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Archive for the ‘Gallerist’ Category

On Site: “Above a Black Sea”, Photographs by Richard Sherman, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 1, 2017 at 12:19 am

Acceleration by Richard Sherman

Acceleration, Richard Sherman

Richard Sherman returns to Red Filter Gallery with a mix of water inspired work in a new exhibition:  “Above a Black Sea”. Richard shows a consistent eye to not only the whole image but details within the frame. The viewer is rewarded by the “whole” image, with additional benefits derived from focus on the image segments.

Over the last few years, I have spent a lot of time chasing boats. From tugboats to sailboats, from container ships to fishing trawlers, from Naval vessels to crab boats: they all hold a mystical attraction. As a photographer, I am drawn to the textures and geometries of boats: the sail triangles, the arcs of mooring lines, the parallelograms made by wire and shadows.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Muybridge, Eadweard Muybridge, Wessel + O’Connor Fine Art, Lambertville, NJ

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 8, 2016 at 8:58 pm

Revisionist history often shows those who were previously considered crazy as geniuses after their ideas bore fruit. Eadweard Muybridge, inscrutably eccentric, fell into this category with his photo arrays that presaged the era of motion pictures. Wessel + O’Connor Fine Arts feature the talented Englishman in their latest gallery.

Muybridge (1830-1904) came to America at the age of 21 and worked with Carlton Watkins in San Francisco, taking some of the earliest pictures of Yosemite National Park. He gained widespread notoriety when he was tried and then acquitted of the murder of his wife’s lover.

In order to settle a $25,000. wager, Muybridge was hired by wealthy California racehorse owner (and former Governor) Leland Stanford to produce photographic evidence that, while a horse was running, all four of it’s legs left the ground at some point. He proved this by devising a series of 12 cameras with trip wires that were triggered when the horse ran past. This would take many years to accomplish but would inspire him to then create the extraordinary body of work for which he is best known today.

Wanting to further explore the innovations he had realized, Muybridge spent three years in Philadelphia; using as many as 48 separate cameras to record men, women, children and animals performing simple tasks like walking, running, and jumping. The gallery will present a selection from each of these categories.

Published in 1887 as “Animal Locomotion, An electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of Animal movements, 1872 – 1885,” this body of 781 unique studies was collected by the likes of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the artist Augustus Saint Gaudens, President Ulysses S. Grant as well as the Emperor of China.

Muybridge will  conclude Jan. 29th, 2017.

For More Information: Wessel + O’Connor

Preview: North Dakota, Stephen Perloff, Santa Bannon Gallery,

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on November 11, 2016 at 4:23 pm

North Dakota #3, Stephen Perloff

For much of the country, North Dakota is known for little besides good hockey, Carson Wentz, oil and a certain Coen Brothers film. But now, for photography buffs, Photo Review founder Stephen Perloff’s latest series should add to the list of North Dakota familiarity.

Stephen Perloff is the founder and editor of The Photo Review, a critical journal of international scope publishing since 1976, and editor of The Photograph Collector, the leading source of information on the photography art market. He has taught photography and the history of photography at numerous Philadelphia-area colleges and universities and has been the recipient of two grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts for arts criticism. He was the recipient of the Sol Mednick Award for 2000 from the Mid-Atlantic region of the Society for Photographic Education, the first annual Vanguard Award from the Philadelphia Center for the Photographic Image in 2007, and the Colin Ford Award for Curatorship from the Royal Photographic Society in 2012.

 

His photographs have appeared in numerous exhibitions and reside in many museum and private collections, including those of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the George Eastman Museum, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Lehigh University, and Haverford College. His exhibition, “Unseen Color, Part I,” was shown at The Light Room Gallery, Philadelphia, in March and April 2012; and “Unseen Color, Part II: East and West” was on view at The Light Room in May and June 2013. His work was recently included in the exhibitions “An Evolving Legacy: Twenty Years of Collecting at the Michener Art Museum” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (June 2009 – January 2010); “Streets of Philadelphia: Photography 1970–1985” at The Print Center, Philadelphia (fall 2009); “The Silver Garden” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (February– July 2005); “Continuum: Photography in Philadelphia: Past, Present, and Future” at the Free Library of Philadelphia (March–July 2007); “Filling the Frame” at Photo West Gallery, Philadelphia (April 2007), and “Hot Topic,” a show about global warming, at The Germantown Academy (fall 2007). His work was included in the exhibition “Making Magic: Beauty in Word and Image” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (November 3, 2012 – March 31, 2013), and images from “Unseen Color” were shown at the InVision Photography Festival in Bethlehem, PA, from October 2012 to January 2013. In 2013 his work was seen at the State Theater in Easton, PA (February–March) and at the Red Filter Gallery in Lambertville, NJ (March–April). “West Philly Days,” an exhibition of images made between 1967 and 1976, was shown in West Philadelphia at The Gold Standard in September–October 2014.

 The exhibit will come to a close November 30th.

For More Information: Santa Bannon Fine Arts

 

Preview: Wynn Bullock & Morley Baer: Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 7, 2016 at 2:55 pm

Wynn Bullock, Solarization, c. 1940

Solarization, Wynn Bullock, 1940

Scott Nichols latest gallery, starring the works of Wynn Bullock and Morley Baer, was supposed to finish at the end of October. But the gallery is pleased to inform the public that it will be extending the exhibit through November 12th.

The Scott Nichols Gallery is a fine art photography gallery located in downtown San Francisco. The gallery shows a combination of established, up and coming and contemporary photographers.

Scott Nichols, a Southern California native, has been a private dealer since 1980. He is considered one of the experts on Group f/64 and Brett Weston. The gallery opened in 1992 and houses one of the largest private collections of Brett Weston photographs as well as an extensive inventory of photographs by classic California photographers such as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard, Wynn Bullock, and William Garnett.

Though the gallery is located in the upscale gallery district of the Union Square area, Scott Nichols has a very casual and friendly style. This is not the typical white walled gallery affair.

After the current exhibit comes to a close, Nichols will be wasting no time with bringing another up for availability. Conversations with the Dead & the Bikeriders, works by Danny Lyon, will open November 15th. Stay tuned for more information regarding the future exhibit.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Preview: Anthony Hernandez, Pritzker Center for Photography, San Francisco MoMA, San Francisco, CA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 25, 2016 at 12:59 pm
Public-Fishing-Anthony-Hernandez

Public Fishing Areas #31, Anthony Hernandez

Do you think that Los Angeles is all sunshine and daisies, David Copperfield and Brad Pitt? The city has certainly embraced its glamorous side and projected it to the rest of the world. But for veteran photographer Anthony Hernandez, son of Mexican working-class immigrants, L.A. has been a lifelong environment of poverty. In his new exhibition, the first solo exhibition and the new Pritzker Center of Photography, Hernandez’s work provides a retrospective on the City of Angels’ pockets of desolation.

Anthony Hernandez is the first retrospective to honor the more than 45-year career of this major American photographer. Featuring approximately 160 photographs — many never shown before — the exhibition includes a remarkably varied body of work united by its formal beauty and its subtle consideration of contemporary social issues. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Anthony Hernandez developed his own individual style of street photography, one attuned to the desolate allure and sprawling expanses of his hometown. Over the course of his career, he has deftly moved from black-and-white to color photography, from 35mm to large-format cameras, and from the human figure to the landscape to abstracted detail. Highlights from the exhibition include black-and-white photographs from the early 1970s taken on the streets of downtown L.A., color pictures made on Rodeo Drive in the mid-1980s, and selections from his critically acclaimed series Landscapes for the Homeless, completed in 1991. Although Hernandez has turned his lens on other cities — including Rome, Italy, and various American locales — Los Angeles, and especially the regions inhabited by the working class, the poor, and the homeless, has been his most enduring subject.

The exhibit is now open and will be available to view until January 1st, 2017.

For More Information: SF MoMA

Preview: Much Lies Beneath: Forsyth, Scialo, Thun, Clay on Main, Oley, PA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 28, 2016 at 4:23 pm

liesbeneath postcard front

Clay on Main, based in the historic village of Oley, Pennsylvania, has established itself as a great local arts center for young and old alike. On September 18th, it opened its latest exhibition, featuring local photographers Amy Forsyth, Patricia Scialo, and Barbara Thun.

The exhibit was curated by Kristen Woodward, with a goal towards showcasing the unseen influences of each these contrasting artists. 

About Amy Forsyth: 

My work is currently in the medium of sculptural furniture, and also in music.  I spend most of my time doing three things: designing and building furniture and sculptural pieces, teaching design at Lehigh University, and playing music, most often with friends.  I do not restrict myself to one particular medium; I make drawings and objects of wood, I studied architecture, have worked in clay, studied dance, etc.  This is both my strength and my weakness.  I am not as good of a craftsperson as someone who spends all their time in one discipline, but because I am not restricted by medium, this gives me new ways of discovering and conjoining ideas.

About Patricia Scialo:

My continued concentration with alternative photographic processes has taken on a mixed-media approach.  When altering the surface of a photographic print I use materials such as oil, graphite, encaustic and found-materials for embedding.

These techniques allow me to build layers, adding depth to the photographic imagery. Hand work is vital to the print-making process.

Rediscovered through the lens of my camera, the subject is often transformed, recreated, with the intention to give the viewer a desire to pause and look closer.

Light is the element of design that catches my eye when looking at subjects.  Light allows me to enhance the subject and create a point of interest. Light allows the magic to happen when processing with photographic chemistry.

About Barbara Thun:

Color and texture, the written word and combinations of images and mediums are the basis of my work.

We exist in a precarious balance with all of nature. My work seeks to remind us of the overwhelming power and beauty of this world – and our insignificance. The power to destroy lies always just behind or below the surface of its beauty.

My present work includes a tactile involvement with three dimensional natural forms and drawings that reflect a more abstract approach to the color and texture of the land – both mediums reflecting the mystery and power of the natural world.

The exhibit will be open for viewing until October 23rd.

For More Information: Clay on Main

 

Preview: Urban Landscapes, George Tice, Joseph Bellow Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on September 8, 2016 at 10:39 am

Lexington Avenue, Passaic, NJ, George Tice, 1973

George Tice has long had a love affair with his home state of New Jersey and the Americana of its urban sprawl. Joseph Bellows takes the public back to the 70s to explore one of Tice’s earlier periods.

The exhibition will present a remarkable selection of forty exceptionally rare vintage 8 x 10 inch gelatin silver contact prints from the early period (1973-74), of Tice’s ongoing epic visual poem of his native state of New Jersey. These unique vintage prints will be punctuated with larger photographs of some of artist’s most revered and significant images, as well as selections of more recent work from his extended New Jersey portrait.

Renowned for their attentive and quotidian descriptions of the everyday structures and places that define the American cultural landscape, Tice’s exquisitely printed photographs catalog a rich and layered journey that is both personal and universal. In the photographs that comprise Urban Landscapes, Tice defines a sense of America within a tradition rooted in the work of other American masters, namely Edward Hopper and Walker Evans. Tice’s photographs of New Jersey in the early to mid 1970’s describe a particular time and place; however, as the artist states, “It takes the passage of time before an image of a commonplace subject can be assessed. The great difficulty of what I attempt is seeing beyond the moment; the
everydayness of life gets in the way of the eternal”. Now, with decades past, Tice’s observations have become even more poignant depictions, everlasting a specific era and landscape, as the artist intended.

The exhibit will open September 10th, featuring George Tice at the opening reception from 6-8pm. Visitors can continue to view until October 28th, 2016.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Notable: 19th Annual Summer Sale, Alan Klotz Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 24, 2016 at 12:46 pm

Oak Tree; Sunset City, Sierra Foothills, CA, 1932, Ansel Adams

Photography collectors on the east coast might behoove themselves to inquire with Alan Klotz Gallery this summer regarding their Annual Summer Sale.

As always the work offered in this sale is from our regular inventory, and is not secondary material.  This year we are featuring prime examples of works by Adams, Brassaï, Callahan, Capa, Chiarenza, Chochola, Curtis, 
de Salignac, Emerson, Evans, Fieret, Genthe, Hill & Adamson, Hine, Kertész, Kumler, Lapow, Porter, Siskind, Strand, Sudek, Clarence White, and many others.
Although the sultry weather might discourage anything but languorous movement, this inventory should engender a more jack-rabbit response. It won’t be available for long. Regardless, of your favorite mode of procrastination, the Sale ends Labor Day.
The Summer Sale will conclude on September 5th. Alan Klotz Gallery is a by-appointment private gallery, so those interested in viewing the any works in person need to schedule a visit. Meenwhile, the Gallery prides itself on swift arrangments for shipping to out-of-towners.
For More Information: Alan Klotz Gallery

On Site: "Singular Space", Photographs by David Christian Rehor, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 1, 2016 at 1:20 pm

AMY TRANSPARENT RADIATION 15, David Rehor

Combining light sources and creativity, David Christian Rehor has brought his imagination to a singular space in time.

From 2001-2016, my friends and family were photographed during the evening hours at various abandoned buildings and empty spaces around Maryland.As daylight faded, I had the ability to add my own light slowly and freely. Using time lapse exposure, I painted my subjects with modified flashlights.

Now through August 31.

To view the presentation: David Rehor

Please note: Red Filter Gallery has redesigned their gallery website and it is now optimized for mobile access on phones, tablets and computers.

Preview: The Fashion Years 1987-2014, Kurt Markis, Verve Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on July 25, 2016 at 11:49 pm

Christy Turlington, Mirabella Magazine, San Francisco, CA, by Kurt Markus

Verve Gallery is displaying a sartorial sort of exhibition with old west flair, starring the work of cowboy portraitist Kurt Markus.

When the fashion editors discovered the West, they went looking for a genuine Western cowboy photographer, someone who knew the heart and practice of small-town cowboy life, “cowboy culture,” on vast cattle ranches–someone who was a true cowboy chronicler and well connected. Kurt Markus was their man. For 35 years he had photographed the buckaroos of Oregon, Nevada, Idaho and California; the cowpunchers of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona; and the cowboys of Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, the Dakotas, Nebraska and Canada. Irrespective of the different captions these wranglers wore there was one common thread, according to Kurt: “They [these chaps] ride in the company of like-minded souls.”

While Kurt has enjoyed many lives as a photographer, his cowboy years were among his earliest. What makes his work so unique is that he photographed cowhands not as an outsider, not as a dude, but as one of them. Kurt hobbled, bridled and saddled his own horse, and rode the prairie lands with them. He camped and bunked on the range. He gathered, culled, roped, medicated, castrated, branded and earmarked calves, heifers, steers and bulls. He had his meals at the cookhouse or chuck wagon alongside them–biscuits and gravy for breakfast; spam, biscuits with corn inside, pickles and “a cake from headquarters” for lunch; and cast-iron-skillet hash, chili and beans for supper. He slept outdoors with “nothing but me and the stars.” He stared into open campfires; he learned to drink, smoke, laugh and bullshit. Together they weathered sleet and snow, rain and lightning, and sweltering heat. He became one of them and they bonded.

Kurt is one of the most distinguished portrait and fashion photographers in the last quarter century. The New York Timesdescribes his work as “arresting black-and-white photos from a master fashion photographer.” His work has appeared, for the most part, in every major fashion magazine and more.

His portraiture is the very essence of excellence in refined craftsmanship; his images are known for their grace and wit and absolute mastery of the quality and character of light. The portraits are spartan, image qua image. They are without distracting elements and distinguish themselves with sober, unadorned clarity. There is no mistaking the object photographed. The composition is straightforward. The shapes are robust, sturdy, lusty and spirited. Each promotes economy in concentration from the viewer. The negative space is truly void, whereas the light is delicate and accenting, revealing and complimenting his subjects. The deep and soft shadows are ideally placed.

The exhibit will be on display until August 27th. Also being featured is the work of young and ambitious Susannah Benjamin.

Susannah Benjamin was born in New York City in 1993. She has a passion for storytelling and mythology. Her photography is intimately tied to the literary medium. Each of Susannah’s images requires meticulous storyboarding, location scouting, casting, and styling. Her aims are to create pieces that are aesthetically engaging and also narratively and conceptually evocative. The artist views her models as characters from larger stories, each with their own history and fictional identity. These characters occupy worlds in which social and physical isolation, metamorphosis, and magic are common, if not expected, occurrences. Benjamin’s use of winged women, bewitched girls, and shape shifting youths allow her to marry the escapist realms of fantasy and myth to topical issues such as bullying, depression, and negative self-image.

Benjamin has been recognized for her photography from a very early age. After winning first place in Digital Camera Magazine’s international “Young Photographer of the Year” competition at age 14, she went on to win the grand prize in the 2013 Irish Times’ photography competition, selected from over 8,000 entries worldwide. She was also one of six artists to win PDN’s “The Curator” competition, which aims to highlight the best emerging fine art photographers.

Susannah firmly believes that artists should approach their work from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Thus, Benjamin pursued a liberal arts education; she is a recent graduate of Yale University with a degree in English and French Literature.

For More Information: Verve Gallery