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Posts Tagged ‘photo collector’

Preview: Attractions Nocturnes | Bella Rose, Nicolas Auvray, Hotel Saint-Simon, Angouleme, France

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on April 11, 2017 at 10:20 pm

Look up to sky

We always love to hear from our francophone ami and wonderfully talented Nicolas Auvray. This time, he’s got a great opportunity for photography fans with his exhibition in Angoulême, France at the gorgeous Hotel Saint-Simone.

 Attractions Nocturnes » presents a series of night photographs.  It begins as a night walk through the cities at night. Familiar places are re-discovered, figures appear and disappear in a darkness where metamorphosis and transitions take place. In these images, the city is a metaphor. Paris, Stockholm, New York…no importance… what matters is the universality of the impressions. Spectators are invited to explore other worlds and be transported in dreamlike scenes to follow their aspirations, and maybe deeper, darker passions and to look further in their identity.

For anyone living or travelling to France this month, the exhibit is sure to please.

For More Information: Nicolas Auvray

On site: “The Photography Show”, AIPAD 2017, Pier 94 New York City, MARCH 30 – APRIL 2, 2017

In Art Fair, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 30, 2017 at 7:22 am

Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao_Crowd Tao yuan 2016 Lantern festival Archival Pigment print 20x48 inch

Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao, Crowd, Tao yuan, Lantern festival, 2016

aipad_brandmark_BW copy

The Annual gathering of AIPAD photography galleries and dealers has found a new home and it is a knockout.

Situated at Pier 94 on the West Side of NYC at the Hudson River and 54th street, the new venue affords much more light and space than the previous location at the Park Avenue Armory.

With heavy international dealer representation as well as galleries from around North America, the expanded show over the next few days is a collector’s dream.

Vintage and contemporary works truly dazzle and at times overwhelm the viewer with photographic excellence. (Read more below)

Read the rest of this entry »

Preview: Littoral Drift, Meghann Riepenhoff, Yossi Milo Gallery, NYC, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallerist, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 22, 2017 at 11:18 pm

Image via Yossi Milo Gallery

Far too often people limit their imaginations to what is conventional.That’s why the art world is so wonderful – thinking about new ways to solve and create is expected. Cyanotypes are a perfect example in photography. Historically used for low cost blueprints for engineers, the experiments of photographer Meghann Riepenhoff are anything but the norm.

 

Works from Riepenhoff’s series, Littoral Drift (2013–ongoing), are large-scale dynamic cyanotypes made in collaboration with the landscape. Rather than photographing a scene with film and camera, the artist takes direct imprints from nature. After coating sheets of paper with homemade cyanotype emulsion, she exposes them to the elements, partially submerging them in ocean waves, draping them over a tree branch during a rainstorm or burying them in snow pack. Water, sunlight and sediments, such as sand, salt, detritus and impurities, activate the photosensitive chemicals to create fluid, painterly abstractions of the landscape in Prussian blue or white. The prints’ titles indicate the location, date and conditions under which they were made, anchoring each in a specific moment in time and underscoring the performative aspect of the series.

Riepenhoff only partially fixes her cyanotypes, leaving residual photosensitive chemistry to react to light and the environment. A print’s colors may fluctuate in intensity or salt crystals may bloom on the surface of the paper, subtly changing the artwork over time. The shifting qualities of these “living” prints are both a desirable aesthetic outcome and reflect themes of impermanence, time and mutability that are consistent throughout Riepenhoff’s work.

Meghann Riepenhoff’s work has been presented in exhibitions at the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA; Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA; Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN; University of Missouri, Columbia, MO; San Francisco Camerawork, San Francisco, CA; Museo de la Ciudad, Queretaro, Mexico; Photo Center Northwest, Seattle, WA; Aperture Foundation, New York, NY; and Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX, among others. Riepenhoff earned her BFA in Photography from the University of Georgia, Athens, and her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. The artist was born in 1979 in Atlanta, GA, and currently divides her time between Bainbridge Island, WA, and San Francisco, CA.

Littoral Drift is now open for view until April 29, 2017.

For More Information: Yossi Milo Gallery

Notable: “Grey”, New Book by Michael Benari

In Books, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 2, 2017 at 11:00 am

Michael-Benari-Grey

Fans of our friend Michael Benari are sure to be looking forward to March this year, as Benari will be releasing a new book, titled Grey.Many of the images in this book fall into the genre of “street photography”.

Many of the images in this book fall into the genre of “street photography”. I specifically use the street as a source of inspiration for discovering new ways of creating a visual experience. I think of the work as closely related to certain artistic traditions in painting and feel a close connection to everything abstract that has come before me. At the same time “GREY” is a collection of visual experiments, forcing me to push the limits of perception, and discover new ideas and new forms in the process. Our visual experience today is already saturated with so many accepted notions of beauty that looking to re-shape those assumptions becomes the real challenge for today’s artist. The “street” becomes a kind of outdoor laboratory in which I can still find the chance-encountered visual surprise that helps to re-orient my own perceptions and those in my work. Inasmuch as each image is its own resolution, the entire series of images reflects an on-going process of exploring an unknown terrain waiting to be discovered.

Also on the horizon will be a new show in Boston, MA, at 555 Gallery. Stay tuned for more details and images from the new book and exhibition.

For More Information: Michael Benari

On Site: “Conversations With Myself”, Photographs by Paula Gibson, Red Filter Gallery

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on March 1, 2017 at 1:02 am

alwaysgoesbacktothebeggining

Always Goes Back To the Beginning, Paula Gibson

London based Paula Gibson is somewhat of a mystery in her vision of a very personal world.

This selection of photographs considers reflections on love, what love feels like and the doubts that arise in the arms of second best.

To view the exhibition: Paula Gibson

Preview: Skēnē by Alex Majoli, & Wegee, Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, NY

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on February 21, 2017 at 10:36 am
Alex-majoli-scene-6404

Scene #6404, Cairo, Egypt, Celebrating Mubarak’s resignation in Tahir Square, February 11, 2001, Alex Majoli

Howard Greenberg Gallery is bracing against the February cold with a pair of exciting exhibitions, featured the beloved Weegee (Arthur Fellig) and Alex Majoli.

Alex Majoli:

Alex Majoli (b. Ravenna, Italy, 1971) attended the Art Institute in Ravenna, and while at school traveled to Yugoslavia a number of times to document political conflicts. He graduated in 1991. Three years later, his career began after he photographed the closing of a notorious asylum on the island of Leros in Greece, which resulted in his first monograph entitled Leros. In 1995, Majoli went to South America for several months, photographing a variety of subjects for his ongoing series on Brazil, Tudo Bom. He began the series Hotel Marinum in 1998 documenting life in harbor cities around the world. Also that year, he began making a series of short films and documentaries.

Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theatre. Majoli is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, and the show is his first gallery exhibition in New York City. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, February 16 from 6-8 p.m.

Weegee:

As a photographer and photojournalist, Arthur Fellig (Weegee) was in his own words “spellbound by the mystery of murder.” His uncanny ability to make early appearances at scenes of violence and catastrophe earned him the name Weegee (appropriated from the Ouija board). His film noir style and dry wit combined with his sensational images of the naked city, often taken at night with a strong flash, have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest street photographers of the 20th century.

Among the highlights in the exhibition will be a 1936 self portrait of Weegee getting his own mug shot at a police station. A series of portraits of people looking up in the sky from 1945 depicts children, a police officer, a man with a telescope, and a nun all watching a fire. A 1943 image entitled The Critic, depicts a disdainful onlooker checking out two ornately dressed women on their way to the opera. A touching photograph from c. 1944 shows two animal caretakers sleeping next to a pen with two giraffes at Madison Square Garden.

Both exhibitions are now open and will conclude on the most foolish of days, April 1st.

For More Information: Howard Greenberg Gallery

Preview: Route 66 Motels, John Schott, Joseph Bellows Gallery, La Jolla, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 19, 2017 at 10:56 am

Ringing in the new year, Joseph Bellows Gallery has decided to start things with pure Americana, brought to you through the eyes of photographer John Schott.

In the summer of 1973, John Schott drove Route 66 from the Midwest to California and back, sleeping in his pick-up truck and photographing with an 8 x 10 inch Deardorf view camera. Among his subjects were the motels situated along this expanse of highway.

Route 66 Motels will present a key set of vintage prints that formed Schott’s series of topographic views of these small motels that punctuate this highway landscape, both in daylight and under the glow of artificial illumination. In this collection of vernacular forms, Schott describes a particular architectural structure, within a specific era, while subtly reminding his viewers that the road and its adjacent dwellings are part of what defines the landscape.

In 1975 he received an Individual Artist’s Fellowship in Photography from the National Endowment for the Arts. That same year he was included in William Jenkins’ seminal exhibition at the George Eastman House, New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape. In 2009 a reexamination of this exhibition organized Britt Salvesen toured to numerous museum venues including: the Center for Creative Photography, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Jeu de Paume, Paris and Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, Bilbao.

 

For More Information: Joseph Bellows Gallery

Preview: Classic Photographs by Ansel Adams & Celebrating William Garnett at 100, Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco, CA

In Black and White Photography, Exhibits, Gallery, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 15, 2017 at 1:31 pm
Displaying

Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958, Ansel Adams

For years, Scott Nichols Gallery has been one of the foremost purveyors of Black and White photography in San Francisco. Drawing on their particular love of the American landscape, the SNG’s Little Gallery is featuring the works of Ansel Adams and William Garnett, the latter of whom is being posthumously celebrated for his 100th birthday; Garnett passed away in 2006.

The pair is an appropriate juxtaposition due to their focus in photography and general love of the environment. Adams has long been celebrated as a pioneer in photographing the American West. Born in 1902 , Adams was one of the founders of Group f/64 with Willard Van Dyke and Edward Weston.

As a long time collector of Group f/64, Scott Nichols Gallery will be pulling together a wide assortment of Adams photographs that are part of its collection.

Garnett, born in 1916 in Chicago, Illinois, made his name initially as an independent graphic designer and commercial photographer. What he’s best known for however is it work on the American landscape, like Adams. But unlike Adams, who focused especially on forestry, Garnett’s work was aerial. Over the years, his works were published in magazines such as Fortune, Life and Reader’s Digest.

The Exhibition will be open to visitors until February 25th, 2017.

For More Information: Scott Nichols Gallery

Notable: George Eastman Museum Fundraiser

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on January 5, 2017 at 5:50 pm

Displaying

“The rich man never really gives anything, he only distributes part of the surplus.
It is the person of moderate means who really gives.” 
-George Eastman
It’s the time of celebrating with loved ones and a time for rebirth. It’s also a time for giving to good causes, which donating to the George Eastman museum is in spades.
Entrepreneur George Eastman (1854–1932), the pioneer of popular photography, completed his Colonial Revival mansion on East Avenue in Rochester in 1905 and resided there until his death. He bequeathed most of his assets to the University of Rochester, expressing a desire that his mansion serve as the residence for the university president. The large house, measuring 35,000 square feet, proved far too large for this purpose, especially without a large service staff.

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the State of New York chartered George Eastman House Inc. as an independent nonprofit educational institution—specifically, a museum of photography and allied pursuits created as a memorial to George Eastman. The next year, the University of Rochester donated Eastman’s mansion and surrounding property to the museum. The institution altered its name several times over the ensuing decades, but its mission has remained steadfast: to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit photographic and cinematic objects and related technology from the inception of each medium to the present.

At the museum’s opening in 1949, it was one of only two American museums with a photography department and one of only two American museums with a film department (the Museum of Modern Art also had both). In 1951, the museum opened the beautiful Dryden Theatre, with seating for more than five hundred people, to exhibit films.

The George Eastman museum is still running strong, but it needs help, just like any non-profit. If you’re a photography lover – if you’re reading this chances are good that you are – consider a donation to the museum today.

For More Information and to Donate: George Eastman Museum

Notable: Darkroom Edition 2016 by John Sexton Released

In Black and White Photography, Photo Print Collector, Photographer on December 13, 2016 at 1:04 pm
Trees In Snow, Winter by John Sexton

Trees in Snow, Winter Sn, El Capitan Meadow, Yosemite Valley, CA, 1989, John Sexton

Well, the weather’s turned frightful, but photographs are never not delightful. John Sexton is taking part in the holiday spirit with a special limited release of his Trees in Snow, inspired by his Darkroom Edition fundraiser 30 years ago.

The first limited edition print I released was my image Birch Trunks, New Hampshire. It was offered under the mantle of Darkroom Edition 1986 thirty years ago. The idea behind that limited edition print was to generate funds for the design and construction of our studio darkroom complex in Carmel Valley. Fortunately the edition was a great success, and we are still enjoying the luxury of working in such a fine darkroom, studio, and workshop facility. Much to my surprise I received a number of letters (this was long before emails and eNewsletters!) asking if I would be offering another Darkroom Edition. It had never crossed my mind. Over the years I have offered six previous Darkroom Edition limited edition prints – all of which have sold out. Since 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the Darkroom Edition series, it seemed like a perfect time to rejuvenate the idea.

This image has held a special place in my heart since I made the negative and first printed it a number of years ago. I liked the image so much that I selected it as Plate One in my book Recollections: Three Decades of Photographs. I made this image during a winter trip to my favorite photographic location, Yosemite Valley. The day started out with a heavy overcast that soon lead to a steady snowfall. I made a few negatives as I explored the valley, and the snow kept falling and falling. In early afternoon the clouds suddenly broke and strong, crisp low-angle sunlight raked across El Capitan Meadow. The light moved quickly so I had to respond in kind. Using the 150 mm lens on my 4×5 Linhof Technika camera I made an exposure of 1/2 second at f/45. The high contrast between the intense sunlight on the bright snow and the deep shadows in the background forest necessitated N-1 reduced development, a technique to allow the negative to accommodate such a high contrast situation.

It is an understatement to say that this negative is difficult to print. Dodging takes place during the entire basic exposure with both hands. This is followed by extensive burning in, as well as localized print flashing, a technique to add detail in extremely bright areas. While the printing techniques are challenging, the excitement one gets when turning on the white lights in the darkroom and seeing a print that is “just right” makes it all worthwhile.

These 11 x 14″ silver gelatin prints will be offered in a limited edition of 100 signed and numbered prints along with ten Artist’s Proofs. There will be no reprints. For this special edition, Sexton has reduced the price of the print by 20%. Prints are already shipping, so if you feel the need, act now.

For More Information: John Sexton