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Posts Tagged ‘Black and White Photography’

Preview: Route 66 Motels, John Schott, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 19, 2017 at 10:56 am

Ringing in the new year, Joseph Bellows Gallery has decided to start things with pure Americana, brought to you through the eyes of photographer John Schott.

In the summer of 1973, John Schott drove Route 66 from the Midwest to California and back, sleeping in his pick-up truck and photographing with an 8 x 10 inch Deardorf view camera. Among his subjects were the motels situated along this expanse of highway.

Route 66 Motels will present a key set of vintage prints that formed Schott’s series of topographic views of these small motels that punctuate this highway landscape, both in daylight and under the glow of artificial illumination. In this collection of vernacular forms, Schott describes a particular architectural structure, within a specific era, while subtly reminding his viewers that the road and its adjacent dwellings are part of what defines the landscape.

In 1975 he received an Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the National Endowment for the Arts. That same year he was included in William Jenkins’ seminal exhibition at the George Eastman House, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape. In 2009 a reexamination of this exhibition organized Britt Salvesen toured to numerous museum venues including: the Center for Creative Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume, Paris and Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, Bilbao.

 

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Classic Photographs by Ansel Adams & Celebrating William Garnett at 100, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 15, 2017 at 1:31 pm
Displaying

Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958, Ansel Adams

For years, Scott Nichols Gallery has been one of the foremost purveyors of Black and White photography in San Francisco. Drawing on their particular love of the American landscape, the SNG’s Little Gallery is featuring the works of Ansel Adams and William Garnett, the latter of whom is being posthumously celebrated for his 100th birthday; Garnett passed away in 2006.

The pair is an appropriate juxtaposition due to their focus in photography and general love of the environment. Adams has long been celebrated as a pioneer in photographing the American West. Born in 1902 , Adams was one of the founders of Group f/64 with Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston.

As a long time collector of Group f/64, Scott Nichols Gallery will be pulling together a wide assortment of Adams photographs that are part of its collection.

Garnett, born in 1916 in Chicago, Illinois, made his name initially as an independent graphic designer and commercial photographer. What he’s best known for however is it work on the American landscape, like Adams. But unlike Adams, who focused especially on forestry, Garnett’s work was aerial. Over the years, his works were published in magazines such as Fortune, Life and Reader’s Digest.

The Exhibition will be open to visitors until February 25th, 2017.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Notable: George Eastman Museum Fundraiser

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 5, 2017 at 5:50 pm

Displaying

“The rich man never really gives anything, he only distributes part of the surplus.
It is the person of moderate means who really gives.” 
-George Eastman
It’s the time of celebrating with loved ones and a time for rebirth. It’s also a time for giving to good causes, which donating to the George Eastman museum is in spades.
Entrepreneur George Eastman (1854–1932), the pioneer of popular photography, completed his Colonial Revival mansion on East Avenue in Rochester in 1905 and resided there until his death. He bequeathed most of his assets to the University of Rochester, expressing a desire that his mansion serve as the residence for the university president. The large house, measuring 35,000 square feet, proved far too large for this purpose, especially without a large service staff.

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the State of New York chartered George Eastman House Inc. as an independent nonprofit educational institution—specifically, a museum of photography and allied pursuits created as a memorial to George Eastman. The next year, the University of Rochester donated Eastman’s mansion and surrounding property to the museum. The institution altered its name several times over the ensuing decades, but its mission has remained steadfast: to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit photographic and cinematic objects and related technology from the inception of each medium to the present.

At the museum’s opening in 1949, it was one of only two American museums with a photography department and one of only two American museums with a film department (the Museum of Modern Art also had both). In 1951, the museum opened the beautiful Dryden Theatre, with seating for more than five hundred people, to exhibit films.

The George Eastman museum is still running strong, but it needs help, just like any non-profit. If you’re a photography lover – if you’re reading this chances are good that you are – consider a donation to the museum today.

For More Information and to Donate: George Eastman Museum

Favorites: ”Best of the Best” Emerging Fine Art Photographers 2016

In Black and White Photography, Contest, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 3, 2017 at 11:04 am

Spring House I

Spring House I, Patricia Scialo

2017 is here (Happy New Year Everyone!) but let us not forget 2016 excellence in photography without recognition.

Each year the team at BWGallerist attempts to highlight deserving talent we have observed in the course of our activities.

This year’s (once again purely subjective)  list of “Best” emerging photographers is the result of attending portfolio reviews in several cities, reviewing submitted work, contest judging and scanning hundreds of fine art examples in multiple media. These are artists at various stages in their career. Most work in Black & White, and some in Color and Monochrome.

In no particular order … the “Best of the Best” for 2016 are:

    1. Allen E. Shifrin

    2. Margaret McCarthy

    3. Garrett O. Hansen

    4. Anne Burlock Lawver

    5. Oliver Klink

    6. Dominique Philippe Bonnet

    7. Patricia Scialo

    8. Michelle Brixius-Kasich

    9. Clayton Joe Young

    10. David Christian Rehor

    Congratulations! and have a creative 2017 making YOUR photography.

    The team at BWGallerist

On Site: “Sangre”, Photographs by Coleman Downing, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 1, 2017 at 2:27 am

Displaying Sangre 01.jpg

Sangre 01, Coleman Downing

Geography as abstraction? Here is where Black and White photography excels in imposing a meditative state on the viewer.

Sangre is an exercise in the abstraction of nature. The series is a collection of large scale black and white images of the Sangre De Cristo mountain range in Colorado taken from an aerial perspective. The tight crops and the lack of sky or horizon lines attempt to dispel a sense of scale, while the absence of color endeavors to further obscure the perception of nature. By presenting these scenes without the usual “nature photography” references of horizon lines and color, the aim of the series is to blur the line between “abstract” and “nature” photography while asking the viewer to question the definition of each.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Notable: Darkroom Edition 2016 by John Sexton Released

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 13, 2016 at 1:04 pm
Trees In Snow, Winter by John Sexton

Trees in Snow, Winter Sn, El Capitan Meadow, Yosemite Valley, CA, 1989, John Sexton

Well, the weather’s turned frightful, but photographs are never not delightful. John Sexton is taking part in the holiday spirit with a special limited release of his Trees in Snow, inspired by his Darkroom Edition fundraiser 30 years ago.

The first limited edition print I released was my image Birch Trunks, New Hampshire. It was offered under the mantle of Darkroom Edition 1986 thirty years ago. The idea behind that limited edition print was to generate funds for the design and construction of our studio darkroom complex in Carmel Valley. Fortunately the edition was a great success, and we are still enjoying the luxury of working in such a fine darkroom, studio, and workshop facility. Much to my surprise I received a number of letters (this was long before emails and eNewsletters!) asking if I would be offering another Darkroom Edition. It had never crossed my mind. Over the years I have offered six previous Darkroom Edition limited edition prints – all of which have sold out. Since 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the Darkroom Edition series, it seemed like a perfect time to rejuvenate the idea.

This image has held a special place in my heart since I made the negative and first printed it a number of years ago. I liked the image so much that I selected it as Plate One in my book Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs. I made this image during a winter trip to my favorite photographic location, Yosemite Valley. The day started out with a heavy overcast that soon lead to a steady snowfall. I made a few negatives as I explored the valley, and the snow kept falling and falling. In early afternoon the clouds suddenly broke and strong, crisp low-angle sunlight raked across El Capitan Meadow. The light moved quickly so I had to respond in kind. Using the 150 mm lens on my 4×5 Linhof Technika camera I made an exposure of 1/2 second at f/45. The high contrast between the intense sunlight on the bright snow and the deep shadows in the background forest necessitated N-1 reduced development, a technique to allow the negative to accommodate such a high contrast situation.

It is an understatement to say that this negative is difficult to print. Dodging takes place during the entire basic exposure with both hands. This is followed by extensive burning in, as well as localized print flashing, a technique to add detail in extremely bright areas. While the printing techniques are challenging, the excitement one gets when turning on the white lights in the darkroom and seeing a print that is “just right” makes it all worthwhile.

These 11 x 14″ silver gelatin prints will be offered in a limited edition of 100 signed and numbered prints along with ten Artist’s Proofs. There will be no reprints. For this special edition, Sexton has reduced the price of the print by 20%. Prints are already shipping, so if you feel the need, act now.

For More Information: John Sexton

Preview: Palm Springs Photo Festival

In Art Fair, Black and White Photography, Photographer on December 12, 2016 at 12:03 pm

Photographers, for the past severals years, know that going to Palm Springs in May isn’t about the weather. It’s about the Palm Springs Photo Festival. Now in it’s 12th year, the festival shows no signs of slowing down.

The Palm Springs Photo Festival is where you can learn from celebrated master photographers, present your work to our remarkable faculty of industry influencers, attend important seminars, symposiums, evening presentations & enjoy our networking events!

The festival offers everything under the sun for photographers, whether its portfolio reviews, seminars, symposiums, networking, and workshops.

Our twelth year Workshop Program will offer 16 intense, hands-on, remarkable classes with world-renowned working photographers and educators. Most are three full days beginning on Monday, May 8th plus a 4th day morning session on May 11th.

In most cases, the maximum number of students in a workshop is 16. You will spend three 1/2 days with your fellow students listening, learning, shooting, doing class critiques and comparing notes. Your instructor will work with you, demonstrate his or her methods, explore his or her own work and your own.

Registration is open for those who are interested. The 12th Palm Springs Photo Festival takes place from May 7th – May 12th, 2017.

For More Information: Palm Springs Photo Festival 

 

Preview: Muybridge, Eadweard Muybridge, Wessel + O’Connor Fine Art, Lambertville, NJ

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 8, 2016 at 8:58 pm

Revisionist history often shows those who were previously considered crazy as geniuses after their ideas bore fruit. Eadweard Muybridge, inscrutably eccentric, fell into this category with his photo arrays that presaged the era of motion pictures. Wessel + O’Connor Fine Arts feature the talented Englishman in their latest gallery.

Muybridge (1830-1904) came to America at the age of 21 and worked with Carlton Watkins in San Francisco, taking some of the earliest pictures of Yosemite National Park. He gained widespread notoriety when he was tried and then acquitted of the murder of his wife’s lover.

In order to settle a $25,000. wager, Muybridge was hired by wealthy California racehorse owner (and former Governor) Leland Stanford to produce photographic evidence that, while a horse was running, all four of it’s legs left the ground at some point. He proved this by devising a series of 12 cameras with trip wires that were triggered when the horse ran past. This would take many years to accomplish but would inspire him to then create the extraordinary body of work for which he is best known today.

Wanting to further explore the innovations he had realized, Muybridge spent three years in Philadelphia; using as many as 48 separate cameras to record men, women, children and animals performing simple tasks like walking, running, and jumping. The gallery will present a selection from each of these categories.

Published in 1887 as “Animal Locomotion, An electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of Animal movements, 1872 – 1885,” this body of 781 unique studies was collected by the likes of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the artist Augustus Saint Gaudens, President Ulysses S. Grant as well as the Emperor of China.

Muybridge will  conclude Jan. 29th, 2017.

For More Information: Wessel + O’Connor

Preview: Hommage à Christian Bouqueret, Gitterman Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 6, 2016 at 3:40 pm

Aurel Bauh, Untitled, c. 1930

While America and France have long had their ups and downs, not a single US citizen can deny that the French have long had style and a profound love of the arts. Christian Bouqueret, who passed in 2013, was a prominent French art historian, curator and collector. His collection of vintage photography is truly a sight to behold, which is exactly what inspired Gitterman Gallery with its latest exhibit. Tom Gitterman considered Bouqueret to be a mentor and friend, which will make this exhibit particularly significant to the gallery.

Bouqueret was instrumental in rediscovering the work of many photographers during the interwar period. This exhibition will include work by many of those artists including: Aurel Bauh, Pierre Boucher, Roger Catherineau, Yvonne Chevalier, Laure Albin Guillot, Pierre Jahan, Francois Kollar, Eli Lotar, Daniel Masclet, Jean Moral, Roger Parry, Andre Steiner, Maurice Tabard and Ubac.  Bouqueret “felt that people were always being shown the same images and there was a whole range of photographers who deserved attention.” He stated that: “I don’t look for obviously attractive images; I believe that beauty unveils itself and that mystery is a part of it.”

Christian Bouqueret became interested in the modernity of Bauhaus photography during his art history studies in Berlin. Bouqueret was co-director of Bouqueret-Lebon Gallery from 1990-1997, which represented both contemporary German and French photography. He published many catalogs during his lifetime, including Assia sublime modèle, Les Femme Photographes, and books on Daniel Masclet, Jean Moral, Roger Parry, André Steiner, Raoul Ubac, and René Zuber. Bouqueret’s seminal 1997 book, Des années folles aux années noires: La nouvelle vision photographique en France 1920-1940, which presented over seventy photographers from the period, won the Prix Nadar photography book award. Bouqueret curated 200 vintage prints from his collection for the 2009 Jeu de Paume exhibition entitled Paris capitale photographique 1920-1940: Collection Christian Bouqueret. In 2011 the Pompidou Centre acquired nearly 7,000 photographs from Bouqueret’s collection, which was considered one of the best privately-owned Modernist photography collections in France. The following year the Pompidou exhibited a selection of the collection and published an accompanying catalog titled Voici Paris: Modernités Photographiques, 1920-1950. As Andy Grunberg writes in the Jeu de Paume catalog: “what we know of the history of photography is a result or sum of what has been preserved, collected, exhibited and published.” Thanks to Christian Bouqueret, that history is richer.

The “Hommage” is now available for viewing and will run until January 21st, 2017.

For More Information: Gitterman Gallery

On site: “Pauses” (Unplugged), Photographs by Dominique Philippe Bonnet, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 1, 2016 at 2:00 pm

Pause 10 by Dominique  Bonnet

Pause 10, Dominique Philippe Bonnet

As far as he’s concerned, D. P. Bonnet is quite sensitive about the passing of time.

“It seems to me that we are in life like runners. During the race, one sees the environment like a trail which is more or less hazy or multi-colored. I use photography to capture our world in motion and show how this world is a succession of scenes generating emotions, but whose shades often seem to escape one’s conscious feeling, as it’s too ephemeral.”

His series of photographic meditations are worthy of your stopping off from a busy day.

Now through December 31.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery