a lifelong environment of poverty. In his new exhibition, the first solo exhibition and the new Pritzker Center of Photography, Hernandez’s work provides a retrospective on the City of Angels’ pockets of desolation.

Anthony Hernandez is the first retrospective to honor the more than 45-year career of this major American photographer. Featuring approximately 160 photographs — many never shown before — the exhibition includes a remarkably varied body of work united by its formal beauty and its subtle consideration of contemporary social issues. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Anthony Hernandez developed his own individual style of street photography, one attuned to the desolate allure and sprawling expanses of his hometown. Over the course of his career, he has deftly moved from black-and-white to color photography, from 35mm to large-format cameras, and from the human figure to the landscape to abstracted detail. Highlights from the exhibition include black-and-white photographs from the early 1970s taken on the streets of downtown L.A., color pictures made on Rodeo Drive in the mid-1980s, and selections from his critically acclaimed series Landscapes for the Homeless, completed in 1991. Although Hernandez has turned his lens on other cities — including Rome, Italy, and various American locales — Los Angeles, and especially the regions inhabited by the working class, the poor, and the homeless, has been his most enduring subject.

The exhibit is now open and will be available to view until January 1st, 2017.

For More Information: SF MoMA

Preview: Ghosts Who Now Dance, Sandy Alpert, Griffin Museum of Photography, Boston, MA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 13, 2016 at 11:56 am

Into the Light, Sandy Alpert, 2000

Our friend, photographer Sandy Alpert, is taking part in her very first major museum exhibition at the Griffin Museum of Photography. The museum will be exhibiting pieces from her series, “Ghosts Who Now Dance.”

Welcome to the Griffin Museum of Photography, a nonprofit 501(c)3 public charity organization dedicated solely to the art of photography. Through our many exhibitions, programs and lectures, we strive to encourage a broader understanding and appreciation of the visual, emotional and social impact of photographic art.

At the Griffin Museum, you will find exhibitions from well-known photographers to those emerging on the scene that explore important themes and thought-provoking ideas. All of our exhibitions and programs are designed to encourage the passionate exploration of the art of photography.

If you’re not local to the Boston area, the Griffin Museum is the perfect accompaniment to a beautiful fall visit to New England.

Alpert’s works will be on view until November 27th.

For More Information: Sandy Alpert

Preview: It’s Only Rock and Roll, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery on August 17, 2015 at 9:42 pm
Michael Zagaris, The Last Note, The Who, WInterland, San Francisco, CA , 1976

Michael Zagaris, The Last Note, The Who, WInterland, San Francisco, CA , 1976

It’s time to bust out the torn up jeans, Chuck Taylors and your favorite band T-Shirt because Scott Nichols Gallery has brought the funk, good vibes and raw energy to their newest exhibit.

Scott Nichols Gallery is pleased to present It’s Only Rock and Roll, a collection of photographs cataloguing some of the most influential figures in rock and roll. Throughout its history rock music has been characterized by a willingness to
challenge its own boundaries. Over time musicians have reinterpreted, redefined,
and expanded the medium.

Featuring photographs of music icons such as Jimi Hendrix, Janice Joplin, The Who, Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, Bob Marley, Patti Smith, Miles Davis, and Kurt Cobain, It’s Only Rock and Roll explores many facets of a genre in flux. This dynamic range of subjects highlights rock music as a medium wildly open to artistic interpretation. Just as every musician offers a unique perspective, the exhibition presents a variety of individual viewpoints. Whether creating iconic album covers, capturing legendary performances or the private moments in between, the photographers featured in It’s Only Rock and Roll 
offer /provide a window into a genre of music that has captivated listeners for generations.

Featuring photographs by Jim Marshall, Ebet Roberts, Michael Zagaris, Baron Wolman, Linda McCartney, Bob Gruen, Brad Temkin, William Coupon, Bob Seidemann, Scott Palmer, Andy Freeberg, Johnny Ace, and others.

The exhibit is open now and will be open to the public until September 19th.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Preview: It’s a Long Way to Tipperary, Gallery 339, Philadelphia, PA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 16, 2015 at 11:31 am
Virage, Edward Dimsdale, Autumn 2000

Virage, Edward Dimsdale, Autumn 2000

Anyone in the Philadelphia area should step away from winter and pay their respects to Gallery 339’s final show in Philadelphia.

It’s a Long Way to Tipperary is the last show for Gallery 339 in Philadelphia.  The gallery has been a remarkable adventure, and we are happy with what we have been able to accomplish over the last ten years.  We had wanted to bring great photography to the city, and take the extraordinary work of Philadelphia photographers to other places.  And through the tremendous effort of staff, artists and other supporters, many wonderful pictures have come to Philadelphia, and remarkable photographs from here have gone out to collectors around the world.  With this last show, we want to sum up the gallery in an appropriate way, which is not simply a look back.  We are pleased therefore to present some of the best-remembered images from past exhibitions alongside compelling new projects.  We have been very fortunate to work with an exceptional group of photographers since we opened, and it is a privilege to exhibit their art one more time. 

With over 30 photographers on display, photophiles are sure to find someone’s work they enjoy. Unfortunately, the show only runs through the end of February, so anyone wanting to visit will need to do so soon.

For More Information: Gallery 339

Preview: The Thomas Walther Photo Collection, Museum of Modern Art, NYC

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 7, 2015 at 2:58 pm
Willi Ruge (German, 1882–1961). Seconds before Landing

Willi Ruge (German, 1882–1961). Seconds before Landing

In case you’ve been out of the loop, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City is currently hosting the Thomas Walther Collection of Photography. Bursting with some of the greatest photographers to walk the planet, this a quintessential example of the power of photography.

The creative possibilities explored through photography were never richer or more varied than in the years between the First and Second World Wars, when photographers approached figuration, abstraction, and architecture with unmatched imaginative fervor. This vital moment is dramatically captured in the more than 300 photographs that constitute the Thomas Walther Collection at The Museum of Modern Art. This remarkable group of objects is presented together for the first time to coincide with the culmination of the Thomas Walther Collection Project—a four-year collaboration between the Museum’s curatorial and conservation staff, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which has transformed our understanding of the medium’s material history from this era. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators.

The Museum acquired more than 300 photographs from Thomas Walther’s private collection in 2001. Featuring iconic works by such towering figures as Berenice Abbott, Karl Blossfeldt, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Claude Cahun, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Florence Henri, André Kertész, Germaine Krull, El Lissitzky, Lucia Moholy, László Moholy-Nagy, Aleksandr Rodchenko, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Maurice Tabard Umbo, and Edward Weston, along with lesser-known treasures by more than 100 other practitioners, this exhibition presents the exhilarating story of this key moment in photography’s history, allowing both experts and those less familiar with the medium to understand these photographs in new ways.

Charter a helicopter if you must, because this is one exhibit any enthusiast of photography should go to see. Fortunately, the exhibit will run until April 19th, so there’s no excuse to miss it.

For More Information: Museum of Modern Art

Preview: “Nuit Blanche”, Wendy Paton at Michener Art Museum

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Books, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 31, 2014 at 12:22 pm

Wendy Michner

 

Our friend Wendy Paton has a MAJOR exhibition at the Michener Museum in Doylestown, Pa. With over 60 works on display this is an opportunity to view the work of a major contemporary artist.

An award winning fine art photographer, Wendy Paton was in the throes of a successful, ground breaking career training and driving Standardbred race horses in New York, when in 1981, her interest in photography emerged.She studied at the International Center of Photography in New York, learned the intricacies of night photography from Michael Kenna, and darkroom printing techniques from her mentor and collaborator, master printer Chuck Kelton.

Consisting of two bodies of work,NUIT BLANCHE comprises a premiere selection of Paton’s Visages de Nuit, complemented by a collection of her latest series,Reclaiming Dignity, in an installation of seventy of the artist’s gelatin silver prints.

VISAGES DE NUIT is a collection of 51 black and white candid night portraits, shot over a six-year period from 2006-2012 in various international cities. Paton created this series of nocturnal images, exploring the mystery of the night and bringing the viewer into her subject’s nighttime world. Their dark, gritty characteristics purposely convey Paton’s interpretation of the surreal quality of life at night, and what is hiding behind what we normally view as reality.

RECLAIMING DIGNITY is a portfolio of Paton’s vision of “abstract portraits,” faces and bodies of neglected cars, once coveted for their style, beauty, speed and grace. Left unattended and ignored for years, then a chance to once again be admired and coveted; an opportunity to “reclaim their dignity.”

Now through December 7.

For more information: Wendy Paton

Preview: Artificial Light: Flash Photography in The Twentieth Century, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photographer on June 3, 2014 at 2:45 pm
The Pendulum, Berenice Abbott

The Pendulum, Berenice Abbott

Photographers the world around have a love/hate relationship with the utility of flash photography. Philadelphia Museum assistant curator Amanda Bock has put together an exhibit of notable photographers who were able to master its use.

Explore diverse examples of flash photography, which gained widespread use in the 1920s with the invention of the mass-produced flashbulb. Hailed by many photographers for its ability to capture action and movement, flash aided in scientific pursuits including Harold Edgerton’s high-speed, stop-action prints and Berenice Abbott’s photographic illustrations of scientific principles. Flash also played an important role in journalistic and documentary work, as reflected in images by Russell Lee, Lucy Ashjian, Lisette Model, and Gordon Parks.

With it now open to the public until August 3, go check it out for inspiration, tips and some epicurean enjoyment.

For More Information: Philadelphia Museum of Art