BWGallerist

Posts Tagged ‘Black and White Photography’

Preview: Muybridge, Eadweard Muybridge, Wessel + O’Connor Fine Art, Lambertville, NJ

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 8, 2016 at 8:58 pm

Revisionist history often shows those who were previously considered crazy as geniuses after their ideas bore fruit. Eadweard Muybridge, inscrutably eccentric, fell into this category with his photo arrays that presaged the era of motion pictures. Wessel + O’Connor Fine Arts feature the talented Englishman in their latest gallery.

Muybridge (1830-1904) came to America at the age of 21 and worked with Carlton Watkins in San Francisco, taking some of the earliest pictures of Yosemite National Park. He gained widespread notoriety when he was tried and then acquitted of the murder of his wife’s lover.

In order to settle a $25,000. wager, Muybridge was hired by wealthy California racehorse owner (and former Governor) Leland Stanford to produce photographic evidence that, while a horse was running, all four of it’s legs left the ground at some point. He proved this by devising a series of 12 cameras with trip wires that were triggered when the horse ran past. This would take many years to accomplish but would inspire him to then create the extraordinary body of work for which he is best known today.

Wanting to further explore the innovations he had realized, Muybridge spent three years in Philadelphia; using as many as 48 separate cameras to record men, women, children and animals performing simple tasks like walking, running, and jumping. The gallery will present a selection from each of these categories.

Published in 1887 as “Animal Locomotion, An electro-photographic investigation of consecutive phases of Animal movements, 1872 – 1885,” this body of 781 unique studies was collected by the likes of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the artist Augustus Saint Gaudens, President Ulysses S. Grant as well as the Emperor of China.

Muybridge will  conclude Jan. 29th, 2017.

For More Information: Wessel + O’Connor

Preview: Hommage à Christian Bouqueret, Gitterman Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 6, 2016 at 3:40 pm

Aurel Bauh, Untitled, c. 1930

While America and France have long had their ups and downs, not a single US citizen can deny that the French have long had style and a profound love of the arts. Christian Bouqueret, who passed in 2013, was a prominent French art historian, curator and collector. His collection of vintage photography is truly a sight to behold, which is exactly what inspired Gitterman Gallery with its latest exhibit. Tom Gitterman considered Bouqueret to be a mentor and friend, which will make this exhibit particularly significant to the gallery.

Bouqueret was instrumental in rediscovering the work of many photographers during the interwar period. This exhibition will include work by many of those artists including: Aurel Bauh, Pierre Boucher, Roger Catherineau, Yvonne Chevalier, Laure Albin Guillot, Pierre Jahan, Francois Kollar, Eli Lotar, Daniel Masclet, Jean Moral, Roger Parry, Andre Steiner, Maurice Tabard and Ubac.  Bouqueret “felt that people were always being shown the same images and there was a whole range of photographers who deserved attention.” He stated that: “I don’t look for obviously attractive images; I believe that beauty unveils itself and that mystery is a part of it.”

Christian Bouqueret became interested in the modernity of Bauhaus photography during his art history studies in Berlin. Bouqueret was co-director of Bouqueret-Lebon Gallery from 1990-1997, which represented both contemporary German and French photography. He published many catalogs during his lifetime, including Assia sublime modèle, Les Femme Photographes, and books on Daniel Masclet, Jean Moral, Roger Parry, André Steiner, Raoul Ubac, and René Zuber. Bouqueret’s seminal 1997 book, Des années folles aux années noires: La nouvelle vision photographique en France 1920-1940, which presented over seventy photographers from the period, won the Prix Nadar photography book award. Bouqueret curated 200 vintage prints from his collection for the 2009 Jeu de Paume exhibition entitled Paris capitale photographique 1920-1940: Collection Christian Bouqueret. In 2011 the Pompidou Centre acquired nearly 7,000 photographs from Bouqueret’s collection, which was considered one of the best privately-owned Modernist photography collections in France. The following year the Pompidou exhibited a selection of the collection and published an accompanying catalog titled Voici Paris: Modernités Photographiques, 1920-1950. As Andy Grunberg writes in the Jeu de Paume catalog: “what we know of the history of photography is a result or sum of what has been preserved, collected, exhibited and published.” Thanks to Christian Bouqueret, that history is richer.

The “Hommage” is now available for viewing and will run until January 21st, 2017.

For More Information: Gitterman Gallery

On site: “Pauses” (Unplugged), Photographs by Dominique Philippe Bonnet, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 1, 2016 at 2:00 pm

Pause 10 by Dominique  Bonnet

Pause 10, Dominique Philippe Bonnet

As far as he’s concerned, D. P. Bonnet is quite sensitive about the passing of time.

“It seems to me that we are in life like runners. During the race, one sees the environment like a trail which is more or less hazy or multi-colored. I use photography to capture our world in motion and show how this world is a succession of scenes generating emotions, but whose shades often seem to escape one’s conscious feeling, as it’s too ephemeral.”

His series of photographic meditations are worthy of your stopping off from a busy day.

Now through December 31.

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery

Preview: Deborah Turbeville, Deborah Bell Photographs

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 26, 2016 at 12:18 am

DTF-Installation_17.jpg

In 2013, the world lost one of its most keen eyes and talented people behind the lens in Deborah Turbeville. She was a savant in the world of fashion photography and influenced countless people the followed. Deborah Bell Photographs will celebrate the holidays with a retrospective of Turbeville’s work.

Turbeville is known for her iconoclastic fashion photographs, elaborate tableaux that depict brooding, introspective models wearing haute-couture clothing and posed in barren, desolate settings. Her pictures were widely published in the editorial pages of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Essence, Nova, Mirabella, The New York Times Magazine, and other major publications. Advertising clients included Comme des Garçons, Ralph Lauren, Valentino and Calvin Klein; and department stores such as Barney’s, Bloomingdale’s and Saks Fifth Avenue. A former fashion editor for the The Ladies Home Journal, Harper’s Bazaar and Mademoiselle, Turbeville began taking photographs in the 1960s; however, she had no formal training until 1966 when she enrolled in a six-month photography workshop given by Richard Avedon and the art director Marvin Israel. As Turbeville told The New York Times in 1981, “If it hadn’t been for the two of them, I wouldn’t have taken my photography seriously.” Another mentor was Gösta Peterson whose free-form approach with animated models greatly inspired Turbeville. She also acknowledged the influence of European films of the 1970s, especially those by Bertolucci and Antonioni.

Turbeville was not only prolific and internationally published as an image-maker, but was also a maverick printmaker. She used unusual papers, experimented with toning and alternative processes, and intentionally scratched her negatives. Never in search of the pristine object, she strove instead for imperfection and a sense of timelessness. She often constructed collages of photographs that are either pinned or taped to hand-made paper, imbuing the works with a sense of decay and enabling their deterioration. Throughout her career Turbeville traveled widely and concentrated on many themes in addition to fashion. The many books she published from her œuvre include Wallflower (1978); Women on Women (1979); Unseen Versailles (1982); Les amoureuses du temps passé (1987); Newport Remembered with Louis Auchincloss (1994); Studio St. Petersburg (1997); Le passé imparfait (2009); Casa No Name (2009); and Deborah Turbeville: The Fashion Pictures (2011).

The exhibit will  conclude on January 28th, 2017.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Preview: Scranton Notorious, Curated by Bernie Andreoli from the Collection of Nick Petula, CameraWork Gallery, Scranton, PA

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 16, 2016 at 10:04 am

Mug Shot from Collection of Nick Petula

Prison photographs, or mug shots, hold a unique place in portrait photography. While many portraits are taken and published with the permission of the subject – and often highlight a person in a presentable state – there’s no choice for the subject in prison. Is a mug shot representative of someone in their most candid state? If not, it’s a least a prime low point for any individual. CameraWork gallery will be delving into the medium with their latest exhibit: Mug Shots from the collection of Nick Petula, curated by Bernie Andreoli.

Curator’s Statement:

The spark for this show began three years ago when my friend Nick Petula asked me to scan part of his collection of 100-year-old Scranton Police Department mug shots.  They intrigued me.   I couldn’t get the images, descriptions of the criminals and description of crimes out of my head.  The images are wonderful examples of basic informational portraits yet they appear to have been made by a true photographic artist.  The frontal image with an expressionless stare and piercing eyes and the casual profile belie the reason for the images to be made.  A meld of art, history and the foibles of man.

The exhibit will  conclude December 30th.

For More Information: CameraWork Gallery

Notable: National Library of France Acquires Works by Wendy Paton

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 14, 2016 at 4:23 pm

Photograms: Literary #27, Wendy Paton

It’s always something special for a photographer when a significant museum or collector acquires some of his or her work. For Wendy Paton, a pleasant surprise such as this just occurred. Paton’s latest body of work, Photograms: Literary, and selections from the series, Visages de Nuit, have been purchased by the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (National Library of France) for its permanent collection. 

Wendy Paton is an award winning American photographer, best known for her dramatic black and white candid, nocturnal portraits.  Still working with film and printing in a traditional darkroom setting, she now splits her creative life between her studio in Lambertville, New Jersey and Paris.
Paton’s keen interest in photography began in 1981 while in the throes of a groundbreaking career training and driving Standardbred racehorses. She went on to study at the International Center of Photography in New York City, learning the intricacies of night photography from Michael Kenna and darkroom printing from her mentor and collaborator, master printer, Chuck Kelton.
Paton had her first solo exhibition in New York City at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery in 2010 and has had numerous exhibitions in galleries and museums throughout the U.S. and Europe.
In 2012 the launch of her first monograph, Visages de Nuit, published by Kehrer Verlag, coincided with the solo museum exhibition,
Wendy Paton:  Visages de Nuit, in Moscow at the Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography.  In 2014 Paton’s first U. S. solo museum exhibition, WENDY PATON | NUIT BLANCHE, opened at The James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.  Her images have been published in international publications as well as exhibition and museum catalogs, and appeared on CNN and Russia Today television.
Her photographs are included in the permanent collections of Musee de la Photographie, James A. Michener Art Museum, Lumiere Brothers Center of Photography in Moscow, International Center of Photography, Bibliotheque Nationale de France, Personal Collection of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco as well as other notable private collections.
“Paton’s images are portraits and stories captured with the craft of perception and the energy of visual instinct.  Her eye is that of celebrant as well as voyeur, and in graphic compositions of black and white, she offers personal and intimate glimpses of our human, ineffable presence”.  Philip Clark, The ARTPOINT
In a related note, Photograms: Literary, the monograph will be published in 2017.
For More Information: Wendy Paton

Preview: North Dakota, Stephen Perloff, Santa Bannon Gallery,

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on November 11, 2016 at 4:23 pm

North Dakota #3, Stephen Perloff

For much of the country, North Dakota is known for little besides good hockey, Carson Wentz, oil and a certain Coen Brothers film. But now, for photography buffs, Photo Review founder Stephen Perloff’s latest series should add to the list of North Dakota familiarity.

Stephen Perloff is the founder and editor of The Photo Review, a critical journal of international scope publishing since 1976, and editor of The Photograph Collector, the leading source of information on the photography art market. He has taught photography and the history of photography at numerous Philadelphia-area colleges and universities and has been the recipient of two grants from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts for arts criticism. He was the recipient of the Sol Mednick Award for 2000 from the Mid-Atlantic region of the Society for Photographic Education, the first annual Vanguard Award from the Philadelphia Center for the Photographic Image in 2007, and the Colin Ford Award for Curatorship from the Royal Photographic Society in 2012.

 

His photographs have appeared in numerous exhibitions and reside in many museum and private collections, including those of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the George Eastman Museum, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Lehigh University, and Haverford College. His exhibition, “Unseen Color, Part I,” was shown at The Light Room Gallery, Philadelphia, in March and April 2012; and “Unseen Color, Part II: East and West” was on view at The Light Room in May and June 2013. His work was recently included in the exhibitions “An Evolving Legacy: Twenty Years of Collecting at the Michener Art Museum” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (June 2009 – January 2010); “Streets of Philadelphia: Photography 1970–1985” at The Print Center, Philadelphia (fall 2009); “The Silver Garden” at the Philadelphia Museum of Art (February– July 2005); “Continuum: Photography in Philadelphia: Past, Present, and Future” at the Free Library of Philadelphia (March–July 2007); “Filling the Frame” at Photo West Gallery, Philadelphia (April 2007), and “Hot Topic,” a show about global warming, at The Germantown Academy (fall 2007). His work was included in the exhibition “Making Magic: Beauty in Word and Image” at the James A. Michener Art Museum (November 3, 2012 – March 31, 2013), and images from “Unseen Color” were shown at the InVision Photography Festival in Bethlehem, PA, from October 2012 to January 2013. In 2013 his work was seen at the State Theater in Easton, PA (February–March) and at the Red Filter Gallery in Lambertville, NJ (March–April). “West Philly Days,” an exhibition of images made between 1967 and 1976, was shown in West Philadelphia at The Gold Standard in September–October 2014.

 The exhibit will come to a close November 30th.

For More Information: Santa Bannon Fine Arts

 

Preview: Wynn Bullock & Morley Baer: Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 7, 2016 at 2:55 pm

Wynn Bullock, Solarization, c. 1940

Solarization, Wynn Bullock, 1940

Scott Nichols latest gallery, starring the works of Wynn Bullock and Morley Baer, was supposed to finish at the end of October. But the gallery is pleased to inform the public that it will be extending the exhibit through November 12th.

The Scott Nichols Gallery is a fine art photography gallery located in downtown San Francisco. The gallery shows a combination of established, up and coming and contemporary photographers.

Scott Nichols, a Southern California native, has been a private dealer since 1980. He is considered one of the experts on Group f/64 and Brett Weston. The gallery opened in 1992 and houses one of the largest private collections of Brett Weston photographs as well as an extensive inventory of photographs by classic California photographers such as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Imogen Cunningham, Ruth Bernhard, Wynn Bullock, and William Garnett.

Though the gallery is located in the upscale gallery district of the Union Square area, Scott Nichols has a very casual and friendly style. This is not the typical white walled gallery affair.

After the current exhibit comes to a close, Nichols will be wasting no time with bringing another up for availability. Conversations with the Dead & the Bikeriders, works by Danny Lyon, will open November 15th. Stay tuned for more information regarding the future exhibit.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Preview: A Matter of Memory: Photography as Object in the Digital Age, Eastman Museum, Rochester, NY

In Art Museum, Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 3, 2016 at 2:55 pm

 

It’s common lore known amongst photography buffs, but it’s worth mentioning once more. Kodak was one the master of the film world, standing atop a powerful media medium that never seemed like it would die. Of course, that was before it helped develop the digital camera. Fast forward to the present and Kodak has essentially put itself out of business. Digital cameras are thriving, and we now how two decades worth of their influence.

The Eastman Museum’s latest exhibition explores just this with the works of a sample of today’s great photographers.

With the convenience and ubiquity of computers and smartphones, the majority of photographic images are being recorded digitally rather than on film. As this transformation has broadened access to photographic images—both in making and in viewing—in many contexts it has also obviated the need for photographic prints. Snapshooters, photojournalists, and commercial photographers rarely produce material objects as the final step in their process. As a consequence, photographs in the form of image-bearing sheets of paper are scarce outside of the art world.

Because personal and collective memories are so inextricably intertwined with photographs—the result of the medium’s progressive saturation of everyday life for the past century and a half—this revolutionary change in the production and dissemination of photographic images is altering society’s relationship to memory.

In the midst of this change, many contemporary photographers are making work that addresses, either directly or obliquely, the potential consequences of the medium’s metamorphosis. Some artists dig deep into photographic materials as though searching for the locus of memory, while others incorporate found snapshots into their work as virtual talismans of recollection. Both kinds of work highlight the presence of the photographic object and function as self-conscious meditations on photography’s ongoing reorganization of our mental and physical landscape.

The exhibit, sponsored b Deborah Ronnen and Sherman Levey, will feature works by photographers such as Anotny Cairns, Ellen Care, Phil Chang, Jason Lazarus, Diane Meer, Taryn Simon, and more. The exhibit is now open and will conclude January 29, 2017

For More Information: Eastman Museum

“Each Passion”, Photographs by Shawn Ehlers, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 1, 2016 at 6:51 am

Ravenhair by Shawn Ehlers

Ravenhair,  Shawn Ehlers

Haunting and mysterious, as befits this time of year, Shawn Ehlers presents us with work that needs to be contemplated at a measured pace.

I’ve come back to my roots with photography, shooting exclusively with various Polaroid cameras. I find the film produces a magic image which scanned during the development of the photo is then printed using watercolor textured archival paper and ink.

Now through November 30

To view the exhibition: Red Filter Gallery