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Posts Tagged ‘Ed Templeton’

Preview: Amalgamated Fragments, Ed Templeton, Danziger Gallery, NYC

In Gallery on June 26, 2017 at 11:00 am

For many, what we once set forth to do in life eventually wears thin or simply no longer holds the same sheen it once did. Sometimes what we still want to do is no longer an option. This leads us towards new passions, such as photography. For Ed Templeton, once a figure within the skateboarding world, this is exactly the case. And now Danziger Gallery is providing his very first exhibit in New York.

A California native, Templeton grew up and still lives in the suburbs of Orange County. His photographs tell the story of the worlds he knows – the pangs and passion of youth, the beauty and tackiness of Southern California, and the exhilaration and exhaustion of the skateboard world he starred in.

While Templeton originally gained fame as a skateboarder, turning professional in 1990 and founding his own skateboard company, he always felt a need for creative expression both athletically and artistically. Influenced by professional skateboarders who did their own graphics and art, Templeton began to create works in multiple mediums – painting, photography, and sculpture. He continued to tour the world as a skateboarder, but over time (and injury), his art became his primary focus.

Around 1994 Templeton had become associated with a group of west coast artists whose styles and distribution channels originated largely outside of the art world, and included an interest in pop culture iconography, a commitment to be true and unpretentious, and a strong do-it-yourself attitude.

Collectively titled “Beautiful Losers” the group included Shepard Fairey, Mark Gonzales, Margaret Kilgallen, Barry McGee, and Ryan McGinley among others and was documented in an influential film, book, and touring exhibition.

While Templeton’s photography is entirely self-taught, it would be a mistake to label him an outsider artist. He is well aware of what he is doing, the intricacies of his craft, and the moment to press the shutter. Think of a young Lartigue growing up in a working class family in SoCal as opposed to a rich cosmopolitan milieu.

Templeton documents the people and places he encounters in a rich stream of images – of himself and his wife Deanna, of the everyday people who hang out at Huntington Beach, and the places he passes in his car. He collects images of themes that he feels drawn to – teen smokers and kissers; surfers and skaters; public displays of religion, politics and self-expression.

Templeton likes to present his photographs in a non-hierarchical manner, large quantities mixed up together in irregular clusters. He hangs works in the shape of what he calls “image clouds.” In Templeton’s way of seeing we recognize the fascination of the passer-by gripped at some unexpected moment by the “extraordinary of the ordinary”, the exceptional and existential moments of daily life. It’s the best and truest tradition of photography – always ready to surprise when a new voice or vision looks at the world afresh with the same old Leica.

Now open, Danziger Gallery will be exhibiting Amalgamated Fragments until July 27th.

For More Information: Danzinger Gallery

Preview: Beyond Fashion, Woman in Landscape, Deborah Bell Photographs, NYC

In Gallery on June 19, 2017 at 11:00 am

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deborah Bell Photographs is presenting a unique and beautiful exhibit celebrating one of photography’s most celebrated subjects – women.

Deborah Bell Photographs is pleased to present a group exhibition of
photographs based on a theme long favored in art: woman in the landscape.
Inspired by the progressive photographs made by James Moore, Gösta Peterson,
William Silano, and Deborah Turbeville for the editorial pages of leading fashion
magazines in the 1960s and 1970s, this exhibition features prints by those
photographers, and by Susan Paulsen and Marcia Resnick, and incorporates
selected photographs by Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Harry Callahan, Louis
Faurer, and Lee Friedlander. We are also delighted to include 19th century
prints by Roger Fenton, Charles Nègre, Sydney Richard Percy, and Nevil Story Maskelyne, antecedents whose photographs, made more than a century earlier,
convey early explorations of this traditional genre.

To celebrate the exhibit, a reception will be held this Wednesday, on June 21st from 6 to 8 pm.

For More Information: Deborah Bell