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Posts Tagged ‘Black and White Photography’

Notable: “Grey”, New Book by Michael Benari

In Books, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 2, 2017 at 11:00 am

Michael-Benari-Grey

Fans of our friend Michael Benari are sure to be looking forward to March this year, as Benari will be releasing a new book, titled Grey.Many of the images in this book fall into the genre of “street photography”.

Many of the images in this book fall into the genre of “street photography”. I specifically use the street as a source of inspiration for discovering new ways of creating a visual experience. I think of the work as closely related to certain artistic traditions in painting and feel a close connection to everything abstract that has come before me. At the same time “GREY” is a collection of visual experiments, forcing me to push the limits of perception, and discover new ideas and new forms in the process. Our visual experience today is already saturated with so many accepted notions of beauty that looking to re-shape those assumptions becomes the real challenge for today’s artist. The “street” becomes a kind of outdoor laboratory in which I can still find the chance-encountered visual surprise that helps to re-orient my own perceptions and those in my work. Inasmuch as each image is its own resolution, the entire series of images reflects an on-going process of exploring an unknown terrain waiting to be discovered.

Also on the horizon will be a new show in Boston, MA, at 555 Gallery. Stay tuned for more details and images from the new book and exhibition.

For More Information: Michael Benari

On Site: “Conversations With Myself”, Photographs by Paula Gibson, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 1, 2017 at 1:02 am

alwaysgoesbacktothebeggining

Always Goes Back To the Beginning, Paula Gibson

London based Paula Gibson is somewhat of a mystery in her vision of a very personal world.

This selection of photographs considers reflections on love, what love feels like and the doubts that arise in the arms of second best.

To view the exhibition: Paula Gibson

Preview: Skēnē by Alex Majoli, & Wegee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 21, 2017 at 10:36 am
Alex-majoli-scene-6404

Scene #6404, Cairo, Egypt, Celebrating Mubarak’s resignation in Tahir Square, February 11, 2001, Alex Majoli

Howard Greenberg Gallery is bracing against the February cold with a pair of exciting exhibitions, featured the beloved Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and Alex Majoli.

Alex Majoli:

Alex Majoli (b. Ravenna, Italy, 1971) attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, and while at school traveled to Yugoslavia a number of times to document political conflicts. He graduated in 1991. Three years later, his career began after he photographed the closing of a notorious asylum on the island of Leros in Greece, which resulted in his first monograph entitled Leros. In 1995, Majoli went to South America for several months, photographing a variety of subjects for his ongoing series on Brazil, Tudo Bom. He began the series Hotel Marinum in 1998 documenting life in harbor cities around the world. Also that year, he began making a series of short films and documentaries.

Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theatre. Majoli is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, and the show is his first gallery exhibition in New York City. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Weegee:

As a photographer and photojournalist, Arthur Fellig (Weegee) was in his own words “spellbound by the mystery of murder.” His uncanny ability to make early appearances at scenes of violence and catastrophe earned him the name Weegee (appropriated from the Ouija board). His film noir style and dry wit combined with his sensational images of the naked city, often taken at night with a strong flash, have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th century.

Among the highlights in the exhibition will be a 1936 self portrait of Weegee getting his own mug shot at a police station. A series of portraits of people looking up in the sky from 1945 depicts children, a police officer, a man with a telescope, and a nun all watching a fire. A 1943 image entitled The Critic, depicts a disdainful onlooker checking out two ornately dressed women on their way to the opera. A touching photograph from c. 1944 shows two animal caretakers sleeping next to a pen with two giraffes at Madison Square Garden.

Both exhibitions are now open and will conclude on the most foolish of days, April 1st.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Daily Self-Portraits, Melissa Shook, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 15, 2017 at 11:49 pm

Melissa Shook

The idea of taking a photo of yourself each day is now commonplace. Many people do it anyway without thinking, due to the advent of smartphone cameras. But how long could you keep it up? Two months? Six? A year? How about 45 years? Then you’d be in Melissa Shook’s territory.

In 1972, curious about the problem of identity, Shook began an ambitious project of photographing herself everyday for a year. The sum of this impressive undertaking resulted in a compelling set of intimately scaled black and white photographs that range from the artist performing for the camera, to the camera describing the physicality of her being. These early influential photographs will be complimented with a selection of recent daily photographs from 2014-15 that combine individual text entries with a self-portrait image; both text and image act as a diary, reflecting upon the complexities of the human condition. Along with her daily portraits, the gallery will be exhibiting a collection of her extended portraits of her daughter Krissy in her teen years, and a compilation of her video pieces. The exhibition in its entirety explores notions of change and aging, as well as photography’s ability to form an extended document to reveal these qualities.

A photographer, video artist, and writer, Melissa Shook has taught photography at the Creative Photography Lab, at MIT and at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Shook’s photographs have been exhibited in numerous solo and prestigious group exhibitions, including: Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography (MOMA 2010) and Photography in Boston 1955-1985 (Decordova Museum). Among her awards are a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Fellowship, an Arts in Action Grant and a Polaroid Foundation Grant.

The exhibit will open February 18 with an opening reception with the artist from 6-8pm. It will be on display until March 31st.

For More Information: Joesph Bellows

On Site: “Above a Black Sea”, Photographs by Richard Sherman, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 1, 2017 at 12:19 am

Acceleration by Richard Sherman

Acceleration, Richard Sherman

Richard Sherman returns to Red Filter Gallery with a mix of water inspired work in a new exhibition:  “Above a Black Sea”. Richard shows a consistent eye to not only the whole image but details within the frame. The viewer is rewarded by the “whole” image, with additional benefits derived from focus on the image segments.

Over the last few years, I have spent a lot of time chasing boats. From tugboats to sailboats, from container ships to fishing trawlers, from Naval vessels to crab boats: they all hold a mystical attraction. As a photographer, I am drawn to the textures and geometries of boats: the sail triangles, the arcs of mooring lines, the parallelograms made by wire and shadows.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Route 66 Motels, John Schott, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 19, 2017 at 10:56 am

Ringing in the new year, Joseph Bellows Gallery has decided to start things with pure Americana, brought to you through the eyes of photographer John Schott.

In the summer of 1973, John Schott drove Route 66 from the Midwest to California and back, sleeping in his pick-up truck and photographing with an 8 x 10 inch Deardorf view camera. Among his subjects were the motels situated along this expanse of highway.

Route 66 Motels will present a key set of vintage prints that formed Schott’s series of topographic views of these small motels that punctuate this highway landscape, both in daylight and under the glow of artificial illumination. In this collection of vernacular forms, Schott describes a particular architectural structure, within a specific era, while subtly reminding his viewers that the road and its adjacent dwellings are part of what defines the landscape.

In 1975 he received an Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the National Endowment for the Arts. That same year he was included in William Jenkins’ seminal exhibition at the George Eastman House, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape. In 2009 a reexamination of this exhibition organized Britt Salvesen toured to numerous museum venues including: the Center for Creative Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume, Paris and Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, Bilbao.

 

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Classic Photographs by Ansel Adams & Celebrating William Garnett at 100, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 15, 2017 at 1:31 pm
Displaying

Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958, Ansel Adams

For years, Scott Nichols Gallery has been one of the foremost purveyors of Black and White photography in San Francisco. Drawing on their particular love of the American landscape, the SNG’s Little Gallery is featuring the works of Ansel Adams and William Garnett, the latter of whom is being posthumously celebrated for his 100th birthday; Garnett passed away in 2006.

The pair is an appropriate juxtaposition due to their focus in photography and general love of the environment. Adams has long been celebrated as a pioneer in photographing the American West. Born in 1902 , Adams was one of the founders of Group f/64 with Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston.

As a long time collector of Group f/64, Scott Nichols Gallery will be pulling together a wide assortment of Adams photographs that are part of its collection.

Garnett, born in 1916 in Chicago, Illinois, made his name initially as an independent graphic designer and commercial photographer. What he’s best known for however is it work on the American landscape, like Adams. But unlike Adams, who focused especially on forestry, Garnett’s work was aerial. Over the years, his works were published in magazines such as Fortune, Life and Reader’s Digest.

The Exhibition will be open to visitors until February 25th, 2017.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Notable: George Eastman Museum Fundraiser

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 5, 2017 at 5:50 pm

Displaying

“The rich man never really gives anything, he only distributes part of the surplus.
It is the person of moderate means who really gives.” 
-George Eastman
It’s the time of celebrating with loved ones and a time for rebirth. It’s also a time for giving to good causes, which donating to the George Eastman museum is in spades.
Entrepreneur George Eastman (1854–1932), the pioneer of popular photography, completed his Colonial Revival mansion on East Avenue in Rochester in 1905 and resided there until his death. He bequeathed most of his assets to the University of Rochester, expressing a desire that his mansion serve as the residence for the university president. The large house, measuring 35,000 square feet, proved far too large for this purpose, especially without a large service staff.

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the State of New York chartered George Eastman House Inc. as an independent nonprofit educational institution—specifically, a museum of photography and allied pursuits created as a memorial to George Eastman. The next year, the University of Rochester donated Eastman’s mansion and surrounding property to the museum. The institution altered its name several times over the ensuing decades, but its mission has remained steadfast: to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit photographic and cinematic objects and related technology from the inception of each medium to the present.

At the museum’s opening in 1949, it was one of only two American museums with a photography department and one of only two American museums with a film department (the Museum of Modern Art also had both). In 1951, the museum opened the beautiful Dryden Theatre, with seating for more than five hundred people, to exhibit films.

The George Eastman museum is still running strong, but it needs help, just like any non-profit. If you’re a photography lover – if you’re reading this chances are good that you are – consider a donation to the museum today.

For More Information and to Donate: George Eastman Museum

Favorites: ”Best of the Best” Emerging Fine Art Photographers 2016

In Black and White Photography, Contest, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 3, 2017 at 11:04 am

Spring House I

Spring House I, Patricia Scialo

2017 is here (Happy New Year Everyone!) but let us not forget 2016 excellence in photography without recognition.

Each year the team at BWGallerist attempts to highlight deserving talent we have observed in the course of our activities.

This year’s (once again purely subjective)  list of “Best” emerging photographers is the result of attending portfolio reviews in several cities, reviewing submitted work, contest judging and scanning hundreds of fine art examples in multiple media. These are artists at various stages in their career. Most work in Black & White, and some in Color and Monochrome.

In no particular order … the “Best of the Best” for 2016 are:

    1. Allen E. Shifrin

    2. Margaret McCarthy

    3. Garrett O. Hansen

    4. Anne Burlock Lawver

    5. Oliver Klink

    6. Dominique Philippe Bonnet

    7. Patricia Scialo

    8. Michelle Brixius-Kasich

    9. Clayton Joe Young

    10. David Christian Rehor

    Congratulations! and have a creative 2017 making YOUR photography.

    The team at BWGallerist

On Site: “Sangre”, Photographs by Coleman Downing, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 1, 2017 at 2:27 am

Displaying Sangre 01.jpg

Sangre 01, Coleman Downing

Geography as abstraction? Here is where Black and White photography excels in imposing a meditative state on the viewer.

Sangre is an exercise in the abstraction of nature. The series is a collection of large scale black and white images of the Sangre De Cristo mountain range in Colorado taken from an aerial perspective. The tight crops and the lack of sky or horizon lines attempt to dispel a sense of scale, while the absence of color endeavors to further obscure the perception of nature. By presenting these scenes without the usual “nature photography” references of horizon lines and color, the aim of the series is to blur the line between “abstract” and “nature” photography while asking the viewer to question the definition of each.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery