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Archive for the ‘Gallery’ Category

Preview: Eternal Light, Kenro Izu, Howard Greenberg Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on October 16, 2017 at 11:00 am
eternal light photograph by kenro izu

Eternal Light 40 # 4, Allahabad, India, 2013

Photographer Kenro Izu has been a busy individual. Unafraid of travelling the world for inspiration, Izu has compiled both a book and photographs from a recent trip to India, both of which Howard Greenberg Gallery are eager to exhibit.

Two holy cities, Varanasi and Allahabad, inspired New York-based Kenro Izu, who has traveled to India frequently since his first visit 20 years ago. With a name that means “city of light,” Varanasi is considered the spiritual capital of India, a destination for pilgrimages and, for Hindus, the final destination for those who wish to be cremated along the Ganges. Allahabad is the holy city where three rivers meet. The confluence point of the Ganges, the Yamuna, and the Saraswati rivers – called Triveni Sangam – is sacred, and bathing there is said to flush away all of one’s sins.

Kenro Izu (b. 1949) was born in Osaka, Japan.
During his studies at Nippon University’s college of art, Izu visited New York in 1970 to study photography, and subsequently decided to stay and work. In 1979, Izu made his first trip to Egypt, which inspired him to begin his series Sacred Places, an exploration that is still in progress. He has traveled to Egypt, Syria, Jordan, England, Scotland, Mexico, France and Easter Island. More recently, he has focused on Buddhist and Hindu monuments in South East Asia: Cambodia, Burma, Indonesia, Vietnam and, most recently Bhutan and India. He has published several books of his work including: Sacred PlacesKenro Izu Still Life, and Passage to Angkor.

The exhibit will open on October 26th and run until the crest of holiday season – December 9th, 2017.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Herb Ritts Photographs, Fahey Klein Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

In Gallery on October 2, 2017 at 11:00 am
Alek Wek Herb Ritts

Alek Wek, L.A., 1998, by Herb Ritts

During his brief stay on this planet, few created photography as bold and memorable as Herb Ritts. The Fahey/Klein Gallery in Los Angeles has an exciting opportunity for fans of Ritts’ work, with rare and never before seen photographers from editorial sessions for Paris Vogue.

When Herb Ritts accepted the assignment to shoot Corps Et Âmes for Paris Vogue, he was well into his career with long-term contracts at both American Vogue and Vanity Fair. High-profile advertising campaigns, commercials, and music videos had become the norm for Ritts, with each session becoming an event unto itself.  Ritts made a deliberate attempt with this shoot to return to the core basics upon which he established his career.
Under contract with Conde Nast, Ritts required permission from the American Vogue editor-in-chief, to shoot for another magazine, even one under the Conde Nast moniker.  With this blessing, Ritts accepted the assignment and set out to create a photo session that would adhere to the more modest budget typical of a European Vogue shoot.
Corps Et Âmes features San Francisco Ballet dancers, Lorena Feijoo, Yuri Possokhov, Pierre-François Vilanoba and Pauli Magierek, photographed only on the roof of his studio in Los Angeles, where Ritts relied on natural light as his key lighting source. In a return to simplicity, Ritts would pare back to an intimate crew of just a couple of assistants. Ritts would work with rotating walls to control and maximize the use of sunlight and how it would fall on the subjects.  Backgrounds draped with solid black fabric allowed Ritts to accent the contours of each dancer, giving Ritts the opportunity to revisit his long-standing admiration for the shape and form of the human body.
For those who are captivated by bold and iconic photography, visit Fahey/Klein Gallery by October 28th.
For More Information: Fahey/Klein Gallery

Preview: The Rhythm of Old New York, Herman Leonard, Robert Mann Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on October 1, 2017 at 5:00 pm
Herman Leonard photograph of saxaphonist

Image by Herman Leonard, via Robert Mann Gallery

It wasn’t that long ago that New York was a place personified by its grit, grime, and grooves. New York’s Jazz scene may not conjure up the same universal electricity that it once had, but its legacy still remains one of the greatest in American music. Herman Leonard captured that legacy with his photos, and Robert Mann has them on display.

New York City in the fall. The scorching summer heat fades, leaves start changing to buttery yellows and burgundy reds, and the sound of a saxophone player in a Central Park archway sounds like a romantic lullaby taking us back to another time, an older New York. In this sense, the photographs of Herman Leonard are a twofold experience as well, giving viewers an intimate encounter with some of rhythm and blues greats, while conjuring the intense sensation of sound and atmosphere. Robert Mann Gallery is pleased to present Herman Leonard: The Rhythm of Old New York, a symphonic collection of the artist’s iconic images of New York jazz that capture, in velvet tones and poetic compositions, the coolest cats in town.

Considered one of the most prominent jazz photographers, Herman Leonard was born the son of Romanian immigrants in Allentown, Pennsylvania. After witnessing an image being developed in his brother’s darkroom at the young age of nine, Leonard became enthralled with the magic of photography. In 1947, he graduated from Ohio University with bachelor of fine arts in photography, after which he spent a year as an apprentice tomaster Canadian portrait photographer, Yousuf Karsh. Later assignments would take him to East Asia, where in the 1950s he served as Marlon Brando’s personal photographer, and Paris, where he worked as a correspondent for Playboy and Time magazines.

Lovers of Jazz and NYC photography will have a real treat on their hands at Robert Mann until October 14th.

For More Information: Robert Mann

On site: "Meet Me In My Dreams", Photography by Mary Anne Mitchell, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 1, 2017 at 8:00 am

Rorschach Girls by Mary Anne Mitchell

Rorchach Girls, Mary Anne Mitchell

Inspired by poetry, the images in this exhibition draw the viewer in to another world experience.

This series is inspired by my poem ‘Meet Me in My Dreams”.  The images are created using wet plate collodion. I scan and enlarge them to enhance the organic qualities of the medium. The work speaks to family, memory, and the ethereal passage of time.

The setting for many of the images is a fairytale landscape. My use of the young people celebrates the  universal feeling of limitless potential that most people experience in their youth.The ghostlike figures are reflections of the later years when beauty and youth begin to fade.  They suggest the feeling that one is beginning to disappear and yet still present and interacting in the scene.

Now through October 31.

To view the exhibition: Mary Anne Mitchell

Preview: Water Memory, Adam Katseff, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Gallery on September 15, 2017 at 11:00 am

River XI, 2014, Adam Katseff

With incredibly beautiful, simple, and eerie landscapes, there are few who capture the essence better than Adam Katseff. Robert Koch Gallery has the photographers skill on full scale in their latest solo exhibition.

Adam Katseff’s large-scale reductive landscapes, while being minimalist in approach, on closer inspection present the viewer with rich and exceptional detail. Drawn to the Western landscape, Katseff began photographing the landscape at night using a large format 8 x 10 camera. His series Dark Landscapes (2012 – present) and Rivers and Falls (2014 – present) feature iconic locations, which also captivated and inspired influential artists such as Ansel Adams, Carleton Watkins, Albert Bierstadt, Timothy O’Sullivan, and William Henry Jackson. This is no coincidence, as Katseff conceptually set off to recapture these specific locations with the aim of reinterpreting the landscape. Of the chiaroscurist nature of the work Katseff remarks, “The subjects of my recent work are at the same time familiar and elusive. The outline of the image is easy to see, and as with memory our imagination must supply the rest. This is the goal of my current series, to present the viewer with a partial landscape and invite them to compose the rest themselves. In this way the images become at once universal and deeply personal; an exploration of the line between physical space and our psychological relationship to it. Each viewer must invest their own experience, their own subconscious into the work to make it whole, and each comes away with an impression based partly in reality, and partly of their own creation.”

 

Now open, photography and landscape fans will have a wonderful reason to visit San Francisco until October 28th.

For More Information: Koch Gallery

Preview: The Lines and The Andean Desert Survey, Edward Ranney, Deborah Bell Photographs, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Gallery on September 13, 2017 at 4:41 pm

Nazca Pampa, 1985, by Edward Ranney

Now open at Deborah Bell Photographs, experience the desolate beauty captured by Edward Ranney in Peru.

The Lines and The Andean Desert Survey will feature 17 photographs taken in Peru, where Ranney began photographing over 50 years ago. Included will be selections from his recently published book, “The Lines,” which depict markings in the Peruvian desert made by the ancient Nazcas, a relatively small culture that flourished on Peru’s southern coast from around the beginning of the Christian era until 600 AD. The purpose and meanings of these ancient geoglyphs, made by clearing the surface of the desert floor, or by creating paths of stones, remain mysterious and open to different interpretations by scholars. As Ranney explains in a preface to The Lines (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014):

“Just south of Peru’s Ingenio River Valley there is a low hill alongside the Pan-American highway. Here one can overlook the vast, confounding space of the Nazca Pampa and make out some of the lines, or geoglyphs, etched on it by the Nazca culture some fifteen hundred years ago. The lines on the pampa, particularly the figural geoglyphs, have been documented in detail over the last sixty years by aerial photographs, which have given us a broader understanding of their unique qualities. Yet in spite of the information provided by aerial views, it seems to me there is still much to be gained by seeing and experiencing the lines on ground level, as their creators did. … In addition to their perceptual qualities, the lines can be seen as a form of mapping, marking reference points and connections within the landscape, thereby transforming a harsh natural environment into an understandable, even intimate cultural space. … Important ceremonies undoubtedly took place along and within these lines. … It was also thought that the lines, trapezoids, and swept gathering places were sites of ceremonial processions and pilgrimages, and were renewed and reconfigured over many generations. It is unlikely we will ever know definitively what the geoglyphs meant to their creators. But what is clear is that they mark places – and times – of significance. This minimal landscape continues to reveal to us a fragile record of its human occupation. It is a record of elusive meaning, a unique evocation of the inalterable connection between humans and nature.”

The exhibit is now open and will be available for viewing between 11am-6pm, Tuesday through Saturday. Its conclusion will come November 4th.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Preview: In Search of the Monkey Girl, Randal Levenson, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Gallery on September 5, 2017 at 11:00 am

In Search of the Monkey Girl

From sideshow acts to road trips through Mexico, Randal Levenson led the photography lifestyle many can only dream of. Now Joseph Bellows is getting to share some of his journeys, as part of the very first solo exhibition the gallery has had for the photographer.

In Search of the Monkey Girl will present a selection of vintage black and white prints from the ten years Levenson traveled with various sideshows and carnivals throughout 1970’s. During this period, Levenson captured mesmeric and compassionate portraits of the assorted community of performers and workers. His camera also revealed the surrounding landscape of the midway; views of the exhibit halls, facades with posters announcing the oddities that reside within, and the thrill rides.

The photographs as a whole express the spectacle of a life lived at the margins of society. In 1982, Aperture published a book of this work under the title, In Search of the Monkey Girl, accompanied by a text from Spalding Gray.

Recently, Levenson has dedicated his attention to color materials and the portrayal of the American small town, its landscape, artifacts, and people. A selection of large-scale pigment prints from his Americana series will be featured in conjunction with the vintage work.

In addition to the photographs from the Monkey Girl and Americana, a newly published portfolio of 11 carbon ink prints from the artist’s extended road trip in 1974, from Mexico City to Oaxaca and back will complement the other bodies of work.

Randal Levenson was born in Wichita Falls, Texas in 1946 and developed an interest in photography during time spent in Alaska in the 1960s. He attended Brown University and studied photography at the Rhode Island School of Design.

For those interested, the exhibit will open with an opening reception for the Artist on Saturday, September 9th, from 6-8pm. Visitors to the gallery will have until October 17th, to catch a glimpse.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Water Memory, Adam Katseff, Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Gallery on September 2, 2017 at 11:05 am
River-X-by-Adam-Katseff

River X, 2014, Adam Katseff

Can’t stand California’s heat? Why not head to an exhibition next weekend For the first time in Robert Koch Gallery’s history, it will be hosting a solo exhibition for Adam Katseff.

Adam Katseff’s large-scale reductive landscapes, while being minimalist in approach, on closer inspection present the viewer with rich and exceptional detail. Drawn to the Western landscape, Katseff began photographing the landscape at night using a large format 8 x 10 camera. His series Dark Landscapes (2012 – present) and Rivers and Falls (2014 – present) feature iconic locations, which also captivated and inspired influential artists such as Ansel Adams, Carleton Watkins, Albert Bierstadt, Timothy O’Sullivan, and William Henry Jackson. This is no coincidence, as Katseff conceptually set off to recapture these specific locations with the aim of reinterpreting the landscape. Of the chiaroscurist nature of the work Katseff remarks, “The subjects of my recent work are at the same time familiar and elusive. The outline of the image is easy to see, and as with memory our imagination must supply the rest. This is the goal of my current series, to present the viewer with a partial landscape and invite them to compose the rest themselves. In this way the images become at once universal and deeply personal; an exploration of the line between physical space and our psychological relationship to it. Each viewer must invest their own experience, their own subconscious into the work to make it whole, and each comes away with an impression based partly in reality, and partly of their own creation.”

For those wishing to catch the official reception, it takes place September 7th, from 5:30pm to 7:30pm. The exhibit will be on display until October 28th.

For More Information: Robert Koch Gallery

On Site: “Consequences”, Photographs by Oliver Klink, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 1, 2017 at 8:00 am

013 Ancient Farming by Oliver Klink

Ancient Farming, Oliver Klink

One of our outstanding up and coming fine art photographers is West Coast resident Oliver Klink.

Oliver’s work has been published with National Geographic, Days of Japan, Black & White magazine, Popular Photography magazine, among others. In 2016, he was selected as Critical Mass Top 50 fine art photographer, “Best of the best” emerging fine art photographer by BWgallerist, and received People’s Choice award from Black and White Magazine single image contest. In 2014, his image “Herding Instinct” won the grand prize at the Rayko International Photo contest. Oliver is a master of the new digital printing process called Piezography. Originally from Switzerland, Oliver currently resides in Los Gatos, California with his wife.

“Consequences” addresses the current threats to natural and cultural diversity, sites where modernity, tradition, and wild lands collide. It is an elegy for what is vanishing and a celebration of those cultures resilient enough to maintain their vibrancy. As we drift toward a blandly amorphous, generic world, as cultures disappear and life becomes more uniform, we as a people and a species, and Earth itself, are deeply impoverished. The images take the viewer on a roller coaster ride of aesthetic of disappearance, with hope that the fading traditions are not permanent and irreversible.

Now through September 30.

To view the exhibition: Oliver Klink

Preview: In Tune With the Portraits, Gilson Lavis, Salomon Arts Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on August 21, 2017 at 10:30 am
Keith Moon Gilson portrait

Keith Moon, Gilson Lavis

In a spin on what is normally discussed on Red Filter Gallery, today we highlight a truly rocking exhibition featuring one of the best rockers to get behind the drumset – Gilson Lavis.

Gilson Lavis has remained one of the most sought after, highly-acclaimed drummers in the UK over the last 40 years.

Best known currently as the superbly versatile drummer with Jools Holland’s Rhythm & Blues Orchestra, Gilson Lavis is now shining the spotlight on his second career as an artist. His talent as an artist, doing mainly acrylic on canvas portraits and sketches, has always seemed to stay in the background with his music career taking the lead.

He is now bringing his art across the pond to unveil his work in New York City. His portraits are mostly of musicians and recording artists he has long admired, known and worked with. Those in his “Music Legends” series of paintings span the decades from the 1950’s and 60’s…..BB King, Chuck Berry, Etta James, Eartha Kitt, James Brown, Wilson Picket, Ray Charles, Ronnie Spector, Sammy Davis, Dean Martin….to the more contemporary…..Keith Moon, Al Green, Mick Jagger, Eric Clapton, Bruce Springsteen, Debbie Harry, David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Elvis Costello…..to current day songstresses like Adele and the late Amy Winehouse.

With such personal access to the who’s-who of rock and pop, Lavis’ work is sure to fascinate both portrait fans and music lovers alike. In Tune With the Portraits opens September 15th and will conclude October 5th, 2017.

For More Information: Salomon Arts Gallery