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Posts Tagged ‘Joseph Bellows Gallery’

Preview: Lower Manhattan: Vintage Photographs 1975-77, Bevan Davies, Deborah Bell Photographs, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 29, 2015 at 11:51 am
480 Broadway, New York, 1979, Bevan Davies

480 Broadway, New York, 1979, Bevan Davies

New York City has served as inspiration for many, and Bevan Davies can certainly agree. His works from the mid-seventies celebrated the architecture of Lower Manhattan, and along with works from Los Angeles in 1976, will be on display next year at Deborah Bell Photographs.

Bevan Davies (American, b. 1941) studied photography with Bruce Davidson at the University of Chicago in the early 1960s and benefited greatly through mentoring from Diane Arbus later in that decade.  After a period of photographing people on the street, especially those at odds with society, in both daylight and evening hours with a hand-held camera, Davies changed his working methodology to describe the physical character of the city: the building façades, and the alleys and streets, with a tripod-mounted 5 x 7-inch view camera.

This change in subject and approach resulted in Davies’ most celebrated work.  When created in the mid-1970s, Bevan Davies’ architectural photographs situated themselves wholly within the dictum laid forth by William Jenkins as “New Topographics,” the title of the legendary exhibition Jenkins organized in 1975 at the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York.  Davies himself writes of his own approach as “an effort being made to let the camera almost see by itself.”  This notion was carried further by the late photographer Lewis Baltz who, in 1976, referred to Davies’ photographs as “rigorously contemporary, while acknowledging a use of the camera which dates from the inception of the medium.”  The images of New York façades, photographed in the early morning hours and devoid of people, describe spaces and shapes defined by light and shadow.  They depict a specific time and place, as evidenced by the window dressings and signage, and they portray a formal grace among the buildings’ details that are included within Davies’ ground glass.  The resulting 16 x 20-inch prints, with their glossy, ferrotyped surfaces and brilliant definition, are at once objective images and seductive objects.

The exhibit, which is being held in cooperation with Joseph Bellows Gallery of La Jolla, CA, will open on January 7th and conclude February 27th.

For More Information: Deborah Bell Photographs

Preview: Trees of Burgundy, Wayne Gudmundson, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on November 16, 2015 at 10:26 pm
Saizy, France #9, Wayne Gudmundson, 2014

Saizy, France #9, Wayne Gudmundson, 2014

Joseph Bellows gallery will host the fall appropriate exhibition of Wayne Gudmundson, Trees of Burgundy.

In the exhibition Trees of Burgundy, Gudmundson depicts the beauty of theFrench countryside through observing the tree-lined roads within Saizy, a small farming community in the Burgundy region of France. In his eloquently organized photographs, he shows the viewer how these trees interact with, and in some measure create the landscape to which they belong; a richly layered landscape that suggests the possibility of narrative, real or imagined.

Wayne Gudmundson is a highly regarded photographer whose work has beenwritten about by such luminaries in the field as Robert Adams, Ben Lifson, and Frank Gohlke. His photographs have been featured in numerous books including his 2007 monograph, A Considered View: The Photographs of Wayne Gudmundson. Gudmundson’s photographs are in several prominent collections, including: the Museum of Modern Art, Center for Creative Photography, Plains Art Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Simultaneously running counterpoint to Gudmunson’s solo show is a similarly themed group show called Regarding Trees. This show surveys exemplary arboreal works of both the vintage and contemporary. 

Trees Of Burgundy will be on display until December 23rd.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: “Bijou” – Box Offices, Ave Pildas, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on September 20, 2015 at 10:22 am
Untitled, from Bijou Series, Ave Pildas, 1975

Untitled, from Bijou Series, Ave Pildas, 1975

Fresh off their successful jaunt into the Americana of Roger Vail’s Carnival exhibit, Joseph Bellows Gallery continuing along a similar theme with the work of Ave Pildas. Pildas has effectively captured the essence of classic theaters, whom often blended a beautiful Art Deco aesthetic with direct minimalism.

Bijou will feature Pildas’ small-scale vintage black and white photographs from the mid 1970’s. These images document, as the exhibition’s title implies, the small jewel like structures that crown the façade of their theaters. Pildas’ frontal camera position and distance to his subject remain the same in each image. This methodology forms a visual inventory of varied theater box offices; a typology that surveys the remaining traces of a vanishing architectural and cinematic culture. 

Ave Pildas’ photographs are in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Milwaukee Art Museum, New York Public Library, Bibliotheca National, and the Center for Creative Photography, among others.

Books by Pildas include: Art Deco Los Angeles (Harper and Row, 1980) and Movie Palaces (Crown Press, 1982 and reissued by Hennessy and Ingalls in 2000).

The exhibit is now open for all whom are interested and will conclude October 24th. As an additional treat, Roger Vail’s Carnival has been given an extended viewing, allowing for a double dose of great photography.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Carnival, Roger Vail, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on July 21, 2015 at 5:01 pm
Image Courtesy of Roger Vail and Joseph Bellows Gallery

Image Courtesy of Roger Vail and Joseph Bellows Gallery

Whether the Carnival fills you with fuzzy nostalgia or paralyzing fear, it’s indisputable that Roger Vail has created some beautiful images.

In 1970, Roger Vail began photographing carnivals and their thrill rides with his 8 x 10 inch view camera. His pictures were made in the evening hours with long exposure times, resulting in images that track the momentum of the ride with a sense wonderment that is both tangible and otherworldly. Carnival will feature Vail’s extraordinary, large-scale photographs of carnival rides in full motion; tracing the kaleidoscopic light play seen only through the extended moment that photography permits. In addition to the large-scale color and black and white images, his smaller, more intimate platinum/palladium prints will be featured in the atrium gallery.

Vail’s carnival rides are described and transformed through the act of photography. He allows the viewer to experience the flux of the ride in a single scene, rendering both the atmosphere of the night and the energy of his subject, against the recognizable background of the state fair.

Roger Vail earned his BFA and MFA degrees from the Art Institute of Chicago. His photographs are in the collection of numerous institutions, including: Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Princeton University Art Museum.

The exhibit is now open and available for viewing until August 22nd.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: The Wave Portfolio, Anthony Friedkin, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on June 10, 2015 at 2:55 pm
Silver Curl, Hermosa Beach, CA, Anthony Friedkin, 2005

Silver Curl, Hermosa Beach, CA, Anthony Friedkin, 2005

Mother Nature captivates us all every chance we take the time to look around. The power and wisdom within the trees. Clouds lazily adrift in the sky. At the ocean, waves might be the most pristine, sculpted and effortless entrance into chaos seen with regularity. The water looks peaceful and harmless, yet you know that another crash of whitewater isn’t far behind. Anthony Friedkin has captured this majesty within The Wave Portfolio. 

As a visual artist working in the medium of photography, it has been my desire to explore the creative and challenging possibilities of photographing waves. These photographs of ocean waves were selected from a photo essay I have been working on since 1977. It represents a very personal interpretation of more than forty-five years as a surfer and disciple of the sea. I wanted to express my feelings about the ocean – and beyond.

Many scholars believe the ocean represents our unconscious. The sound of a wave breaking underwater is like the clamor of creation itself, loud, thunderous, yet strangely harmonic and soothing. I do believe the ocean, with its jewel like waves, is where we came from; and when I’m in the water, I feel like I’m connecting to something so mighty and so primordial it’s amazing. All the mysteries of life and death, light and darkness, space and time, are to be found there. By photographing the ocean waves I hope to reveal their secrets within.

A selection of twenty, 11 x 14 inch gelatin silver prints from Anthony Friedkin’s epic Surf Essay. Produced in an edition of thirty-five, with an introduction by the artist and housed in a custom clamshell box. $15,000

For those with deep pockets, this may be a collection worth the splurge.

More Information: Joseph Bellow Gallery

Preview: New York, Bevan Davies, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery on March 16, 2015 at 9:48 pm
Bond Street, Facing North, New York, 1976, Bevan Davies

Bond Street, Facing North, New York, 1976, Bevan Davies

Buildings have always lent themselves well to black and white photography. The deliberate contours and lines of structures are wonderfully contrasted, while the geometry of an architect’s work is full celebrated. New York, of course, is a mecca for urban development and therefore a perfect place for Bevan Davies to explore and document.

Bevan Davies studied photography with Bruce Davidson, at the University of Chicago in early 1960’s and benefitted greatly through mentoring from Diane Arbus later in that decade. After working the street in both daylight and evening hours, photographing people at odds with society, with a hand camera, Davies changed his working methodology to describing the physical environs of the street: the building facades, alleys and streets with a tripod mounted view camera.

This change in subject and approach resulted in Davies most celebrated work. Created in 1975/76, Bevan Davies’ architectural photographs situated themselves wholly within the dictum laid forth by William Jenkins, as “New Topographics”. In fact, Davies writes of his approach as, “an effort being made to let the camera almost see by itself”. This notion was carried further by the late photographer, Lewis Baltz, who in 1976, referred to Davies’ photographs as, “rigorously contemporary, while acknowledging a use of the camera which dates from the inception of the medium”. The New York facades, taken in the early morning hours and devoid of people, describe spaces defined by light and shadow. They depict a specific time and place, as seen by the window dressings and signage, as well as portray a formal grace among the building’s details that are included within Davies’ camera frame. New York is the first comprehensive exhibition of Davies’ photographs in over two decades.

Opening March 14th, the public will be able to view the exhibit at Joseph bellows until May 9th.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Jetliner, Josef Hoflehner, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on June 6, 2014 at 8:51 pm
Jet Liner #35, Josef Hoflehner

Jet Liner #35, Josef Hoflehner

For many, the concept of seeing is believing has attracted many to experience the unknown and surreal. One of these attractions is not quite what you might expect. Off of the beautiful Maho Beach on St. Martin’s island, the Princess Juliana airport strikes fear and wonder into people every day. Because of limited space for runways, planes land precariously close to beach goers every day. Josef Hoflehner has taken the time to capture this phenomenon in beautiful black and white.

Photographs by Josef Hoflehner and Jakob Hoflehner. The Jet Airliner series was taken over a period of several months between early 2009 and late 2011 at Maho Beach on the Dutch/French island of St. Maarten / St. Martin in the Caribbean Sea. The beach is directly adjacent to the relatively short runway of the airport, therefore passenger jets roar as low as four meters above the heads of sunbathers. The Jet Airliner series has often been described as one of the most unique photographic series ever produced.

Joseph Bellows Gallery will be exhibiting this  set of photographs starting June 7th.  It will be on display until July 19th,

For More Information: Josef Hoflehner and Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: David Malin, The Invisible Universe, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography on March 27, 2014 at 12:07 pm
Dust and Gas Adrift in Orion, David Malin

Dust and Gas Adrift in Orion, David Malin

The beauty of the cosmos has always held humanity’s attention. Joseph Bellows has teamed up with David Malin to display Malin’s impressive captures of the night’s sky in an online gallery.

The art of photography has, since its inception, repeatedly crossed paths with the science of astronomy: the art providing the science with new tools of perception and analysis, the science lifting the art into the divine realm of the unseen. The “ancient heavens” which compose the study of astronomy – stars long vanished whose light travels to us through billions of years – remain largely invisible to the naked eye. The alchemy of photography reveals their latent images, providing us with ghostly visions of the origins of our universe.

For over 25 years, the astronomical photographer David Malin (born 1941) has been opening up radically new vistas into this enlarged perception of the universe. His photographs of celestial objects were shot at the Anglo-Australian Observatory in New South Wales – where Malin was the photographic scientist from 1975 to 2001 – using one of the largest telescopes in the world. But it is mainly Malin’s innovative darkroom techniques that have enabled him to produce unparalleled images of distant objects too faint to be seen by the eye alone. In his photographic laboratory in Sidney, Malin has invented new ways of extracting information from astronomical photographs that lead to the discovery of two new types of galaxies, one of which is the largest galaxy known, Malin I. These processes include “photographic amplification”, a way of copying glass plate negatives with a diffuse light source to bring out faint signals that ordinary exposures can’t record, and unsharp masking which enables subtle features to stand out in the brighter parts of an image without overexposing the print.

For more information, and to check out the gallery: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Notable: Recent Aquisitions by Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, California

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 6, 2014 at 4:56 pm
One of Joseph Bellows recent acquisitions: The Grand Tetons, Wyoming, from Sequence 15 1959, by Minor White

One of Joseph Bellows recent acquisitions: The Grand Tetons, Wyoming, from Sequence 15 1959, by Minor White

For an art gallery – photography or otherwise – reaching 15 years of its doors being open, as Joseph Bellows Gallery accomplished last year, is cause for celebration. Just don’t count on them to be lulled into an overt state of contentment. The gallery recently announced the acquisition of works by several notable photographers, including Minor White, Imogen Cunningham, Andre Kertesz, Harry Callahan and Edward Weston; all of whom have been profiled here in recent months. 

Joseph Bellows Gallery was established in 1998. The Gallery features rotating exhibitions of both historic and contemporary works drawn from the gallery’s collection, with a special emphasis on American work. Joseph Bellows is a member of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD), and served on the Board of Directors from 2005 until 2012.

Joseph Bellows Gallery actively seeks to purchase single photographs or entire collections. Please call or email the gallery to submit your information and a member of our staff will contact you shortly. In order to expedite the process, please provide as much information about the item(s) as possible. We are also happy to assist in making arrangements for gallery staff to view the items.

We welcome all offers and inquiries.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10am to 5pm, and Saturday by appointment or chance.

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Enrico Natali at Joseph Bellows Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector on December 11, 2013 at 8:59 pm

EN_017_Community_organizer_Detroit_19680

Community Organizer, Detroit, 1968 by Enrico Natali

Enrico Natali was born in 1933 in Utica, New York, but during the 1960s Natali was in Detroit, photographing images that still resonate emotionally today. These images are the precursors to the racial conflict and political upheaval that swept the country and contributed to Detroit’s modern reputation. The innocence captured in these tender portraits is a haunting look into an astounding period of calm before the storm.

November 2 – December 21, 2014

For more information: Joseph Bellows Gallery