BWGallerist

Posts Tagged ‘Howard Greenberg’

Preview: Steve Schapiro, Heroic Times, Howard Greenberg Gallery

In Exhibits, Gallery on November 29, 2017 at 11:30 am

Steve Schapiro, Nico in Times Square, 1972, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

An exciting new exhibition will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York this winter featuring the work of renowned photographer Steve Schapiro. Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times, will feature prominent works produced over the span of sixty years by the artist, some which will be on showcase to the public for the first time ever.

Heroic Times marks the inaugural exhibition of Steve Schapiro’s work at the Gallery. Schapiro has witnessed key moments of American history and culture, from the Selma to Montgomery civil rights march to Robert F. Kennedy’s 1968 presidential campaign to Andy Warhol’s Factory to the filming of Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. An opening reception with the artist will be held on December 14 from 6-8 p.m.

Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times will survey American milestones from the photographer’s nearly six decade career, with a focus on the 1960s and ‘70s. A number of the photographs are unpublished and on public view for the first time. With assignments from Life, Time, Newsweek, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone and many other publications, he captured iconic and humanistic images of politicians, celebrities, artists, and newsmakers in action.

“I am always seeking the image that conveys the spirit of the person,” Schapiro noted. “At the same time, as a photojournalist, I want to create an image so that people will understand what news is being made.”

During Robert F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign, Schapiro traveled with and got to know the young U.S. senator from New York, who greatly impressed him. Also during that time, Schapiro documented the civil rights movement, making photographs of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and many others who fought for social justice.

Schapiro’s subjects extended beyond politics into the worlds of film, rock and roll, and art. He documented The Godfather, Taxi Driver, The Way We Were, Midnight Cowboy, andChinatown. Among the luminaries were David Bowie, Samuel Beckett, Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, Barbra Streisand, and Nico, who sang with the Velvet Underground.

About Steve Schapiro
Steve Schapiro was born in New York City in 1934. His formal education in photography began when he studied with W. Eugene Smith in the early 1960s. In 1961, Schapiro began to work as a freelance photojournalist, his photographs appearing in magazines including Life, Look, Time, Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Sports Illustrated, andPeople.

Schapiro’s photographs have been widely reproduced in magazines and books related to American cultural history from the 1960s, civil rights, and motion pictures. Monographs of Schapiro’s work include Schapiro’s Heroes, 2007, which offers intimate profiles of ten iconic figures. Recently, Powerhouse published Bliss, 2015, about the changing hippie generation; Bowie, 2016; and Misericordia, 2016, about a facility for people with disabilities. This year,  Taschen published The Fire Next Time with text by James Baldwin and Schapiro’s civil rights photographs from 1963 to 1968. Powerhouse will publishMuhammad Ali in spring, 2018.

Museums and galleries have exhibited Schapiro’s photographs worldwide. The High Museum of Art’s Road to Freedom, which traveled widely in the United States, includes numerous photographs from the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr. by Schapiro. Recent solo shows have been mounted in Los Angeles, London, Santa Fe, Amsterdam, Paris, and Berlin. He has had large museum retrospective exhibitions in the United States, Spain, Russia, and Germany.

Schapiro’s work is represented in many private and public collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Museum, Washington D.C.; The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; and the High Museum of Art, Atlanta. In September, he received the James Joyce Award from University College in Dublin. In October he won a Lucie award for achievement in photojournalism. He lives and works in Chicago.

Steve Schapiro: Heroic Times will be on view December 14, 2017- January 27, 2018. Mark your calendars, because this is not a show to miss! For more information contact Howard Greenberg Gallery.

 

Preview: Skēnē by Alex Majoli, & Wegee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 21, 2017 at 10:36 am
Alex-majoli-scene-6404

Scene #6404, Cairo, Egypt, Celebrating Mubarak’s resignation in Tahir Square, February 11, 2001, Alex Majoli

Howard Greenberg Gallery is bracing against the February cold with a pair of exciting exhibitions, featured the beloved Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and Alex Majoli.

Alex Majoli:

Alex Majoli (b. Ravenna, Italy, 1971) attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, and while at school traveled to Yugoslavia a number of times to document political conflicts. He graduated in 1991. Three years later, his career began after he photographed the closing of a notorious asylum on the island of Leros in Greece, which resulted in his first monograph entitled Leros. In 1995, Majoli went to South America for several months, photographing a variety of subjects for his ongoing series on Brazil, Tudo Bom. He began the series Hotel Marinum in 1998 documenting life in harbor cities around the world. Also that year, he began making a series of short films and documentaries.

Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theatre. Majoli is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, and the show is his first gallery exhibition in New York City. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Weegee:

As a photographer and photojournalist, Arthur Fellig (Weegee) was in his own words “spellbound by the mystery of murder.” His uncanny ability to make early appearances at scenes of violence and catastrophe earned him the name Weegee (appropriated from the Ouija board). His film noir style and dry wit combined with his sensational images of the naked city, often taken at night with a strong flash, have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th century.

Among the highlights in the exhibition will be a 1936 self portrait of Weegee getting his own mug shot at a police station. A series of portraits of people looking up in the sky from 1945 depicts children, a police officer, a man with a telescope, and a nun all watching a fire. A 1943 image entitled The Critic, depicts a disdainful onlooker checking out two ornately dressed women on their way to the opera. A touching photograph from c. 1944 shows two animal caretakers sleeping next to a pen with two giraffes at Madison Square Garden.

Both exhibitions are now open and will conclude on the most foolish of days, April 1st.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: “A New and Mysterious Art” Ancient Photographic Methods in Contemporary Art, Curated by Jerry Spagnoli, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 12, 2016 at 11:52 am
Vera Lutter Cold Spring IX print

Cold Spring, IX: February 17, 2014, by Vera Lutter

Howard Greenberg Gallery has worked with Jerry Spagnoli to create a unique gallery experience this fall.

Tired of going to run-of-the-mill photography exhibitions?  This premier New York gallery will be focusing on 19th century photo techniques – daguerreotypes, photogenic drawings, calotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, and camera obscuras – for modern use. The photographers featured include Takashi Arai, Stephen Berkman, Dan Estabrook,Adm Fuss,Luther Gerlach, and more.

The pre-industrial period from 1839 (when photography was invented) through the 1860s was a seminal time, when the pioneers of the medium used experimental, hand-fabricated methods to capture light. The resulting images had an immediacy and unpredictability that drew attention to the illusory nature of the nascent endeavor. The title of the exhibition at Howard Greenberg Gallery is drawn from an 1857 essay about the relationship between art and photography by Lady Elizabeth Eastlake, a British author, art critic and art historian. She wrote, “It is now more than fifteen years ago that specimens of a new and mysterious art were first exhibited to our wondering gaze.”

Industrialization homogenized the photographic documentation of the visual world, making the results more predictable. In reaction, the artists in “A New and Mysterious Art”: Ancient Photographic Methods in Contemporary Art acknowledge and embrace the primitive forms of photography. Utilizing these early methods – and equipment – today allows for a newly personalized expression and a direct engagement with the medium.  Among the works on view will be daguerreotypes by Takashi Arai; albumen prints from wet-plate collodion negatives by Stephen Berkman; salt prints from calotype negatives by Dan Estabrook; daguerreotypes by Adam Fuss; relievo ambrotypes by Luther Gerlach; work made using a room-sized camera obscura by Vera Lutter; wet-plate still lifes, portraits and figure studies by Sally Mann; ambrotypes by Matthias Olmeta; pigment prints from photogenic drawings by France Scully Osterman & Mark Osterman; and daguerreotypes and wet-plate collodion ambrotypes by Craig Tuffin.

About Jerry Spagnoli

Jerry Spagnoli (b. New York, 1956), a photographer since the mid-1970s, is considered the leading expert in the revitalization of the daguerreotype process, a complex photographic technique invented in 1839 that produces images on highly polished, silver clad copper plates. Since 1994, he has experimented with 19th-century materials and studied the effects achieved by early practitioners in order to understand the technical aspects of the process, as well as its expressive, visual potential as a medium. Spagnoli began work on an ongoing photographic series entitled The Last Great Daguerreian Survey of the 20th Century in 1995. The project features views of the New York as well as images of historically significant events including the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11, the vigil following the disappearance of John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Times Square at midnight on the eve of the new millennium and the first Inauguration of President Obama. Spagnoli is also known for his collaboration with artist Chuck Close on daguerreotype portraits and nudes.

The exhibit will open September 15th and conclude October 29th. 

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Attitude: Portraits by Mary Ellen Mark, 1964-2015, Howard Greenberg Gallery, Aquebogue, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on April 28, 2016 at 12:57 pm
Image by Mary Ellen Mark

Image by Mary Ellen Mark

Mary Ellen Mark unfortunately passed away last year, leaving behind a long legacy of photography. Howard Greenberg Gallery is pleased to showcase her work this spring.

Mary Ellen Mark, who passed away last year, is known for her photojournalism, documentary photography, and notably, her portraiture. Attitude: Portraits by Mary Ellen Mark, 1964–2015 is curated by Melissa Harris, editor-at-large, Aperture Foundation, who notes, “In choosing the images from among many of her key series, I was defining attitude in terms of a sense of self, a kind of awareness and confidence, self-possession.”

The exhibition surveys highlights from many of her series including Indian Circus, humorous and bizarre shots of performers and contortionists and their animals from India’s liveliest circuses; and Falkland Road, gritty images of prostitutes and their patrons on a notorious street in Bombay.  Selections from Twins and Prom explore – in large format Polaroids – siblings at the Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio, and prom-goers across the U.S. Images from Mark’s work for LIFE magazine about the Damms, a homeless family in California, express the grim reality of survival on spare change and welfare checks.

Also on view will be work from Streetwise, which portrays homeless and troubled youth in Seattle including a girl named Tiny. Work from Tiny: Streetwise Revisited, her series completed in 2015, encapsulates Mark’s 30-plus years photographing Tiny, now a middle-aged mother of ten. Mark also photographed on film sets and is known for her celebrity portraits including images of Marlon Brando, Sean Penn, Woody Allen, and Yoko Ono.

The exhibition will open on May 5th and run until June 19th, 2016. In conjunction to the Howard Greenberg show, Aperture in New York City will open Tiny: Streetwise Revisited, Photographs by Mary Ellen Mark, on May 26th, and conclude on June 30th.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: “Kathy Ryan’s Office Romance”, Howard Greenberg Gallery, NYC

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on April 21, 2016 at 3:08 pm

 

Image Courtesy of Kathy Ryan and Howard Greenberg Gallery

Image Courtesy of Kathy Ryan and Howard Greenberg Gallery

Too often, the concept of a muse is myopically stereotyped to the form of a woman. Since the dawn of artistic free thought, inspiration has been all around artists to draw upon, which is exactly what photographer Kathy Ryan did in New York City. She fell in love with Renzo Piano’s New York Times building and hasn’t stopped shooting it since.

In the words of architect Renzo Piano, his New York Timesbuilding was “all about the light, and the vibration of light and shadow.” Working on the 6th floor of the building, Ryan admired how the light of New York City would stream in from the large clear glass windows and cast spectacular architectural shadows from the unusual ceramic rods that encase the building. In the fall of 2012, Kathy Ryan saw a zigzag of light on a staircase and grabbed her iPhone to take a picture. From then on, she was hooked. On a regular basis, she comes in early or stays late or returns on weekends to capture the luminous quality of the light. Among her favorite spots are an eastside corner on the 6th floor in the mornings and the west side of the building on the 15th floor at sunset.

The longtime director of photography at the New York Times Magazine, Kathy Ryan has been a pioneer of combining fine art photography with photojournalism in the pages of the publication. During her time there, the Magazine has been recognized with numerous photography awards, including National Magazine Awards. In 2012, Ryan received the Royal Photographic Society’s annual award for Outstanding Service to Photography. In 2014, she won the Vision award from the Center for Photography at Woodstock. Under Ryan’s leadership, the Magazine commissions the world’s best photographers, a selection of whose work was published inThe New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture, 2011), edited by Ryan. She also lectures on photography (she gave the 2012 Karsh Lecture in Photography at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) and serves as a mentor at the School of Visual Arts.

Kathy Ryan’s Office Romance will be on display from May 5th to June 19th, 2016.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Everglades and Unnamed Road, Jungjin Lee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photographer on November 24, 2015 at 6:23 pm
Unnamed Road 060, Jungjin Lee, 2011

Unnamed Road 060, Jungjin Lee, 2011

Howard Greenberg Gallery has brought in artist Jungjin Lee for the holidays. On display will be not one but two different photo sets by the Korean.

Jungjin Lee’s photography is imbued with elemental vastness and wonder. A former assistant of Robert Frank, she creates meditative landscapes with a unique interplay between image and material, capturing moments in time that are uniquely her own. Using a multilayered process that integrates elements of painting, Lee’s photographs exude a materiality not often found in photography. She aims to find “a fundamental essence of things being captured through my intuition, the inner state of my mind, beyond my thinking.”

Lee was one of twelve renowned photographers who traveled to Israel and the West Bank between 2009 and 2013 to create work for This Place, a major traveling exhibition initiated by Frederic Brenner, which will be exhibited at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach from October 15, 2015 – January 17, 2016 and the Brooklyn Museum from February 12 – June 5, 2016.

Of her work in Israel and the West Bank, Lee has said, “What I am searching for in my photographs is something about life. It’s about the solitary state of being human. Life changes on the surface, like an ocean. You have the constant movement of water on the surface, but deep down, at the core there is no movement.”

Unnamed Road/Everglades will be exhibited through December 12, 2015.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Dave Heath and Brassaï, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on October 12, 2015 at 12:13 pm

Dave Heath, New York City, 1964

Dave Heath, New York City, 1964

Howard Greenberg Gallery is going to be dishing out a pair of exhibits thins month to both fascinate and enthrall B&W fans in the Tri-State area. First off, Dave Heath will be on display in concurrence to the travelling exhibit that is arriving at the Philadelphia Museum of Art:

Embodying the pure essence of black-and-white photography, Dave Heath’s masterful work from the 1950s and ’60s will be exhibited at Howard Greenberg Gallery from September 10 – October 24, 2015. The show is concurrent with the traveling exhibition Multitude, Solitude: The Photographs of Dave Heath at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, September 19, 2015 – February 21, 2016. A new book of the same title by Keith F. Davis and Michael Torosian will be published in October 2015 by the Hall Family Foundation/Nelson-Atkins Museum/Yale University Press.

Dave Heath’s expressive and emotionally charged photographs capture intimate moments of beauty and loss, love and alienation, with lone figures gazing into the distance, soldiers trudging through foreign lands, urban scenes of heightened sensation and faces frozen in time. On view at Howard Greenberg Gallery will be Heath’s photographs from the Korean War and the Beat Generation era in Greenwich Village, pages from his thematic notebooks mounted with tiny prints, and work that was included in his seminal 1965 book A Dialogue with Solitude, a poignant collection of images that explores the human psyche in chiaroscuro tones. A key figure in 20th-century photography, adept in delineating details and dissolving others, Heath is known as a master print maker with a deep and atmospheric palette.

If that’s not enough to whet your palette, a unique collection from Brassaï – that played muse for writer Henry Miller – available through October 24th.

These 27 photographs by Brassaï (1899-1984) were used to illustrate the first edition of Henry Miller’s novella Quiet Days in Clichy. Published in 1956, the novella is based on Miller’s rousing experiences as a struggling writer in Paris. The prints are distinct in that they show the crop marks that were followed in the design and production of the tall, narrow Miller novella. Many of the iconic images in this exhibition were also published in earlier books by Brassaï, including Paris de Nuit (1933) and Voluptés de Paris (1935).  The success of these books earned Brassaï the nickname “the eye of Paris.” In 1975, Brassaï published the biography, Henry Miller: The Paris Years, about their years together in the City of Light.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Staff Picks IV, Howard Greenburg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on December 29, 2014 at 1:45 pm

 

Manhattan Through a Window, 1930s, Walker Evans

Manhattan Through a Window, 1930s, Walker Evans

For the fourth year now, Howard Greenburg Gallery’s staff has put their minds together in order to curate a distinct exhibition unlike any found during the rest of the year. Each staff member faced the tall task of choosing five photographs from an inventory of 30,000. Now, the results of their work are ready for the public’s eye.

An eclectic group of images chosen by the entire gallery staff, includes an array of both well-known and unknown works by:
Bruce Davidson, Walker Evans, Louis Faurer, William Gedney, Bedrich Grunzweig, Dave Heath, Consuelo Kanaga, James Karales, Saul Leiter, Leon Levenstein, Joel Meyerowitz, Marvin Newman, Ruth Orkin, W. Eugene Smith, Iwao Yamawaki, Weegee, as well as many others.
Our gallery’s staff is comprised of seventeen unique individuals with a wide range of experience in photography; however, we all share a specialized bond in our unwavering appreciation of the medium. While some members of the staff selected images based on a theme or a specific aesthetic, others selected randomly, both approaches give the viewer insight as to the similarities and differences in how we all see and what moves us.
The gallery opened the exhibit on December 11th and will make it available to view until January 24th.
For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Berenice Abbott and Charles Marville: The City In Transition, Howard Greene Gallery, New York City

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 3, 2014 at 11:36 am
New York City 1930s, Berenice Abbot (left) and Paris 1860s, Charles Marville (right)

New York City 1930s, Berenice Abbot (left) and Paris 1860s, Charles Marville (right)

Photography is often a medium to document our world, so that we might reflect and analyze in an effort to better understand it. It comes as little surprise, consequently, that since the camera arose simultaneously with industry and urbanization, photographers have kept close tabs on their homes of steel, cement, bright lights and smog. The exhibit will juxtapose New York and Paris, each through one of its noted photographers.

Inspired by Eugène Atget, whom she had met in Paris shortly before he died, Abbott had been struck by what she described as the “unadorned realism” of his photographs.  Every Wednesday she documented the social, commercial, and architectural aspects of New York City. From an Esso gas station to the Lyric Theater to the elevated Second and Third Avenue train lines, Abbott focused her lens on all aspects of the city including busy commercial streets, row houses, parks, docks, and bridges in all five boroughs – a project that would stand as the centerpiece of her career.

As official photographer for the city of Paris, Marville recorded the disappearance of the Old Paris and also focused on the creation of the new city, an urban vision that dominates Paris even today. From 1865 to 1869, his subjects ranged from a spectacularly elaborate wrought iron gate at Parc Monceau to a gas lamp suspended from an arcade at the Louvre to a street lamp and view at Gare de l’Ouest in Montparnasse.

 The exhibit will run through April 11.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Still time to see, Carrie Furnaces: Contemporary Views at Silver Eye Center for Photography

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on August 20, 2013 at 3:47 pm

carrie furnaces

A collaborative exhibition curated from an open call for entries of images taken at the historic blast furnace site located in Rankin, PA.

“Chuck Beard; Charlene Bidula; Nyna Bryant; Ohad Cadji; Jill Dittmer; Alexis Dillon; Brad Fetchin; Scott Goldsmith; Howard Grill; Jeremy Guttman; Ellen Bjerklie Hanna; Douglas Harper; David Issod; Jessica Kalmar; Jay Kapadia; Ryan Keene; Mandy Kendall; David Kissell; George Kollar; Robert Kormos; Dale Lazar; Robert G. Myers; Michael Novara; Adam Piscitelli; Neal Ryan; John H. Schurman; Rob Schwerdt; Ivette Spradlin; Kevin N. Tomasic; Hyla Urbany; Dan Wetmore; and Becky Zahn.”

August 2 – August 24, 2013

For More Information: Silver Eye Center for Photography