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Archive for the ‘Gallery’ Category

On Site: “Alchemy”, Photographs by Bronwen Hazlett, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on June 1, 2018 at 2:54 pm

Drained by Bronwen Hazlett

Drained, Bronwen Hazlett

Using an alternative printing process, Bronwen Hazlett brings a mystic touch to abstract photographic scenes …

During the process of painting chemistry and exposing imagery, I push emotions and reality into something indiscernible but felt.   I coerce chemical reactions like my own reactions to hopes colliding with reality.

Now through June 30.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Herbert Matter, Giocometti, Calder & Mercedes, Gitterman Gallery, NYC, NY

In Gallery on May 31, 2018 at 11:21 pm

Annette IV, 1962, Herbert Matter

Gitterman Gallery has opened a new stellar exhibit to help satiate photo lovers’ needs for classic black and white photographs.

This exhibition focuses on the work Herbert Matter created photographing Alexander Calder, Mercedes Matter, and Alberto Giacometti. Matter’s work isn’t easily categorized since he worked as a photographer and as a graphic designer for a span of almost 50 years. Furthermore, he used a variety of processes and techniques to achieve his vision. The gallery’s first exhibition of Herbert Matter’s work from the late 1930s through the early 1950s demonstrated his broad vocabulary of abstraction. Though more representational, each of the three bodies of work in this exhibition have their own distinctive characteristics and add depth to his artistic achievement.

Matter met Alexander Calder in 1936 when he photographed his work for the Pierre Mattise Gallery. They quickly developed a respect and an admiration for each other’s work and went on to have a close friendship that lasted many years. Matter even named his son, Alexander, after Calder who was his godfather. Calder sought Matter’s expertise and had him play a crucial role in the vision and design of Calder’s retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art in 1943. He was the cinematographer for the 1944 MoMA film, Alexander Calder: Sculpture and Constructions and was the director and cinematographer for the 1950 MoMA film Works of Calder (narrated by Burgess Meredith with music by John Cage). Matter’s photographs of Calder and his works are both essential documents and works of art themselves that add to our understanding Calder’s art.

The photographs of Mercedes Carles were made in 1940 in Provincetown, Massachusetts, the summer before they married. These works, in their symbolist or even surreal staging, express both Matter’s artistic achievement and the early passion of their relationship. The couple was introduced in 1938 by Fernand Léger when Matter was seeking an assistant and translator to work on the Swiss pavilion he was designing for the 1939 New York World’s Fair. Mercedes Carles was the daughter of the American abstract painter Arthur B. Carles and Mercedes de Cordoba, who was a model for Edward Steichen and briefly a correspondent for Paris Vogue. Mercedes was a great artist in her own right. She studied with Hans Hofmann at the Art Students League and went on to teach and found the New York Studio School. Mercedes met Lee Krasner in a jail cell after they were arrested at a demonstration of WPA models and artists in 1936 and become fast friends. It was through this relationship that Matter met Jackson Pollock and became close friends. The Matters were very active in the New York art scene and maintained friendships with John Cage, Philip Guston, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Barnett Newman, Buckminster Fuller and fellow Swiss photographer Robert Frank.

The exhibit is now open and will conclude July 27th.

For More Information: Gitterman Gallery

Preview: Photograms | Literary, Wendy Paton, Artsource Loft, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on May 14, 2018 at 10:43 am

#46 Photograms  Literary©Wendy Paton

One of the great beauties of photography is the unique perspective photographers can create within this flexible medium. Such is the case with Wendy Paton’s latest exhibition at Artsource International at the Artsource Loft in New York City where Paton’s works, are curated as “Photograms | Literary”. The collection takes special advantage of the visual architectural elements of books, and are presented in an almost ethereal light. These Black and White visual constructs are indeed unique.

The exhibition features an extensive selection of Paton’s series of dynamic, gelatin silver Photograms using the literary and artistic world of books as her subject.
Utilizing the age-old photographic process also known as camera-less photography, the artist has created a visual language that metamorphose a literal and literary object, the book, into an interpretation of artistic abstraction. Paton boldly emphasizes the contrast of the printed word on paper and the fast conquering digital form, rapidly changing both the literary and photographic mediums. “As printed books are fading from our lives, being replaced by the digital medium, so is the gelatin silver photograph being replaced by our mobile phones and digital photographic technology.”

#54 Photograms Literary©Wendy Paton

Paton’s new book “Photograms l Literary, FLIGHT”, a limited edition, signed and numbered artist book (pub. Brilliant – Press, USA) will be introduced at the opening with the artist in attendance.

Wendy Paton is an award winning American photographer best known for her dramatic black & white, candid, nocturnal portraits, first seen in her series and monograph, Visages de Nuit. Paton’s work, including selections of Photograms l Literary, has been exhibited in solo U.S. and international gallery and museum exhibitions. Her photographs are included in the the permanent collections of the Bibliotheque Nationale de France – Spallart Collection, Austria – Musee de la Photographie, Belgium – James A. Michener Art Museum, U.S. – International Center of Photography, NY,U.S. – Lumiere Brothers Center of Photography, Moscow – Personal Collection of Prince Albert II of Monaco, and many notable private collections.

The exhibit will be opening May 17th and concluding on June 30th. 

For More Information: Artsource Loft

Preview: In My Room, Saul Leiter, Howard Greenberg Gallery, NY

In Gallery on May 7, 2018 at 11:00 am
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Saul Leiter, Untitled (nude), 1950s, image from Saul Leiter Foundation via Howard Greenberg Gallery

Few photographers were able to create as intimate and contemplative a portfolio as Saul Leiter. Howard Greenberg Gallery will allow the masses experience Leiter’s touch for the second half of spring.

Fed by thrilling recent discoveries from Saul Leiter’s archive, the exhibition reveals the world of the artist and the women in his life through his studies of the female figure. Often illuminated by the lush natural light of Leiter’s studio in New York City’s East Village, these black-and-white images uncover the mutual and empathetic collaboration between the artist and his subjects.

In the 1970s, Leiter planned to make a book of his nudes, but never realized the project in his lifetime. The exhibition and upcoming book offer a first-time look at this body of work, which Leiter began on his arrival in New York in 1946 and continued throughout the next two decades. Leiter, who was also a painter, incorporates abstract elements into these photographs and often shows the influence of his favorite artists, including Bonnard, Vuillard, and Matisse.

The prolific Leiter, who painted and took pictures fervently up to his death, worked in relative obscurity well into his eighties. Leiter preferred solitude in life, and resisted any type of explanation or analysis of his work. With In My Room, he ushers viewers into his private world while retaining his strong sense of mystery.

Leiter made an enormous and unique contribution to photography with a highly prolific period in New York City in the 1940s and ’50s. His abstracted forms and radically innovative compositions have a painterly quality that stands out among the work of his New York School contemporaries.

The exhibit will open May 10th, and conclude on June 30th.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

On site: “New Works”, Photographs by Diane Levell, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on May 2, 2018 at 10:43 am

Wickecheoke Creek 01 by Diane Levell

WICKECHEOKE CREEK 01, Diane Levell

Diane Levell has been creating wonderful images for decades. Using straight technique or alternative print processes, she has always kept the image itself in the forefront for viewer contemplation.

In my work I have consistently striven for a high level of craftsmanship and aesthetic quality. And I wanted to use the photographic medium to its fullest extent; “straight” black and white, color and the historic techniques of the pictorial school.

Now through May 31.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Notable: Peter Fetterman Gallery New Acquisitions, Brian Duffy

In Gallery on April 16, 2018 at 11:00 am
white-coat-brian-duffy

White Coat, South of France, by Brian Duffy

Peter Fetterman Gallery is excited to announce their latest acquisitions, featuring the work of a man known best to his admires as simply, “Duffy.”

Duffy, known to friends and colleagues by his surname alone, is widely credited for having revolutionized the face of fashion photography, defining the visual language of the swinging sixties in London. Duffy completed his training at Central Saint Martins before undertaking an apprenticeship at Balenciaga. In 1957 he began work at British Vogue only leaving in 1963 to work from his studio. Among the many famous faces who sat for Duffy were Jean Shrimpton, Nina Simone, Brigitte Bardot, John Lennon, Michael Caine and Sammy Davis Jr.

“I don’t give a f**k what anybody thinks about me…. I never wanted to be famous. Why? For what? So the doorman at Harrods can recognise me? What I care about is what my kids think about me, and what my grandchildren think of me–the fact that they think I’m a genius is delicious.”
– Brian Duffy
For those interested in the latest acquisitions by the Peter Fetterman Gallery, contact them today for more information.

Preview: Treasures of Our Nation, Joseph Bowser, CameraWork Gallery, Scranton, PA

In Gallery on April 9, 2018 at 10:29 am

Now officially open, join Camerawork in celebrating the natural beauty that can be found in the United States, as captured through the lens of the talented Joseph Bowser.

America’s national parks are a treasure beyond compare. Joseph Bowser will present a small sampling of the magnificent beauty of America’s parks. From the coastal beauty of Acadia in to the hot springs in Yellowstone, the grandeur of Yosemite Valley, and the majestic Sequoias and Redwoods, our parks are truly awe-inspiring.  As Wallace Stegner said in 1983, “National parks are the best idea we ever had. Absolutely American, absolutely democratic, they reflect us at our best rather than our worst.”

Joseph Bowser was born and raised in scenic northeastern Pennsylvania surrounded with rolling hills steeped in history which sparked his imagination, his inspiration for capturing life’s moments, the beautiful landscapes, wildlife and architecture of an area with so much to offer a photographer. From the home front to his travels in the U.S. and Europe, he pursues a passion for capturing what he sees with his camera. Sharing his photos with others and watching their enthusiasm is his joy. Joe’s photos have been featured at the Waverly Small Works Gallery, Everhart Museum in Scranton, Scranton First Friday events, Hazleton First Friday at the Merkel & the Spring Thaw Ice & Wine Festival at Sculpted Ice Works. His photos placed first in both the Beauty of Nature and Enjoying Nature categories in a Great Outdoors photo contest held by Lackawanna County Conservation District. He hopes you enjoy his photos. What better joy can one have than to view an image … and imagine?

The show opened on April 6th, with a reception from 6-8pm, and can be viewed until April 28th, 2018. 

For More Information: Camerawork Gallery

On Site: “Jersey Shore In The Snow” Photographs by Kathleen Nademus, Red Filter Galllery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on April 2, 2018 at 10:18 am

Looking Down by Kathleen Nademus

Looking Down, Kathleen Nademus

We all know the beauty of a snow covered landscape but capturing it on film is a wonderful challenge that Kathleen Nademus takes up with great enthusiasm.

This white magical scene creates a peacefulness, a quietness as no other season does. It is extremely beautiful. Shadows dance on the white blanket left behind. The landscape softens in a snowstorm becoming ethereal. This gift is only with us for a short time. So my hope is for people to stop and look at my images with a bit of wonder and amazement.

Now through April 30th

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Notable: Reverence, Jeffrey Conley, Book Release at Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

In Books, Gallery on March 22, 2018 at 11:04 am

Waterfall, Southern Alps, NZ, by Jeffrey Conley

For fans of Jeffrey Conley, the next event at Peter Fetterman Gallery at the end of this month is sure to be a can’t miss.

Peter Fetterman Gallery is pleased to celebrate the launch of Jeffrey Conley’s new book, “Reverence” on Saturday, March 31, 2018, from 3 to 6 PM. This event presents a unique opportunity to meet the distinguished American fine art landscape photographer in person while he discusses his recent body of work.

Signed books, published by Nazraeli Press in association with Peter Fetterman Gallery, can be purchased at the event for $75.00 USD; they are also available on our website. The corresponding photography exhibition for “Reverence” has been extended in the gallery till June 9, 2018, so we invite you to visit this beautiful body of work if you haven’t done so already.

Again, for those who are interested in the event, it will be Saturday afternoon from 3-6pm, March 31st.

For More Information: Peter Fetterman Gallery

Preview: Robert Bechtle, Gladstone 64, NYC

In Gallery on March 19, 2018 at 10:33 am

Image via Gladstone 64

For many photographers, the drawings of artists part of the photorealism movement can be equally as captivating as images captured through the lens of a camera. Gladstone 64 is now exhibiting one of the movements pioneers, Robert Bechtle, to start the spring.

 An early pioneer of the Photorealist movement, Bechtle has worked for nearly 60 years visualizing a characteristically American setting through depictions of friends, family and streetscapes in his native San Francisco Bay Area. This exhibition focuses on Bechtle’s charcoal drawings that illustrate the residential streets of Alameda, and pays special attention to those which complement light and shadow, architecture and automobile with distinct photographic precision. In this latest body of works, Bechtle demonstrates his deeply attuned and uncanny personal approach to documenting contemporary American culture with extraordinary accuracy.

Created in 2016 and 2017, Bechtle’s new series of drawings captures an indiscernibly timeless view of northern Californian suburban life. Composed with sharp attention to detail, modest visual clues shed light on the contrasting soft and delicate quality of these charcoal drawings while new vantage points offer equally distinct shifts to the far right or left of these frameworks. Alameda, the recurring city in these works and in Bechtle’s oeuvre altogether, is alluded to through his inclusion of small bungalow homes and globe-topped streetlamps, which originated in this particular municipality in the early 20th-century. Bechtle spent many of his early years in Alameda, and he captures this community and landscape through incisive, square-format drawings that glimpse more deeply into the banal and the all too often overlooked. By illustrating multiple perspectives of this city through monochromatic drawings, Bechtle quietly shapes the pauses and shadows that find or leave us and displays how photography, memory and personal history influence these meticulous compositions.

Often inspired by his own photographs, Bechtle’s intimate drawings demonstrate his astute and cinematographic vision, through each work’s methodically framed compositions and through his unequivocal attention to capturing divergent forms of natural light. Bechtle’s drawings appear like stills from a noir film, quietly examining forlorn, desolate sidewalks and vacant cars that line unidentified streets. This psychological dramaticism is reiterated through sharp and exacting image crops, which force the viewer into a condensed and eerie narrative showing no evidence of who or what might occupy the space outside these scenes he presents. Bechtle is also able to masterfully recreate morning, afternoon and evening light, heightening the palpable realism he captures in these constructed narratives, providing a glimpse into his ever explorative eye.

The exhibition will be available until April 21st, 2018.

For More Information: Gladstone 64